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  • Further Information
    Public Sector Governance A Guide to the Principles of Good Practice please click here PDF 1 1MB Contact Information Office of the Auditor General of British Columbia 8 Bastion Square

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/419 (2016-02-12)
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  • Comments from the Auditor General and Chief Information Officer of B.C.
    increasingly complex and global To meet these challenges organizations need to be resilient and flexible and public sector managers need to optimize the knowledge that exists both within and outside of their organizations We chose to produce a guide to good practices and a self assessment tool to increase awareness in B C â s public sector of the importance of thinking of knowledge as a strategic asset and assist organizations in gauging their current level of capability in managing knowledge and to take steps to achieve excellence in this area  I would like to acknowledge the many public sector managers and employees who contributed to this work especially the Office of the Chief Information Officer and the BC Forest Service The project team encountered many enthusiastic B C public sector leaders â from all levels â who provided us with valuable input and good ideas which can be seen throughout the website This guide provides a mechanism to share these good ideas and success stories to influence improvement in areas where knowledge may not be effectively managed To support effective and accountable government my Office will have a continued interest in the management of knowledge We expect to use this resource to help us evaluate the knowledge management capability of organizations In keeping with the nature of good knowledge related practices this project is completely web based â a new reporting format for this Office Given that managing knowledge is a continuous process publishing this report solely on the web enables us to adapt the content continuously I hope you enjoy the interactivity of the report and make full use of the self assessment guide to lead your officeâ s management of knowledge John Doyle MBA CA  Comments from B C s Chief Information Officer I would

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/572 (2016-02-12)
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  • Categories of knowledge | Auditor General of British Columbia
    that can be easily codified organized and stored For example an evaluation of the Federal government s employment programs stored on an intranet site is an explicit knowledge asset A policy or procedure manual is also an explicit knowledge asset Tacit knowledge and know how Tacit knowledge is more difficult to codify organize and store than explicit knowledge Related to tacit knowledge is the idea of know how This refers to knowledge of the processes and tools required to accomplish something well Know how can mean having Collison and Parcell 2004 pp 34 35 know who about networks and relationships in and out of government know what about content and specialist knowledge know why about big picture context strategy and systems thinking know where about researching and sleuthing skills and know when about timing of when to take action and when not to such as deciding to set a project aside What do we mean by knowledge up Why think of knowledge as a strategic asset Printer friendly version Managing Knowledge A guide to good practice Public Sector Governance A Guide to the Principles of Good Practice Comments from the Auditor General and Chief Information Officer of B C What

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/552/491 (2016-02-12)
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  • Why think of knowledge as a strategic asset? | Auditor General of British Columbia
    managing knowledge is in fact a core business of government and important for supporting public sector values In this way knowledge is a strategic asset The public service should be a trusted source of information Government plays a vital role in informing the public on a wide range of topics Child safety flu prevention nutrition wildfire risks and floodingare just some of the areas where information and knowledge must be shared to protect the public Given the provincial government s shifting role toward decision making and policy and away from direct delivery of services generating sharing and safeguarding knowledge is fundamental Oversight coordination and decision making require knowledge of among other things how services are delivered what impacts or trends place these services at risk and how well citizens are being served For example consider the area of highway engineering and maintenance It is the know how of highway engineers maintenance managers and others that is essential to ensuring roads and bridges are well designed can meet future demands and are adequately maintained to support public safety Simply hiring more people to do the work or bringing in extra equipment will not automatically lead to safer highways Ensuring that highly qualified and knowledgeable employees are in place to develop policy and oversee contracts is important But ensuring that there are effective ways to generate new knowledge share existing knowledge and apply that knowledge to meet business objectives and improve practices is critical The challenges of managing knowledge While the importance of knowledge assets increases knowledge remains difficult to manage effectively In KPMG s European Knowledge Management Survey for example 78 of respondents reported feeling that they were currently missing out on business opportunities by failing to successfully exploit available knowledge KPMG 2002 2003 p 4 It is likely that management

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/552/492 (2016-02-12)
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  • What is the strategic management of knowledge? | Auditor General of British Columbia
    that umbrella there can be many knowledge related activities Organizational learning intellectual capital and human capital management are terms often associated with the management of knowledge While information and data management as well as library sciences are also considered complementary to the work of managing knowledge they shouldn t be considered knowledge management The strategic management of knowledge is broader and includes human and social connections and contexts Our definition of the strategic management of knowledge For the purpose of this guide we have defined the strategic management of knowledge as a systematic approach to maximizing the generation sharing and use of knowledge to support organizational learning resilien ce and ultimately performance Such work includes strategies tools and processes that can be employed to ensure that people are connected that learning occurs at a team and organizational level and that appropriate supports including access to expertise and technology are in place to enhance decision making achieve operational efficiency and effectiveness and promote innovation Why think of knowledge as a strategic asset up Self assessment guide Printer friendly version Managing Knowledge A guide to good practice Public Sector Governance A Guide to the Principles of Good Practice Comments from the Auditor

