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  • Vivaldi Concerti Op.8 reviews | Avison Ensemble
    seem in principle much of a virtue but I find it a refreshing antidote to the power driven impulsive interpretations so common in Vivaldi performances today That said there are some little things to murmur about No two modern interpretations of the harpsichord realisation for the sleeping drunkards movement in the slow movement of the Autumn concerto ever sound the same and it is striking how few of these realisations do the obvious i e something similar to violin parts whenever the arpeggio instruction appears which is to devise a standardised broken chord figure for the right hand that can be repeated with notes smoothly changing to fit the harmony over the full length of the passage Beznosiuk s harpsichordist Roger Hamilton begins by merely spreading the dotted minim chords not really what Vivaldi and his contemporaries mean by arpeggio then embarks on a swirling rhapsody that only towards the end coalesces into the kind of simple figuration he should have adopted from the start I find Beznosiuk s ornamentation a little too imprecise in rhythm although I applaud his skill at making improvised or quasi improvised matter sound distinct on account of its delicate quality from the written notes I think it was rash of him to ornament the solo line so fully in the slow movement of the Spring concerto since this queers the pitch of the rustling leaves figuration in the orchestral violins Here and there I spotted some questionably inflected or not inflected notes Since I have been a joint editor of The Four Seasons I am more aware than many of the minefield that baroque accidentals can constitute the central problem lies in the retention or not of chromatic inflection after the first note bearing the accidental 18th century music is fairly consistent in applying certain ground rules significantly different from the modern ones but one always has to be extra vigilant whenever composers such as Vivaldi with his taste for bizarria enter chromatic territory since more than one musical solution is theoretically possible Finally I was puzzled by the non observance of several piano directions in the original engraved score which I imagine survive in all modern editions Such directions are not so common as to be that readily discounted All things considered this is a version to recommend It presents Vivaldi not as a freak of nature but as a civilised musician with a well developed taste for the experimental Congratulations too to Simon Fleming for a very informative and thoughtful booklet essay mirroring the solid virtue of the performance Classical Source these are well nuanced performances that will amply reward repeated listens Graham Rogers 13 December 2011 It is incredible although immensely popular in his own lifetime that the name of Antonio Vivaldi all but faded into obscurity after his death in 1741 Doubly incredible because following the rediscovery of his music in the 1950s Vivaldi is now among the most well known of all composers He owes his universal fame to one work in particular or rather four works a collection of violin concertos that depict in vivid musical language each of the seasons The Four Seasons is one of the most recorded works ever with versions in all manner of styles to suit every possible taste Yet this doesn t dampen record companies enthusiasm for churning out new recordings but do we need them It is only possible to answer that in each instance In the case of The Avison Ensemble it is an emphatic yes especially as we are offered all twelve concertos which make up Vivaldi s magnificent Opus 8 grandly if somewhat enigmatically entitled The Trial between Harmony and Invention Under the direction of Pavlo Beznosuik who also takes the solo violin lines these ingratiating performances are full of thoughtful and thought provoking insight The North of England based Avison Ensemble plays on period instruments but those who are used to the pungent even aggressive cut and thrust of groups such as Fabio Biondi s Europa Galante may be surprised by this more refined sound Beznosiuk s approach is instantly apparent in the first movements of Spring and Autumn with their relatively long note values and smoother articulation than most historically informed bands Much of the playing is enchantingly beautiful but also persuasively apt subtle solo ornamentation in the second movement of Spring the marvellously pulsing orchestral build up at the start of Winter and the sweetly lyrical solo in its second movement effectively contrasted with the unusually energetic cello line and delicate pizzicato violins Beznosuik is a sensitive soloist not shy to take the limelight but never one to hog it And it soon becomes apparent that he and the Ensemble are also capable of the rawness and bite of other groups but the musicians employ them more sparingly and arguably with stronger impact You will be disappointed if you want the barking dog in Spring to leap uncouthly from the texture but