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  • Lynn Scott's Clostera albosigma image
    photos above Looking sideways at the moth at rest however you can still see the prominent S curve of the postmedial line just below the costal edge of the forewing with shades of rust and darker gray or gray brown in the subterminal area The whitish lines crossing the forewing appear more or less parallel on the resting moth making it easier to distinguish from Clostera apicalis 7901 which also

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07895.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Lynn Scott's Clostera apicalis image
    can still see an obvious white squiggle of the postmedial line just below the costal edge of the forewing with shades of rusty brown around it The middle of the forewing has an oblique whitish line crossing from the top of the medial area at the costa down to meet the postmedial line at the inner margin quite unlike the lines on the forewing of Clostera albosigma 7895 which also

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07901.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Lynn Scott's Datana ministra image
    1984 Datana ministra can be distinguished by the combination of its reddish brown forewing with no distinct dark shades the scalloped margin of the forewing especially noticeable in the first two photos and its reddish brown thorax In the top right photo looking head on at the moth in bright daylight the thorax appears more of a vivid dark orange color The forewing is crossed by several fairly distinct dark

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07902.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Lynn Scott's Datana perspicua image
    wings around its body or arch them over its body in a roof shape when at rest as in the righthand photo above According to Handfield 1999 and Covell 1984 Datana perspicua can be distinguished by its pale yellowish forewing with its conspicuous brown orbicular and reniform spots likely the reason for giving it the common name of Spotted Datana The lines crossing the forewing are quite sharply defined and

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07908.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Lynn Scott's Nadata gibbosa image
    first photo above Covell 1984 refers to this moth as the White Dotted Prominent named for the two white spots in the reniform spot of the forewing I always think of this moth however as the butterscotch moth because of its yellow color shaded to varying degrees with warm brown or orange The antemedial and postmedial lines are generally well defined The larvae of Nadata gibbosa feed on birch in

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07915.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Lynn Scott's Hyperaeschra georgica image
    is of a second specimen present at the same time Live specimens of Hyperaeschra georgica may be seen at rest with its wings held close to the body in the shape of a peaked roof center right or in a more flattened position center left Covell 1984 describes the forewing as yellowish with gray overlay and black streaks thanks to the streaks and the zig zags of the antemedial and postmedial lines I see it as a bit of a patchwork pattern The am and pm lines are accented with white on the side away from the medial area The specimens I have photographed are generally consistent in having a very noticeably lighter colored patch on the forewing in the center of the basal area inside a large zig in the am line still noticeable even in darker specimens bottom photo When the moth spreads its wings you can clearly see a black tuft projecting from halfway along the inner margin of the forewing top When the moth rests in a tent position the tufts project upwards from the peak you can see the shadow of the tufts in the center right photo The larvae of Hyperaeschra georgica generally feed

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07917.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Lynn Scott's Peridea basitriens image
    elliptical pattern in the basal area of the forewing often accented with orange brown The rest of the forewing is generally gray and the veins are usually clearly visible outside the postmedial line in the subterminal area A black tuft projects from the inner margin but can be hard to distinguish with the wings closed this tuft is not at all obvious in the photo at top left but can

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07919.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Lynn Scott's Peridea angulosa image
    as in the center two photos above but sometimes holds its wings close to the body in the shape of a peaked roof a characteristic pose for many species of Notodontidae Its forewings are gray and somewhat mottled often with a lighter patch in the medial area near the costa According to Covell 1984 the zigzag antemedial and postmedial lines are double black and filled with orangish brown in most of the specimens observed at my location these lines are also accented with touches of white About halfway down the inner margin of the forewing there is a projecting tuft of black scales most evident when the wings are open top left but sometimes also visible in a wings closed position bottom right Although the hindwing is mainly plain grayish to whitish the forward edge of the hindwing is patterned like the forewing In the moth s flattened closed resting position this edge often projects out from beneath the forewing so that this pattern extension is visible as in the two center pictures above The larvae of Peridea angulosa feed on oak In my area the adult moth is most frequently observed in July but may also be seen in

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07920.html (2016-04-29)
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