archive-com.com » COM » A » ACLERIS.COM

Total: 461

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Lynn Scott's Furcula borealis image
    was my only reference book and I cheerfully labelled the photos as Furcula borealis only to remove the label again in 2001 when Handfield s 1999 guide to Quebec moths informed me of the other similar species Eventually in 2002 some much appreciated help from Jeff Crolla of Toronto and Dr J Donald Lafontaine of Agriculture Canada enabled me to sort out three Furcula species among my photographs Also known as the White Furcula Furcula borealis shows a striking pattern of dark gray and white The medial area of the forewing is filled with dark gray while the basal and subterminal areas are a glistening white in the few specimens I have photographed Basal subterminal and terminal lines are represented by rows of black dots There is also blotch of dark grey at the costal edge just outside the subterminal line In both photos above it is also possible to see a hint of rusty orange picked out along the outer edge of the dark gray median the visibility of these specks of dark orange varies from one specimen to another There seems to be general agreement that the larval host plant is black cherry Prunus serotina poplar and willow

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07936.html (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Lynn Scott's Furcula cinerea image
    row of black dots along the outer margin If you compare it with the high contrast patterns of Furcula borealis 7936 and Furcula occidentalis 7939 both of which are illustrated on this web site you see that Furcula cinerea carries ghostly imprints of their patterns of darker gray in the median and upper subterminal areas A close look also discovers tiny hints of orange along some of the edges of

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07937.html (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Lynn Scott's Furcula occidentalis image
    is one of several species of Furcula that may occur in my area several of which are quite similar in appearance Compare this moth with Furcula borealis 7936 also illustrated on this web site In 2002 some much appreciated help from Jeff Crolla of Toronto and Dr J Donald Lafontaine of Agriculture Canada enabled me to sort out three Furcula species among my photographs Furcula occidentalis shows a pattern of dark gray and light gray to white characteristic of most Furcula species The medial area of the forewing is filled with dark gray while the basal and subterminal areas are pale gray to white but lacking the high contrast evident in Furcula borealis 7936 Basal and terminal lines are represented by rows of black dots In the photos above the subterminal line appears double or triple and is continuous rather than dotted There is also blotch of dark grey at the costal edge just outside the subterminal line In the bottom left photo above it is also possible to see the merest hints of rusty orange adjacent to the dark gray median The larvae of Furcula occidentalis feed on willow and poplar According to Handfield 1999 there are two generations

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07939.html (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Lynn Scott's Macrurocampa marthesia image
    W Thomas formerly of NRCAN and Dr J Donald Lafontaine Agriculture Canada a number of Notodontid species that look gray and or brown in collections actually have quite a greenish color when they are fairly freshly emerged and Macrurocampa marthesia seems to be one such species Among the photos above the bottom photo is probably the closest to the usual descriptions of this species whereas on the night I took the center right photo I was all in a tizzy trying to think of any local moth species that could possibly look such a vivid turquoise blue green color The basal area of the forewing seems to be consistently a dark gray color bounded at the outer edge by a sharply zigzag double antemedial line The median area is somewhat paler variably mottled and usually with the reniform spot marked by a dark crescent In fresh live specimens the dominant color may be gray green through almost turquoise The postmedial line is not very distinct but its scallops are at least intermittently visible especially nearer the inner margin A toothed subterminal line is usually preceded by a dark gray shade noticeable in the upper half of the subterminal area The

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07975.html (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Lynn Scott's Heterocampa obliqua image
    margin This species is sexually dimorphic and Covell 1984 indicates that the female has a pinkish brown apical patch and grayish brown hindwings Covell 1984 and Handfield 1999 illustrate both sexes but all the specimens I have photographed appear to be male The forewing is generally gray to gray brown with clearly marked double broadly scalloped antemedial and postmedial lines crossing the wing The reniform spot is marked by a

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07983.html (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Lynn Scott's Heterocampa guttivitta image
    species have quite a green color when fresh but tend to look much more gray or brown in older specimens In general Heterocampa guttivitta is smaller less bulky and a little more mottled than Heterocampa biundata While I am fairly confident that I ve correctly identified the specimens illustrated and referred to on this web page there remain a number of unidentified photographs in my files that are simply labeled as Heterocampa The forewing of Heterocampa guttivitta is overall a deep greenish color shaded with gray in fresher specimens top and bottom left above but appears more brownish in older specimens top and bottom right above Most of the markings are usually indistinct In the two top photos it is possible to make out the double zigzag antemedial line outlined in black with greenish to brownish filling The first photo also shows a fairly distinct postmedial line double scalloped and filled with green but in the other photos the main evidence of this line is the lighter marking at the inner margin above the anal angle In the fresher specimens at left the subterminal line also shows fairly clearly as a line of black spots According to Covell 1984 the reniform spot appears as a black crescent in a light gray oval but this marking does not stand out on any of the specimens shown above The hindwing is gray patterned at its leading edge as if to extend the am and pm lines of the forewing In the last photo this edge of the hindwing can be seen protruding beyond the costa of the forewing compare the same feature in Peridea angulosa 7920 and Peridea ferruginea 7921 where the moth is resting in a slightly flattened version of the peaked roof shape characteristic of the Notodontidae The appearance of

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07994.html (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Lynn Scott's Heterocampa biundata image
    easy to confuse with Heterocampa guttivitta 7994 which is also illustrated on this web site Thanks to Dr A W Thomas formerly of NRCAN and Dr J Donald Lafontaine Agriculture Canada I also learned that both these Heterocampa species have quite a green color when fresh but tend to look much more gray or brown in older specimens In general Heterocampa biundata is larger bulkier and a little less mottled than Heterocampa guttivitta While I am fairly confident that I ve correctly identified the specimens illustrated and referred to on this web page there remain a number of unidentified photographs in my files that are simply labeled as Heterocampa The forewing of Heterocampa biundata is quite green fading to brown in older specimens The antemedial and postmedial lines are double and scalloped marked in black with lighter filling that may appear orangish in very fresh specimens The reniform spot is marked with a black crescent on a white to beige background In the subterminal area black wedges mark the subterminal line The hindwing is mostly gray In the bottom photo where it protrudes beyond the costa of the forewing the leading edge of the hindwing can be seen to continue

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07995.html (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Lynn Scott's Lochmaeus bilineata image
    a sharp bend adjacent to the costal edge bottom photo These lines are black next to the median but edged with pale gray on the side away from the median In the bottom photo a similar basal line can also be seen The reniform spot is somewhat indistinct but shows in the median as a black mark inside a bent oval of lighter gray The area between the faint subterminal

    Original URL path: http://acleris.com/dls/07999.html (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive



  •