the final movement of Winter is ear pinning in its intensity and the conclusion of Autumn has a visceral incisively edged attack infused with the pungent earthiness of percussively strumming lute The remaining eight concertos display the same characteristics Highlights include Beznosiuk s extraordinary virtuosic displays over sustained pedal notes in the finale of No 8 the almost Bach like sophistication of No 11 the most substantial concerto in the set and Beznosiuk s favourite and the unrestrained rustic joy of No 12 Occasionally a touch more flamboyance would be welcome such as in the ebullient first movement of No 5 The Storm at Sea which sounds more like a minor squall but in general these are well nuanced performances that will amply reward repeated listens We tend to take The Four Seasons for granted music that is always around us but if you haven t made the time to fully engage with its justly celebrated charms and startling originality recently there is no better way to do so than with this delightful set The SACD sound is admirably well balanced clear and immediate Audiophile Audition emphasize the music first and mechanics second Nicely done Steven Ritter 15 December 2011 The Four Seasons The Four Seasons The Four Seasons Is there anyone in the world who hasn t at least heard of The Four Seasons Its extreme popularity the plethora of recordings and its presence on a multitude of commercials and background scores to movies its title even graced an Alan Alda film make it most likely the best known piece of classical music in the world and possibly the best known piece of music period It has been played on violin flute koto sax quartet trumpet you name it with versions ranging from full orchestra to string quartet It sometimes uses one soloist as on this recording or four soloists as on the Hogwood recording It has been electronically reproduced and even has a choral version The public fascination with this piece is simply amazing And I love it too It endlessly entertains and sounds fresh as a daisy over and over But it is only part of the story Though it does contain a sonnet probably written by the composer himself complete with cue marks in the score in the style of John Milton and is intended as a four concerto unit it is also the tip of a much larger iceberg called The Trial between Harmony and Invention a series of twelve concertos that begins with The Four Seasons Often the other concertos get overlooked when in fact several of them are the Season s equals like the invigorating No 5 The Storm at Sea Two others retain titles as well No 6 Pleasure and No 10 The Hunt The set also has one oboe concerto as well though most often all are played on the violin Each of these works is a beautiful composition and all are worthy of a devoted Vivaldi lover s attention The 13 member Avison Ensemble uses a middle of the road approach not especially period instrument oriented like some others I am familiar with that take rapid fire tempos that border on the ludicrous and are so aggressively vigorous one is hard pressed to wonder where Vivaldi s poetry disappeared to These in fact have the musical feeling of older perhaps somewhat wiser in many ways takes on the music that emphasize the music first and mechanics second Pavlo Beznosiuk is a fine player that offers a sincere take on these works and looks back more to the violinists of the last century than to what is currently period doctrine I found his recent readings of the Bach Sonatas and Partitas similarly done is this vein with consequent plusses and minuses These readings are slightly in the neutral zone powerfully played but not as incisive and propulsive as say the old Pinchas Zukerman recording on Sony Essential Classics still one of the best out there Linn seems to favor a relatively resonant acoustic and while I did not appreciate this on the Bach album it works much better here I still prefer Lara St John s recent SACD recording on Ancalagon as best of breed but as a Super Audio recording this one sits very well and is competitive with 95 of the others out there Nicely done ClassicsToday com ideally realized by the superb period instrument Avison Ensemble David Vernier 06 December 2011 During its 42 year 17 162 performance original off Broadway run the Fantasticks made a lot of theatre history and it also challenged the editors of the New Yorker s weekly theatre listings to come up with something new to say about the production after virtually everyone on earth already knew what the show was about So eventually they resorted to just randomly quoting lines from oh Shakespeare the Declaration of Independence the Gettysburg Address weather reports famous novels etc anything to fill the space The time is long past to award such treatment to reviews of Vivaldi s first four Op 8 concertos known to virtually every living creature with intelligence above the level of a grub as The Four Seasons How many recordings are there in the catalog Perhaps not yet 17 162 but we re getting there However with respect for the performers and