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  • 6. Climate Action Team | Auditor General of British Columbia
    The Practice A B C government manager who works with the Climate Action Team in the Ministry of Agriculture and Lands has built positive working relationships across organizational and jurisdictional boundaries Thus when the CFS needed to improve their inventory of land use they turned to the Climate Action Team manager This manager was also able to use standard software and technology to enhance the knowledge base of the CFS The CFS sent Geographic Information System GIS files in a Google Earth format to the team as e mail attachments to outline their areas of interest The manager set up a collaboration using Live Meeting to include CFS and ministry staff and started up Google Earth on his computer With Live Meeting the others could see the GIS e mail attachments on his screen As he clicked on each outlined area all participants could see what CFS was asking for As they spoke the manager opened map layers from sources including the GeoBC public website and layered information such as Agricultural Land Reserve lot lines and different types of ownership over the Google Earth imagery Some questions were answered immediately Later building on what he had learned the same manager heard that a provincial agrologist in Kelowna needed key information within 20 minutes The manager used the link button on the phone to call out to a CFS specialist who might help The invite by e mail function on Live Meeting brought the agrologist into a brainstorming session and the three of them were able to assemble accurate information within the 20 minute timeframe something that would not have been possible without the networks that bridged the organizations and the knowledge sharing technology in place 5 Interior Health Authority up 7 GovSpeak Work Printer friendly version Managing Knowledge A guide

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/552/501 (2016-02-12)
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  • 7. GovSpeak@Work | Auditor General of British Columbia
    the B C government s Work site suggests there are more than 14 000 acronyms in use across the public service For new staff being asked on the first day of work something like Do you have the BN for the ADM regarding LDB regulations or Can you find the GLE for PHSA can be particularly challenging For administrative staff keeping up with changes and circulating new acronyms is a time consuming task The Practice The idea came from a director in the Ministry of Finance who recognized that there were many employees keeping and updating lists of acronyms all around the province s offices Recognizing that valuable administration time was being taken up by this task he had the idea to develop a wiki for acronyms Even though this is a simple example my philosophy is that every little bit helps and I particularly value the time and purpose of our admin staff The site is called GovSpeak and is made available across the B C government through the internal Work site GovSpeak provides one central location for access and uploads of new acronyms their definitions related links sources and contacts This simple tool can potentially save hours of administrative time and support staff in learning or keeping up with this language 6 Climate Action Team up 8 Office of the Chief Information Officer Knowledge and Information Services Branch Printer friendly version Managing Knowledge A guide to good practice Public Sector Governance A Guide to the Principles of Good Practice Comments from the Auditor General and Chief Information Officer of B C What is knowledge and why is it critical to the B C public sector Self assessment guide Case studies Good ideas for managing knowledge from B C s public sector 1 Ministry of Housing and Social Development

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/552/502 (2016-02-12)
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  • 8. Office of the Chief Information Officer – Knowledge and Information Services Branch | Auditor General of British Columbia
    is in supporting policy analysts and decision makers alike in having quick and easy access to the valuable knowledge assets available both within and external to the public service For example policy makers have limited access to academic research to inform policy In addition explicit knowledge assets developed by government such as program evaluations and research policy papers may only be accessible to a particular program area or Ministry Both of these limitations can create barriers and inefficiencies in the development of evidence informed policy The Practice It was recognized that facilitating the sharing of research and policy papers on particular issues across organizational boundaries would have benefits These benefits include reducing duplication of cost and effort as well as enhancing the speed at which evidence is available for policy making To support more evidence informed policy the KIS branch has developed The Bridge a government wide on line knowledge base to support access to knowledge assets critical to good policy making The purpose of the Bridge is to link policy related publications and organizations on issues that have a significant impact on citizens and the Province The Bridge includes a collection of resources for evidence informed policy It links to research organizations and notices of policy related upcoming events as well as to research articles including scoping reviews and other research and decision support information and resources It also acts as a gateway to an assortment of corporate subscriptions including the EBSCO Academic Search Premier pilot subscription This pilot subscription provides access to a large full text database including nearly 3 500 scholarly publications and approximately 2 600 peer reviewed publications on a range of topics from the humanities to social and medical science A corporate approach that will enable permanent access to this valuable resource for evidence informed

