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  • Lynn Scott's Peridea ferruginea image
    chocolate brown color of Peridea ferruginea is probably the first clue to identifying this moth also known as the Chocolate Prominent Except for color its pattern has many similarities to that of Peridea angulosa 7920 with its double black zigzag antemedial and postmedial lines often accented with white In most of my photos the reniform spot appears as a white lozenge shape in the medial area sometimes with a darker center The medial area is generally paler and more gray in the area bounded by the antemedial line costal and reniform spot Like a number of other Notodontids Peridea ferruginea also has a black tuft projecting from the inner margin of the forewing clearly visible in the first two photos above Its resting position is usually somewhat flattened with wings closed or tented into a peaked roof shape The forward edge of the hindwing carries on the forewing pattern although the remainder of the hindwing is mainly plain grayish to whitish In the bottom right photo above the patterned edge can be seen projecting out from beneath the costal edge of the forewing The larva of this moth feeds on birches Handfield 1999 also notes a record of sugar maple

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07921.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Lynn Scott's Pheosia rimosa image
    is one of the largest Notodontids in my area with a wingspan of 4 5 to 6 2 cm Covell 1984 The black area inside the inner margin of the forewing is streaked with white and a brown shade fades from the black to the white part of the wing At the costal edge the black marking is most prominent towards the apex The lower or inner part of the

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07922.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Lynn Scott's Odontosia elegans image
    along the inner margin culminating in a dark projecting tuft that is readily visible when the moth is resting with wings folded in a tent shape around its body top right and bottom Odontosia elegans is one of the larger Notodontids in my area Covell 1984 indicates a wingspan of 4 5 to 6 cm The hindwing is mostly whitish but a darker marking can be seen at the anal

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07924.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Lynn Scott's Notodonta scitipennis image
    to distinguish from other Notodontids of my area A small tuft protrudes from the inner margin near the end of the antemedial line right Reniform and orbicular spots are clearly defined by pale outlines The antemedial line is scalloped rather than zigzag this and the postmedial line show most clearly where they cross the lighter area near the inner margin Near the apex there are several dark brown dashes surrounded

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07926.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Lynn Scott's Notodonta simplaria image
    its plain appearance that allow it to be distinguished from other similar moths Although the postmedial line is indistinct except at the inner margin the antemedial line is much clearer more scalloped than zigzag The reniform spot is outlined in white The gray of the subterminal area is somewhat mottled with shades of paler gray and may in some specimens show a pale subterminal line At rest this moth holds

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07928.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Lynn Scott's Nerice bidentata image
    reminiscent of those trompe l oeil silhouette figures that can be seen either as an outline of an urn or as facing profiles of two people The double toothed aspect that has given rise to this species name refers to the dark teeth of the dark brown to black band running the length of the forewing The area of the forewing nearest the inner margin is a lighter gray brown color often edged with white which heightens the contrast with the dark teeth Towards the costal edge and apex of the wing the color is paler and there is a dark blotch in the subterminal area following the mark that indicates the beginning of the postmedial line At the outer margin in the subterminal area there is a jagged triangle of gray brown edged on the upper side with black The hindwing is brown At rest Nerice bidentata may hold its folded wings fairly flat top left or may pull them into a peaked roof shape bottom left The host plant of Nerice bidentata is elm According to Handfield 1999 this species appears to have two generations per season in my general area the first appearing from mid May through

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07929.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Lynn Scott's Ellida caniplaga image
    mottled and with undefined areas that are whitish or warm brown Many of the specimens I see at my location have a patch of brown in the upper subterminal area near the costa although such markings are sometimes almost completely absent as in the bottom left photo Covell 1984 notes the triple antemedial line as a distinguishing characteristic of this species this line becomes much less distinct to the point of almost disappearing halfway across the wing The postmedial line is usually much less distinct in my local specimens although an adterminal line represented by a row of black dashes near the outer margin is usually very evident The reniform spot shows as a black crescent surrounded by white This species when not resting in a flattish position often takes the shape of a peaked roof and may even look almost as if its wings are beginning to roll around its body even in the flatter position the wings often look somewhat convex The hindwing is gray brown darkening somewhat toward the outer margin The larvae of Ellida caniplaga feed on basswood linden and this species is sometimes called the Linden Moth According to Handfield 1999 the adult moth may

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07930.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Lynn Scott's Gluphisia septentrionis image
    identification is based on careful comparison of photographs of Gluphisia species in Covell in Handfield on those moth web sites illustrating these species and on discussions with Dr J Donald Lafontaine of Agriculture Canada while I am fairly confident that I ve correctly identified the specimens illustrated and referred to on this web page there remain a number of unidentified photographs in my files which might be Gluphisia septentrionis or possibly other species of Gluphisia Covell 1984 has described Gluphisia septentrionis as having a dark gray forewing with the pattern often obscure Illustrations in Handfield 1999 and on the Internet however generally show a much paler gray than in my specimens above One common feature is the brownish medial area especially evident near the inner margin of the forewing and with no distinctive markings Another identifiable feature is in the basal area where the basal line is deeply indented outlining two brown filled loops right at the base of the wing Covell also refers to whitish antemedial and subterminal areas which are not evident in the specimens above although the subterminal area is perhaps a little paler than the rest of the wing The top left photo also shows a

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07931.html (2016-04-29)
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