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/552/493 (2016-02-12)
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  • What is knowledge and why is it critical to the B.C. public sector?
    how Tacit knowledge is more difficult to codify organize and store than explicit knowledge  Related to tacit knowledge is the idea of â know howâ This refers to knowledge of the processes and tools required to accomplish something well Know how can mean having Collison and Parcell 2004 pp 34â 35 know who about networks and relationships in and out of government know what about content and specialist knowledge know why about big picture context strategy and systems thinking know where about researching and sleuthing skills and know when about timing of when to take action and when not to such as deciding to set a project aside Why think of knowledge as a strategic asset A focus on knowledge as a strategic asset is important because improving the management of this asset can enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of public sector organizations and help these organizations meet the challenges of the future Many experts argue that an organizationâ s ability to perform well in the information age depends on its ability to use knowledge effectively In the private sector knowledge has become a critical source of comparative advantage as companies increasingly draw on factors such as employee knowledge and innovative capacity to remain competitive Stewart 2001 p 5 Usoff 2002 p 9 Pertson 2009 p 2 For public sector organizations improving the generation sharing and use of knowledge leads to many real benefits such as Enhanced strategic decision making Better informed policy More cost effective services Engagement of citizens and stakeholders in new and better ways Innovation Reduced redundancy for routine tasks Better knowledge flow across organizational boundaries Enhanced transfer and protection of corporate memory Improved employee engagement Better quality of information and services provided to citizens  But it is not just about benefits Successfully managing knowledge is essential for government to achieve its goals and objectives Senior managers we interviewed suggested that managing knowledge is in fact a core business of government and important for supporting public sector values In this way knowledge is a strategic asset The public service should be a trusted source of information Government plays a vital role in informing the public on a wide range of topics Child safety flu prevention nutrition wildfire risks and floodingare just some of the areas where information and knowledge must be shared to protect the public Given the provincial governmentâ s shifting role toward decision making and policy and away from direct delivery of services generating sharing and safeguarding knowledge is fundamental Oversight coordination and decision making require knowledge of â among other things â how services are delivered what impacts or trends place these services at risk and how well citizens are being served For example consider the area of highway engineering and maintenance It is the know how of highway engineers maintenance managers and others that is essential to ensuring roads and bridges are well designed can meet future demands and are adequately maintained to support public safety Simply hiring more people to

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/478 (2016-02-12)
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  • The capability model | Auditor General of British Columbia
    organizational capability through an iterative process The other three areas Networks and Communities Experiential Learning and Knowledge Base are supportive processes that contribute to this overall development Over time as organizations continue to develop these areas and staff and managers begin to value the generation and sharing of knowledge the strategic management of knowledge becomes second nature simply the way an organization carries out its business Exhibit 1 The knowledge capability model Source Developed by Office of the Auditor General of British Columbia Capability area 1 Leadership and Strategy Capability area 2 Networks and Communities Capability area 3 Experiential Learning Capability area 4 Knowledge Base Capability area 5 Culture Steps in conducting the self assessment up Capability area 1 Leadership and Strategy Printer friendly version Managing Knowledge A guide to good practice Public Sector Governance A Guide to the Principles of Good Practice Comments from the Auditor General and Chief Information Officer of B C What is knowledge and why is it critical to the B C public sector Self assessment guide Steps in conducting the self assessment The capability model Capability area 1 Leadership and Strategy Capability area 2 Networks and Communities Capability area 3 Experiential Learning Capability area

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/552/524 (2016-02-12)
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  • The maturity matrix | Auditor General of British Columbia
    matrix The maturity matrix The maturity matrix provides a brief description of four different maturity levels baseline getting started improving and advanced related to the five areas of the capability model Leadership and Strategy Networks and Communities Experiential Learning Knowledge Base and Culture It can be used by organizations to understand where they are starting and what areas to focus on to enhance their knowledge management capability It is also a useful document to review prior to completing the interactive self assessment Download the maturity matrix Capability area 5 Culture up How the guide was developed Printer friendly version Managing Knowledge A guide to good practice Public Sector Governance A Guide to the Principles of Good Practice Comments from the Auditor General and Chief Information Officer of B C What is knowledge and why is it critical to the B C public sector Self assessment guide Steps in conducting the self assessment The capability model The maturity matrix How the guide was developed Case studies Good ideas for managing knowledge from B C s public sector Tool kits Take the self assessment now Subscribe to alerts Notify me of new reports Notify me of new job postings I agree to

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/552/532 (2016-02-12)
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