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/552/571 (2016-02-12)
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  • Good ideas for managing knowledge from B.C.'s public sector
    knowledge The framework helped to identify the risks associated with specific positions or groups across government by identifying the immediacy of the threat of loss e g whether someone was expected to depart within 1 year or over 5 years and the significance of the impact e g the nature and importance of the knowledge the person had and whether or not that person was actively engaged in knowledge sharing This tool was used to help identify where both immediate and long term action could be undertaken to mitigate the risks associated with knowledge loss in the governmentâ s financial roles 4 Policy Community of Practice Networks and Communities Building knowledge and relationships across organizational boundaries to improve policy work Context Over the years across the public sector several large and small communities of practice CoP have assembled to discuss topics ranging from performance management to policy work â meeting in places as formal as board rooms and as informal as pubs The Policy CoP has been a fairly long standing group that is recognized by many as a success It was first launched in 2003 chaired by Joy Illington who at the time was working as a Deputy Cabinet Secretary Challenge Policy analysts across government were isolated and had little interaction As well with government downsizing it made sense to reduce duplication and share resources to be more efficient There was also an identified need for analysts to increase their experiential learning As one interviewee said  â There is only so much that formal educational programs can teach you about policy work You need to learn from others who have done the job before â It was also clear that Cabinet and the deputy ministers expected more consistency in cabinet submissions and that cooperation amongst policy staff was needed The Practice To launch the CoP all ministry policy units were sent an invitation to attend It was recognized that whether an analyst was working on childcare or fish policy he or she shared basic skills with other analysts It was also recognized that there were common tools and approaches that could be shared to improve policy work across government The group met in various venues and worked to set a tone of empowerment There was space for each person to speak about his or her interests and opportunities to find issues that spanned multiple ministries Said Joy Illington â It didnâ t matter if you were an ADM or a junior policy analyst we worked to reduce those traditional hierarchies â because often those hierarchies are an impediment to innovation and learning â The CoP is still active in its sixth year partly because of a recognized need to rotate the convener role among interested volunteers This has helped to keep meeting agendas fresh as the community engages in learning and problem solving around topics including consultation strategies and legislation development It meets on a regular basis and has an active SharePoint site for members to access The membership now includes more junior level analysts than when it first began but as one member put it  â This is excellent the group has changed to address an identified need â 5 Interior Health Authority Experiential Learning  Learning after to enhance the culture of care in a regional hospital The following is an example of using storytelling and narrative capture as a way of learning after an event Following a sentinel event in a regional hospital at Interior Health Authority IHA a project was initiated to better understand the culture of care and compassion being practiced at the hospital and to find ways to improve patient care Context Across B C â s health system many people receive high quality care However there are times when a patient may experience an adverse effect Learning from these events is part of developing a culture of trust and continuous improvement In 2006 a sentinel event occurred at IHA which brought the health authority under intense scrutiny Several investigations were undertaken all in the spirit of improving decision making and building a culture of care and compassion Challenge Understanding and finding ways to truly understand and improve workplace culture is not an easy task and requires novel approaches In this particular case the environment and the decision making processes were complex Ultimately the staff managers and professionals involved needed to see the whole picture before they could find ways to improve their approaches attitudes and behaviours Different groups e g nurses and physicians had different perspectives on the countless number of interactions that occur on a day to day basis It became clear that the environment and decision making was not formulaic but dependent on circumstances In other words applying simple rules and policies was not going to solve the problems or support a change in culture The Practice  Working with an external consultant an organization development consultant within IHA collected approximately 400 stories from