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  • Should I Be Using Public Participation?
    decision making powers openly and to involve interested and affected parties before making its decision 3 Unknown public perceptions and other information gaps exist When information about the perceptions and values of citizens and organizations is required prior to making a decision 4 Controversy around the issue or decision exists For decisions involving controversy of sufficient magnitude or where it is sufficiently valuable to engage in public participation Gauging the Level of Involvement The following illustration which has particular relevance to step four shows the range of public participation opportunities that may exist along with the related objectives and the types of commitments that are being made Determine the Level of Participation   Share the Objective of the Public Participation  Inform Listen OBJECTIVE To provide balanced and objective information to support understanding by the public To obtain feedback on analysis alternatives and or decisions Publicize the Commitment Level  Inform Listen COMMITMENT To Inform the public To listen to and acknowledge the public s concerns Determine the Level of Participation  Share the Objective of the Public Participation  Discuss Engage OBJECTIVE To work with the public to ensure that concerns and aspirations are understood and considered To facilitate discussions and agreements between public parties to identify common ground for action and solutions Publicize the Commitment Level  Discuss Engage COMMITMENT To work with the public to exchange information ideas and concerns To seek advice and innovations from and amongst various public parties Determine the Level of Participation  Share the Objective of the Public Participation  Partner OBJECTIVE To create governance structures to delegate decisionmaking and or work directly with the public Publicize the Commitment Level  Partner COMMITMENT To work with the public to implement agreed upon decisions Source Adapted from Health Canada and International Association of Public Participation Step 3 Determine the issues related to the decision for each of the affected parties Having established that public participation would be appropriate for the decision at hand the next step is to determine how issues relating to the decision are viewed by the decision maker and the public and stakeholder groups Understanding the history of issues relating to a particular decision from the perspective of both the decision maker and interested or affected parties is paramount One way to determine how each of the affected or interested parties view issues relating to the pending decision is to ask them using any of a range of methods including for example interviews focus groups and surveys Step 4 Determine the level of public participation that the decision maker needs and what to consult on Assess and document the public participation requirements of the decision maker The decision making organization must confirm the type and amount of information needed to support decision making and the form that information must take in order to be credible and of use in influencing decision making This process involves three stages Determine the level of participation Share the objective of the public participation

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/396 (2016-02-12)
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  • Further Information
    illustrative example for Public Participation Principles and Best Practices for British Columbia please click here PDF 733KB Contact Information Office of the Auditor General of British Columbia 8 Bastion Square

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/405 (2016-02-12)
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  • Where Can Organizations Start in Defining Their Approach to Public Participation? | Auditor General of British Columbia
    public participation effort while permitting the flexibility necessary to cater to the range of public participation settings Outlined below are examples of commonly used principles for engaging in public participation Authenticity The decision has not been made and the decision maker commits to be influenced to a specific level that will be communicated in advance Accountability The decision maker will demonstrate that results and outcomes are consistent with the commitment that was made to stakeholder groups and the public at the outset of the initiative Inclusiveness The decision maker will make every reasonable effort to include the stakeholder groups and the public affected by the pending decision Transparency The decision maker will ensure that stakeholder groups and the public that are affected understand the scope of the pending decision the decision process and procedures and any constraints facing the decision maker Commitment The decision maker will provide appropriate time and resources to ensure that those involved can participate in a meaningful way Integrity The decision maker will address public and stakeholder group concerns in an honest and forthright way Public Participation Principles and Best Practices for British Columbia up Should I Be Using Public Participation Printer friendly version Public Participation

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/394/395 (2016-02-12)
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  • Step 1 - Determine who the decision-maker is, what the pending decision is and who will be affected. | Auditor General of British Columbia
    of people and their appropriate representatives Consider how and when the general public could be impacted by a decision and be proactive in inviting their input There are several steps in doing this identify the ultimate decision maker draft a statement describing the pending decision and list the intended and unintended effects of the decision identify the people or groups that will be affected by the decision and determine the impacts and the significances of these impacts for each group positive and negative direct and indirect Should I Be Using Public Participation up Step 2 Decide if public participation should be used Printer friendly version Public Participation Principles and Best Practices for British Columbia Where Can Organizations Start in Defining Their Approach to Public Participation Should I Be Using Public Participation Step 1 Determine who the decision maker is what the pending decision is and who will be affected Step 2 Decide if public participation should be used Gauging the Level of Involvement Step 3 Determine the issues related to the decision for each of the affected parties Step 4 Determine the level of public participation that the decision maker needs and what to consult on Step 5 Determine the