producers of this excellent recording I must say that if you somehow have managed to amass a classical CD collection without a single copy of these concertos shame on you then this set which expands the deservedly beloved Four Seasons to include all 12 equally deserving Op 8 concertos will serve you as well or better than any other in the catalog ideally realized by the superb period instrument Avison Ensemble and recorded in vibrant extraordinarily detailed sound Solo violinist director Pavlo Beznosiuk is as formidable and engaging as any virtuoso who s ever tackled these challenging pieces and his orchestra provides consistently first class support And now to my real review It was the best of times it was the worst of times it was the age of wisdom it was the age of foolishness Early Music Review Ian Graham Jones 01 February 2012 Vivaldi s Op 8 set of twelve concertos begins with The Four Seasons but it is good to have the complete set of violin concertos in one box On disc 1 the Seasons are followed by the excitingly evocative Il Tempesta di Mare and the pleasing Il Piacere featuring Pavlo Beznosiuk s virtuoso playing while the second disc contains some of the less familiar concertos all except for La Caccia without programmatic context which contain some of the finest music of the Op 8 set Continuo is varied Beznosiuk uses archlute or baroque guitar harpsichord or organ in different concertos The booklet has some useful brief notes and the complete texts of The Seasons though it is pity that it is printed white on green paper not the best for those with eye problems BBCi The playing is enchanting and almost always persuasively apt Graham Rogers 06 December 2011 A delightful new set which showcases The Four Seasons startling originality Vivaldi s Four Seasons is one of the most recorded works of all time Does the world really need another version When the performances are as ingratiating and thoughtful as these the answer is a definite yes As extra enticement The Avison Ensemble under the direction of soloist Pavlo Beznosuik offer not just the first four but all 12 violin concertos which make up Vivaldi s Op 8 The trial between harmony and invention The north of England based musicians play on period instruments but listeners who are used to the visceral dynamism of groups such as Fabio Biondi s Europa Galante may be surprised by this more refined sound characterised by relatively long note values and smooth articulation The playing is enchanting and almost always persuasively apt try the subtle solo ornamentation in the second movement of Spring the marvellously pulsing orchestral build up at the start of Winter and its lyrical second movement solo effectively contrasted with energetic cello line and delicate pizzicato violins Beznosuik is a sensitive soloist not shy to take the limelight but he never hogs it He and his ensemble are capable of rawness and bite but they employ them more sparingly than some groups arguably with stronger impact You will be disappointed if you want Vivaldi s depiction of the dog in Spring to snarl from the texture but the final movement of Winter is ear pinningly intense and the conclusion of Autumn has a sharp edged attack infused with the earthiness of percussively strumming lute Highlights from the rest of the set include Beznosuik s impressive virtuosic displays in the finale of No 8 the almost Bach like sophistication of No 11 the most substantial concerto in the set and the rustic joy of No 12 Occasionally a touch more flamboyance would be welcome the first movement of No 5 The storm at sea sounds more like a minor squall but in general these well nuanced performances are amply rewarding The sound on hybrid SACD is well balanced and clear We tend to take The Four Seasons for granted but if you haven t fully engaged with its justly celebrated charms and startling originality recently there is no better way to do so than with this delightful new set Halesowen News they breathe new life into the splendours of the Italian Baroque with all their familiar insight and attention to detail Kevin Bryan 03 March 2012 The Avison Ensemble add their name to the ever growing list of classical performers who ve recorded Vivaldi s Four Seasons over the years as they unveil this thoughtfully crafted collection The British period instrumentation specialists also tackle a further eight of the prolific Venetian s violin concertos as they breathe new life into the splendours of the Italian Baroque with all their familiar insight and attention to detail Pizzicato 01 March 2012 WÄRM UND LICHT 1725 veröffentlichte Antonio Vivaldi séin Opus8 Il cimento dell armonia e dell invenzione eine Sammlung von 12 Concerti darunter der Klassik Dauerbrenner Die 4 Jahreszeiten Nachdem die romantisierende Interpretationstradition des barocken Répertoires überwunden war und die historische Aufführungspraxis ihren Siegeszug angetreten hatte ist man an schnittige scharf akzentuierte affektvolle Lektüren gewohnt Das britische Avison Ensemble geht einen anderen nicht minder spannenden