staff managers and various health care professionals involved They also collected stories from patients and families Each story teller was asked to analyze his or her own stories by answering a number of questions about the stories A software tool was used to help people see patterns that emerged from the stories A proxy group of approximately 60 people from a variety of backgrounds was then brought together in a large workshop where the participants collectively made sense of the data including the narratives and the patterns that the individuals had played a role in formulating The process provided physicians with key insights into the perspective of nurses when it came to care planning From this work emerged 30 action items that were â ownedâ by management staff or both jointly Some of these items were aimed at improving decision making processes while others were quick fixes related to equipment or facilities Many of the action items were more relational in nature â for example how to behave and speak with each other The

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/480 (2016-02-12)
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  • Definitions | Auditor General of British Columbia
    that enables people to identify knowledge experts located across the organization It categorizes knowledge experts according to their area of expertise interests and a little personal information and sometimes acts as a skills database repository It is sometimes referred to as the corporate yellow pages The purpose is to connect people to each other Source BC Forest Service 2005 06 Human Capital Management Human Capital Management also referred to as Talent Management is the ongoing process that organisations use to recruit appropriately skilled and motivated employees integrate them into their organisations develop their competences and retain their commitment Source StepStone 2010 Intellectual Capital Intellectual capital is knowledge that can be leveraged to produce value It can include the skills and knowledge an organization uses to refine its business cycle or the knowledge and skills employees apply to enhance organizational operations Irrespective of the source intellectual capital is critical to a company s continued success Organizational Learning Organizational Learning is school of thought that examines the various models and theories used to explain the methods by which an organization adapts and learns Source Argyris Schon 1978 Push Pull Capability This capability allows organizations to both absorb knowledge from others as well as communicate knowledge out Silos Organizational silos are created when units act and think independent of one another In turn information sharing is often thwarted work is commonly duplicated and individual goals are typically advanced over broader organizational ones Source WikiAnswers n d Strategic Asset A strategic asset is a value added resource that can be used to inform decision making In this context it is the combination of explicit and tacit knowledge skills and experience which exist within staff Strategic assets are often the critical determinants that enable an organization to maintain a sustainable advantage over its competitors Source Othman n d Strategic Management of Knowledge For the purpose of this guide we have defined the strategic management of knowledge as a systematic approach to maximizing the generation sharing and use of knowledge to support organizational learning resilience and ultimately performance Such work includes strategies tools and processes that can be employed to ensure that people are connected that learning occurs at a team and organizational level and that appropriate supports including access to expertise and technology are in place to enhance decision making achieve operational efficiency and effectiveness and promote innovation Strategic Risk Assessment A strategic risk assessment is one step in the risk management process The assessment involves assessing and quantifying business risks then instituting measures to control or reduce them Source Kolakowsi n d Tacit Knowledge and Know How Tacit knowledge is more difficult to codify organize and store than explicit knowledge Related to tacit knowledge is the concept of know how this refers to knowledge of the processes and tools required to accomplish something well Know how that is tacit knowledge can mean having Collison and Parcell 2004 pp 34 35 know who about networks and relationships in and out of government know what about

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/552/504 (2016-02-12)
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  • Potential barriers and disincentives | Auditor General of British Columbia
    documents electronically Technology related policies standards If there are no standards or people do not follow them data and information cannot be easily integrated to support decision making If employees need to get permission for long distance calls or cannot use familiar social technologies or media knowledge sharing will be hampered or will go underground Job descriptions and unions If employees are constrained to work within job descriptions or union levels self censorship or others not knowing about their expertise or controls from above opportunities for innovation and improvement may be lost Performance plans ignoring work with knowledge as an asset If employees are not rewarded for collaborative knowledge sharing behavior and they are rewarded for competitive knowledge hoarding behavior strategies will not translate to improvements Performance plans emphasizing quick decisions