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/394/397 (2016-02-12)
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  • How Can These Principles Be Put Into Practice?
    house Click on sections of the house to find out more Source Australian National Audit Office Public Sector Governance 2003 1 Leadership ethics and a culture committed to good public sector governance The implementation evaluation and improvement of a public sector organization s governance structures and processes are the responsibility of leaders and without such commitments there would be no foundation to build on 2 Stakeholder relationships internal and external Understanding the various roles accountabilities and needs of each stakeholder group contributes to strong relationships and supports the success of the three central components or windows of the House of Governance 3 Risk management This provides a public sector organization with the means to understand and address risks in order to better achieve its objectives 4 Internal compliance and accountability An efficient and well governed public sector organization will ensure that internal controls and accountabilities are clearly defined and consistent with the organization s objectives 5 Planning and performance monitoring Governing bodies that review and foster better planning and performance monitoring will be more effective and relevant 6 External compliance and accountability External scrutiny is an integral part of work in the public service and meeting these accountabilities is one

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/408 (2016-02-12)
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  • Leadership, Ethics and a Culture Committed to Good Public Sector Governance | Auditor General of British Columbia
    resources to lead effectively A formal code of conduct is adopted by the organization Appropriate structures and processes are in place to ensure the organization is free of influence by prejudice bias or conflicts of interest Members of the governing body exercise leadership by conducting themselves in accordance with high standards of behavior as a role model for others in the organization Good governance flows from a shared ethos or culture with this being expressed as values and demonstrated in behaviour How Should We Gauge our Progress and Successes up Stakeholder Relationships Internal and External Printer friendly version Managing Knowledge A guide to good practice Public Sector Governance A Guide to the Principles of Good Practice Where Should We Start How Can These Principles Be Put Into Practice How Should We Gauge our Progress and Successes Leadership Ethics and a Culture Committed to Good Public Sector Governance Stakeholder Relationships Internal and External Risk Management Internal Compliance and Accountability Planning and Performance Monitoring External Compliance and Accountability Information and Decision Support Review and Evaluation of Governance Arrangements Is There More to Good Governance Further Information Comments from the Auditor General and Chief Information Officer of B C What is knowledge and

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/406/410 (2016-02-12)
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  • Stakeholder Relationships (Internal and External) | Auditor General of British Columbia
    channels of communication are established with stakeholders regarding the organization s mission roles objectives and performance Effective communication is established with stakeholders including procedures for both internal and external enquiries and complaints Information in general is shared among key players politicians public servants and other stakeholders subject to respecting the confidentiality of personal information and commercial confidences Communication to stakeholders is balanced understandable transparent and timely Accountability to stakeholders is promoted by publicizing the identity of the members of the governing body together with information about how and why they came to be appointed Clear management processes are established and documented Leadership Ethics and a Culture Committed to Good Public Sector Governance up Risk Management Printer friendly version Managing Knowledge A guide to good practice Public Sector Governance A Guide to the Principles of Good Practice Where Should We Start How Can These Principles Be Put Into Practice How Should We Gauge our Progress and Successes Leadership Ethics and a Culture Committed to Good Public Sector Governance Stakeholder Relationships Internal and External Risk Management Internal Compliance and Accountability Planning and Performance Monitoring External Compliance and Accountability Information and Decision Support Review and Evaluation of Governance Arrangements Is There More to

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/406/411 (2016-02-12)
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  • Risk Management | Auditor General of British Columbia
    identified and assessed appropriate responses e g implementing internal controls are determined and assurance is provided that the chosen responses are effective Risks are monitored and the responses are evaluated The effectiveness of the risk management system is reported publicly referring explicitly to the governing body that holds responsibility for the system The risk management system considers the full range of the organization s activities and responsibilities and continuously checks that various good management disciplines are in place Stakeholder Relationships Internal and External up Internal Compliance and Accountability Printer friendly version Managing Knowledge A guide to good practice Public Sector Governance A Guide to the Principles of Good Practice Where Should We Start How Can These Principles Be Put Into Practice How Should We Gauge our Progress and Successes Leadership Ethics and a Culture Committed to Good Public Sector Governance Stakeholder Relationships Internal and External Risk Management Internal Compliance and Accountability Planning and Performance Monitoring External Compliance and Accountability Information and Decision Support Review and Evaluation of Governance Arrangements Is There More to Good Governance Further Information Comments from the Auditor General and Chief Information Officer of B C What is knowledge and why is it critical to the B

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/406/412 (2016-02-12)
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