Weg Vivaldis Musik klingt nach wie vor sehr klar und transparent strahit allerdings mehr Wärme und Licht aus Der Dirigent des Ensembles Pavlo Beznosiuk setzt hörbar auf einen pastoralen Touch und zarte Poesie Dennoch wirken die fast zwei Stunden mit Vivaldi immer erfrischend Das wunderbar dynamisch artikulierende Ensemble lässt uns stets Neues erleben und das macht diese Einspielung wirklich spannend und hörenswert BBC Music Martin Cotton 01 October 2012 Long gone are the days when the only concerto heard from this set of 12 were The Four Seasons and this recording is the latest in a fairly long list Like many of those this rendition is played on period instruments which have often come to mean strong attack primarycolours and sharply articulated phrasing Not here The Avison Ensemble takes a gentle approach especially in the slow movements the barking dog in Spring is not in the least threatening and the movement conjures up a sleepy pastoral scene At the outset of Autumn we hear long bows and sustained texture quite unlike the sound that might come from Il Giardino Armonico for example and even Winter is ingratiating rather than spiky There is rhythmic vivacity in the outer movements of all the concertos but Pavlo Beznosiuk has plainly chosen an approach that suits his naturally mellifluous style There is little of the rubato that has become such a feature of Baroque playing and the continuo is often unobtrusive The relatively resonant recording smooths the edges even more Audiophilia a beautifully packaged beautifully recorded finely played and thoroughly desirable release Andy Fawcett 09 July 2012 I still remember it just like it was yesterday The year was 1986 and while browsing a rack of vinyl I happened upon an attractive looking black gatefold sleeve the music was familiar but the orchestra and record label were not Suitably impressed that they went to the trouble of listing the microphones used for the recording I bought it The band was the Drotningholm Baroque Ensemble the label BIS and the music was Vivaldi s Four Seasons What that small group of musicians achieved in managing to completely reinvigorate such an overplayed classic to find so much more energy drama beauty and pathos in those familiar tunes than I have ever heard before or since still astounds me to this day However BIS s CD transfers during the 80s could be extremely poor so my search for a recommendable version on silver disc has been ongoing Performances on modern instruments I have rejected en masse usually bludgeoned to death by oversized orchestras and slow tempos none offered the essential nimbleness and piquant timbres

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  • Garth Cello Concertos reviews | Avison Ensemble
    of flair style and occasional significant breadth The Sixth Concerto is the most expansive having at its center a gorgeous Siciliana that would even make an Italian composer green with envy and the unsettled mood of the opening movement of the Fifth Concerto is certainly among the best written in England at the time The performances are equally commendable Richard Tunnicliffe is in complete control of his instrument c 1730 which is attributed to Leonhard Manisell of Nuremberg Tunnicliffe s tone is rich and deep across the range of his cello never thinning or becoming anemic and his technique is more than up to the demands required by Garth The Avison Ensemble is small no doubt to some degree in keeping with the forces available to Garth but there is no lack of tonal strength here They also play with generous helpings of solid musicianship not to mention complete dedication The tempos are comfortable never rushed or lugubrious and the sound is quite vivid no doubt due to the acoustic properties of the venue The Picture Gallery Paxton House Berwick upon Tweed This is a must have for cellists Anglophiles and all who cherish music of the era it is also the latest inductee into our Classical Hall of Fame Early Music News I strongly recommend these highly enjoyable discs Richard Maunder John Garth 1721 1810 organist virtuoso cellist and concert promoter published these concertos in 1760 but had evidently played one in Durham as early as 1753 The music is attractive inventive and skilfully crafted in an up to date pre classical idiom which might seem surprising for English concertos written in the decade before J C Bach s arrival in London But we are coming to recognize that England wasn t stuck in a Handelian time warp in the 1750s the new style had been pioneered by Giuseppe Sammartini who died in London in 1750 and published concertos by such composers as Johann Stamitz and C P E Bach were widely available Garth s concertos will bear comparison with anything of the time from Mannheim or Vienna and are a real gift to cellists They should be much better known The concertos are beautifully played by Richard Tunnicliffe very stylishly accompanied by a one to a part group for which three cheers who make as full a sound in the tuttis as many a bigger ensemble It just shows that you