and following orders Knowledge develops through processes such as problem definition and meaningful conversation in no blame environments Quick decisions are important for some situations but quick decisions for the wrong actions implemented in the wrong way or at the wrong time will require extensive repair work Punishment or lack of reward If the employee who sits alone in a cubicle all day is promoted instead of the colleague who enables connections and conversations for better outcomes word will spread quickly and innovations will decrease Lack of policy or information Even if intentions or strategies are excellent progress may be stalled through uncertainty Does a senior manager really want diverse input when she asks for ideas Can an employee bring ideas from communities of practice in which he participates in the evening as a private individual Can a manager share lessons learned in a conference discussion Limited experience unknown unknowns Does a career natural scientist understand how to work with a policy analyst and vice versa Does an employee

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/552/505 (2016-02-12)
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  • Bibliography | Auditor General of British Columbia
    2002 Knowledge Management Has Many Facets Retrieved August 16 2009 from kwork org The Association of Knowledgework http kwork org stars Four KM Facets pdf CAPABILITY AREA 2 NETWORKS AND COMMUNITIES Anklam P 2008 Net Work A Practical Guide to Creating and Sustaining Networks at Work and in the World Retrieved 2009 23 October from Making networks work at work and in the world http www pattianklam com network html Callahan S 2006 Techniques for Expertise Locator Retrieved October 23 2009 from Anecdote Whitepapers http www anecdote com au whitepapers php wpid 13 Canadian Health Services Research Foundation n d Knowledge Exchange Retrieved October 23 2009 from Network Notes http www chsrf ca knowledge transfer networks notes e php Charam R 1991 How Networks Reshape Organizations for Results In R Howard The Learning Imperative Managing People for Continous Innovation pp 111 129 A Harvard Business Review Book Cross R Parker A Prusak L and Borgatti S 2001 Knowing What We Know Supporting Knowledge Creating and Sharing in Social Networks Organizational Dynamics Dixon N Allen N Burgess T Kilner P and Schweitzer S 2005 Company Command Unleashing the Power of the Army Profession West Point The Centre for the Advancement of Leader Development and Organizational Learning MacGillivray A 2009 Knowledge Intensive Work in a Network of Counter Terrorism Communities The Handbook of Research on Knowledge Intensive Organizations Edited Authored by J Kociatkiewicz D Jemielniak eds Hershey IGI Global National Aeronautics and Space Administration n d NASA Team Collaboration Retrieved October 23 2009 from Federal Knowledge Management Working Group KMWG http wiki nasa gov cm wiki id 1926 Open Space n d Welcome to Open Space Retrieved October 23 2009 from OpenSpaceWorld http www openspaceworld org Owen H n d A Brief User s Guide to Open Space Technology Retrieved October 23 2009 from Opening Space for Peace and High Performance http www openspaceworld com users guide htm Reinelt C 2008 May 22 Leadership Learning Community Retrieved October 23 2009 from Social Network Analysis and the Evaluation of Leadership Networks http leadershiplearning org blog claire reinelt 2008 05 22 social network analysis and evaluation leadership networks Rumizen M 2002 The Complete Idiots Guide to Knowledge Management Madison CWL Publishing Enterpises Snowden D 2002 Complex Acts of Knowing Paradox and Descriptive Self Awareness Journal of Knowledge Management 100 112 Stewart T A 2001 Intellectual Captial New York Double Day Wenger E n d Etienne Wenger Publications Retrieved October 23 2009 from Books http www ewenger com pub index htm Wenger E White N and Smith J D 2009 Digital Habits Stewarding Technology for Communities Portland CPsquare Wheatley M 2006 Leadership and the New Science Discovering Order in a Chaotic World San Francisco Berrett Koehler Wheatley M and Kellner Rogers M 1996 A Simpler Way San Francisco Berrett Koehler CAPABILITY AREA 3 EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING Bailey T 2007 July 17 Tell Us Your Story Cultivating an Organizational Storytelling Culture Retrieved October 23 2009 from Slideshare http www slideshare net whatidiscover tell us your story Bailey

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/552/506 (2016-02-12)
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  • Tool kits
    employees leave Administrative boundaries around government Limits experience and skill development Limits capacity building through work with the private sector not for profits other levels of government including First Nations other provinces or countries communities colleges and universities Hierarchies Isolates insights and innovations in different levels of the organization Connected to styles of formal leaders Technological systems If systems do not connect well it decreases the likelihood of people communicating and sharing documents electronically Technology related policies standards If there are no standards or people do not follow them data and information cannot be easily integrated to support decision making If employees need to get permission for long distance calls or cannot use familiar social technologies or media knowledge sharing will be hampered or will go underground Job descriptions and unions If employees are constrained to work within job descriptions or union levels self censorship or others not knowing about their expertise or controls from above opportunities for innovation and improvement may be lost Performance plans ignoring work with knowledge as an asset If employees are not rewarded for collaborative knowledge sharing behavior and they are rewarded for competitive knowledge hoarding behavior strategies will not translate to improvements Performance plans emphasizing quick decisions and following orders Knowledge develops through processes such as problem definition and meaningful conversation in no blame environments Quick decisions are important for some situations but quick decisions for the wrong actions implemented in the wrong way or at the wrong time will require extensive repair work Punishment or lack of reward If the employee who sits alone in a cubicle all day is promoted instead of the colleague who enables connections and conversations for better outcomes word will spread quickly and innovations will decrease Lack of policy or information Even if intentions or strategies are excellent progress may be stalled through uncertainty Does a senior manager really want diverse input when she asks for ideas Can an employee bring ideas from communities of practice in which he participates in the evening as a private individual Can a manager share lessons learned in a conference discussion Limited experience unknown unknowns Does a career natural scientist understand how to work with a policy analyst and vice versa Does an employee know that he has counterparts with very different job titles in several other ministries Does an executive know how powerful problem solving and learning can be across fields disciplines that seem very different  Bibliography KEY JOURNALS Journal of Knowledge Management http info emeraldinsight com products journals journals htm id jkm Journal of Intellectual Capital http www emeraldinsight com Insight viewContainer do containerType Journal containerId 11322 Knowledge Management for Development Journal http www tandf co uk journals titles 19474199 asp Knowledge Management Research and Practice http www palgrave journals com kmrp index html Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management http www ejkm com GENERAL REFERENCES Gurteen D 2009 Gurteen Knowledge Retrieved October 23 2009 from Gurteen Knowledge  http www gurteen com Gorelick C Milton N and April K 2004 Performance Through Learning Knowledge Management in Practice Burlington Elsevier Butterworth Heinemann Greenes K 2003 De Mystifying Knowledge Management The Conference Board of Canada pp 1 55 Banff Knowledge Strategy Council Lelic S 2002 Inside Knowledge Editorial Knowledge Management 4 McElroy M 2003 The New Knowledge Management Complexity Learning and Sustainable Innovation Burlington Butterworth Heinemann Peterson T 2009 Waddayaknow Knowledge Management Can be an Organization s Key to Survival Conference Board of Canada Wiig K M 2004 People Focused Knowledge Management How Effective Decision Making Leads to Corporate Success Burlington Elsevier Butterworth Heinemann CAPABILITY AREA 1  LEADERSHIP AND STRATEGY Allee V 2003 The Future of Knowledge Increasing Prosperity Through Value Networks Burlington Butterwort Association of Knowledgework n d Conversation with Karl Erik Sveiby Retrieved October 23 2009 from Star Series http kwork org Stars sveiby conv html Learning   Bennet A 2004 Organizational Survival in the New World The Intelligent Complex Adaptive System Burlington Butterworth Heinemann Bontis N 2000 Assessing Knowledge Assets A Review of the Models Used to Measure Intellectual Capital Hamilton Michael G DeGroote School of Business McMaster University  Callahan S Schenk M and Kapur C 2008 Crafting a Knowledge Strategy That Works Retrieved October 23 2009 from Anecdote Whitepapers http www anecdote com au papers AnecdoteCraftingStrategy v1s pdf  Collison C and Parcell G 2001 2004 Learning to Fly Practical Knowledge Management from Leading and Learning Organizations Chichester Capstone Publishing Wiley  Davenport T H and Prusak L 1998 Working Knowledge How Organizations Manage What They Know Boston Harvard Business School Press  Gibby P J BP Milton N Palen W A  and Hensley S E 2006 Implementing a Framework for Knowledge Management Society of Petroleum Engineers  Greenes K and Piktailis D 2008 July Bridging the Gaps How to Transfer Knowledge in Today s Multigenerational Workplace Retrieved October 23 2009 from The Conference Board of Canada http sso conferenceboard ca documents aspx did 2663   Gurteen D 1999 Evangelising Knowledge Management Knowledge Management Conference London www gurteen com  Gurteen D n d Measuring the Value of KM Retrieved October 23 2009 from slideshare http www slideshare net dgurteen measuring the value of km   Handzic M Lagumdzija A and Celjo A 2008 Auditing Knowledge Management Practices Model and Application Knowledge Management Research and Practice 90 99  KPMG 2002 2003 Insights from KPMG s European Knowledge Management Survey  Kulkarni U A 2004 Measuring Knowledge Management Capabilities Tempe AZ W P Carey School of Business Arizona State University  Lambe P 2007 September 08 How to Use KPIs in Knowledge Management Retrieved October 23 2009 from Green Chameleon Straits Knowledge http www greenchameleon com gc blog detail how to use kpis in knowledge management    Pasher E n d Association of Knowledgework Retrieved October 23 2009 from Strategic Renewal The Key Link Between KM and Organizations http kwork org Stars pasher html    Schenk M Callahan S and Rixon A 2006 Our Take on How

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/481 (2016-02-12)
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