don t need anachronistically large forces to do justice to music of this kind More cheers for Tunnicliffe s excellent cadenzas and some tasteful ornamentation on the repeats I strongly recommend these highly enjoyable discs The Consort I heartily thank Richard Tunnicliffe and the Avison Ensemble for bringing these works back to the English public Tatty Theo John Garth 1721 1810 was a Durham cellist who possibly studied with Charles Avison the Newcastle composer from the Avison Ensemble takes its name The detailed CD booklet notes by Simon Fleming provide a wealth of interesting and detailed background information about Garth Avison and music in the region in the 18 th century Garth was a prolific composer who wrote various types of music Although his most popular and enduring works were composed for cello The set of concertos known as Opus 1 were published in 1760 although they had been in the public domain for several years before that through various performances in the northeast of England Contemporary newspaper reports mention that Garth followed the pattern of many 18 th century composers and dedicated the works to a member of the royal family In the second half of the 18 th century the cello was the most popular stringed instrument and royalty played no small part in this Since Handel s time members of the royal family such as Frederick Prince of Wales 1707 1751 and George IV 1762 1830 had played the cello and this of course had increased its popularity and made it a much sought after instrument The extensive dissemination of music and instruments both through the widespread printing of music and through instruments brought back as souvenirs by noblemen on the Grand Tour had made England particularly receptive to music for this wonderfully rich instrument Great English instrument makers such as Benjamin Banks Joseph Hill Thomas Dodd Peter Wamsley and William Forster came into prominence during the second half of the 18 th century Garth s set of Cello Concertos op 1 are dedicated to the Duke of York who in 1760 was Edward a keen amateur cellist allegedly of some talent Each of the six concertos follows the same 3 movement pattern fast slow fast sometimes incorporating a popular dance movement such as a Gigue Siciliana or Minuet Five of the six concertos are in a major key and all have an elegant gallant feel to them appropriate to these transitional times at the end of the high baroque period and foreshadowing the early classical style Garth composed these pieces to play himself and as these concertos show he was undoubtedly a gifted cellist Little is known of his cellistic training such as whom he studied with or what instrument he played He is likely to have played an English instrument One wonders whether he travelled at all and whether he ever visited London Would he for example have known of the great Italian émigré cellist Giovanni Basevi Cervetto 1680 1783 who was a vital force in London s musical life or was Garth working in a musical vacuum in terms of cellists I suspect the latter especially since Garth s compositions date from a time when most of the great late 18 th century English cellists and composers such as John Crosdill and James Cervetto were only babies At this time there were no other cello concertos written by English composers so far as I am aware Those by Joseph Reinagle and Robert Lindley for example were written much later It seems that the only cello concerto written by a composer living

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  • Corelli Violin Sonatas Op.5 reviews | Avison Ensemble
    harpsichord or chamber organ heard in Sonatas Nos 1 2 and 4 played here by Roger Hamilton with guitar Sonatas Nos 7 and 12 and archlute played by Paula Chateauneuf The overall effect is apposite while the warm and natural recording ambience provided by St George s Church Chesterton Cambridge seems ideal for music of this scale and period The question of ornamentations however remains a vexing persistent one As early as 1728 the diarist Roger North expressed the view that many of the tamperings ascribed to Corelli himself in Etienne Roger s 1710 reprint were unsupportable adding that Upon the bare view of the print anyone would wonder how much vermin could creep into the works of such a master Linn s insert notes make it clear who was responsible and for what in this new recording explaining that the closing movement of Sonata No 11 includes four variations by Matthew Dubourg 1703 67 and that in the Gavotta of the preceding work the six variations heard are by Beznosiuk himself Much as I relished the superb playing and thoroughgoing musical intelligence informing these new Avison Ensemble accounts Beznosiuk doesn t take the same chances with the music that prove so irresistibly compelling in Manze s survey If perceived correctness is more of a priority for you than living on the edge in this music then I have no hesitation in commending Beznosiuk ahead of Manze Most listeners I suspect would probably prefer not to have to choose between Manze and Beznosiuk so distinguished are their respective offerings and in the last analysis one would probably gain most from having the luxury of each of these outstanding traversals readily to hand The Strad Colours abound in idiomatic performances of Corelli idiomatic thoroughly polished performances Robin Stowell 01 June 2013 Colours abound in idiomatic performances of Corelli In this second volume of the Avison Ensemble s project to record Corelli s complete chamber music Pavlo Beznosiuk and his colleagues treat the twelve op 5 Sonatas not merely as unaccompanied duos for violin and violone cello with the option of substituting a harpsichord for the latter but constantly ring the changes by including an organ archlute and guitar in the instrumentarium A true kaleidoscope of colours results These discs have all the virtues expected of the Avison brand an exemplary recording with immediacy and presence and idiomatic thoroughly polished performances with laudable improvisational flair internal rapport and blend Additional ornamentation is supplied in abundance the stylised dances are sharply characterised and the voicing of the polyphonic movements is crystal clear Tempos are generally carefully determined even if the Gavotta of no 10 seems somewhat pedestrian at the outset But there is good reason Beznosiuk s own additional variations are technically very challenging matching those of Matthew Dubourg for the equivalent movement of no 11 The pitching of A 392Hz may play tricks with some ears indeed there are moments of questionable intonation but Beznosiuk applies expressive vibrato generously heightening the emotional weight of phrases His reading of the La Folia variations is especially fluent well paced and exhilarating MusicWeb International A worthy successor to the Avisons recording of Corelli s Op 6 concerti grossi Brian Wilson 16 April 2013 Having recently made a very successful recording of Arcangelo Corelli s Op 6 Concerti grossi CKD411 the Avison Ensemble now turn in commemoration of the tercentenary of his death to his less well known Op 5 Sonatas for violin and continuo The very name of the group almost guarantees sympathetic performances Charles Avison had studied with Francesco Geminiani in London and had arranged both Geminiani s and Domenico Scarlatti s Corelli inspired sonatas as concerti grossi Less well known these sonatas may be apart perhaps from the twelfth la Folia which spawned a whole genre more on this anon but they are both attractive and fearfully difficult The members of the Avison Ensemble add variety to the continuo line with Roger Hamilton alternating between harpsichord and organ and Paula Chateauneuf adding archlute or guitar to some of the sonatas In addition to the fourth movement of No 10 gavotta are added six variations by Pavlo Beznosiuk extending the movement by some seven minutes and the fifth movement of No 12 another gavotta consists of four variations by Matthew Dubourg 1703 1767 again some five minutes longer than Corelli s published version The Op 5 sonatas were published in 1700 as a violino e violone ò cembalo so Manze and Egarr and the Naxos performers are quite right to choose simply to employ violin and harpsichord the text says cello OR harpsichord and I ve defended this as making perfectly sound musical sense in my review of the Naxos Volume 2 There s no question of the music sounding austere with that simple line up On the other hand Corelli s ò is often take to mean either or and the new recordings do so without overdoing the variety The use of the guitar in No 12 la Folia is particularly appropriate in view of the Iberian origin of the tune which gave rise to these variations probably a Portuguese folk song Corelli was by no means the first to employ this tune but it was his Op 5 12 sonata which kick started a whole series of imitations most notably by Geminiani as recorded by The Purcell Band on Hyperion CDH55234 and the Academy of Ancient Music on Harmonia Mundi HMX2907262 both at budget price The small additions to the two gavottes are stylish and it s nice to hear thevariations in the performance of the bass line I found the Avison Ensemble s recording of Corelli s Op 6 revelatory in several respects even with very good performances already available directed by Trevor Pinnock DG and Roy Goodman Hyperion The Op 5 recordings may not be quite so revelatory but they can certainly more than compete with the opposition Though it s somewhat over exposed I imagine that most potential purchasers

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  • 404 - Not found Avison Ensemble
    The Charles Avison Building Scores and editions Ben Zander workshops Young Musicians Awards Education and Outreach Wandering Minstrels Newsletters Sponsors 404 not found The page you are looking for could not be found We ve recently updated our site please use the navigation above to find your way around or go back and try again The Avison Ensemble 3 Bentinck Place Newcastle upon Tyne NE4 6XN Tel 44 0 191

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