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  • Take the self-assessment now
    highly recommend that users review the self assessment guide  prior to taking the interactive self assessment If you are ready to assess your organization s knowledge capability click here

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/551 (2016-02-12)
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  • What do we mean by knowledge? | Auditor General of British Columbia
    to determine whether a policy change regarding the marketing of B C wines has had a positive effect on the industry She starts by reviewing a table of numbers on the sale of B C wine in the province over the last three years The table contains data The analyst reads these numbers and creates a trend line that shows that B C wine sales have steadily increased over the three year period but most notably after the policy was implemented The data has been transformed to information To come up with possible explanations for the increase in sales the analyst considers additional information speaks with known wine producers and distributers and consults with an expert she met at a conference After examining all this information and using her own knowledge and judgment she concludes that the efforts to market local wine expanded significantly because of the policy change and this in turn has positively influenced sales In this scenario the policy analyst used both existing knowledge and generated new knowledge She applied her know how to reach an understanding of a particular issue By turning data into information using her existing knowledge to tap into stakeholders and other information sources considering the industry knowledge obtained from those sources and reflecting on all of this she came to her conclusion In effect she generated new knowledge Davenport and Prusak 1998 What is knowledge and why is it critical to the B C public sector up Categories of knowledge Printer friendly version Managing Knowledge A guide to good practice Public Sector Governance A Guide to the Principles of Good Practice Comments from the Auditor General and Chief Information Officer of B C What is knowledge and why is it critical to the B C public sector What do we mean by

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/552/490 (2016-02-12)
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  • Practice guides | Auditor General of British Columbia
    Tool kits Practice guides Practice guides The following practice guides provide further details of how to implement many of the actions and suggestions in the self assessment guide Capability Area 1 Leadership and Strategy Practice Guide 1 Strategy Design Practice Guide 2 Metrics Capability Area 2 Networks and Communities Practice Guide 3 Networks and Communities Practice Guide 4 Community of Practice Capability Area 3 Experiential Learning Practice Guide 5 Peer Assist Practice Guide 6 Informal Action Review Practice Guide 7 Storytelling and Work with Narrative Capability Area 4 Knowledge Base Practice Guide 1 Knowledge Repository Tool kits up Definitions Printer friendly version Managing Knowledge A guide to good practice Public Sector Governance A Guide to the Principles of Good Practice Comments from the Auditor General and Chief Information Officer of B C What is knowledge and why is it critical to the B C public sector Self assessment guide Case studies Good ideas for managing knowledge from B C s public sector Tool kits Practice guides Definitions Potential barriers and disincentives Bibliography Take the self assessment now Subscribe to alerts Notify me of new reports Notify me of new job postings I agree to receive email from the Auditor General

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/552/503 (2016-02-12)
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  • 1. Ministry of Housing and Social Development Review Boards | Auditor General of British Columbia
    with social development and support to assist all British Columbians in achieving their economic potential Service Plan 2009 10 It employs approximately 2 700 people in a variety of roles and settings Challenge Like many other public sector organizations the ministry was challenged by the need to identify and develop future leaders while ensuring that mission critical knowledge was not lost when staff retired The Practice The ministry had adopted the process of using review boards through which to conduct performance evaluations of managers and supervisors In 2008 09 this practice won a Premier s award The review board starts with supervisors who assess their staff This performance evaluation is then brought forward to a ministry wide committee What is unique about this process is that it identifies what knowledge the employee has and whether or not there is a need to transfer this knowledge provides the ministry with an organization wide perspective of their specialists their senior high performers and those with potential for future leadership positions allows the ministry to identify where knowledge may be at risk provides an opportunity to build capacity for the future and allows staff and managers alike to think beyond their particular work units Good ideas for managing knowledge from B C s public sector up 2 Ministry of Transportation Printer friendly version Managing Knowledge A guide to good practice Public Sector Governance A Guide to the Principles of Good Practice Comments from the Auditor General and Chief Information Officer of B C What is knowledge and why is it critical to the B C public sector Self assessment guide Case studies Good ideas for managing knowledge from B C s public sector 1 Ministry of Housing and Social Development Review Boards 2 Ministry of Transportation 3 Financial Key Stream Project 4 Policy

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/552/496 (2016-02-12)
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  • The BC Forest Service: Mobilizing knowledge in a complex and unpredictable environment | Auditor General of British Columbia
    range of experts and resource material and helped to move the organization forward Diverse high quality feedback was included and opportunity for learning and adjustment was provided The Strategic Conversation was a ministry wide initiative where all staff were asked to develop scenarios about the future of the BC Forest Service This process generated about 1 800 scenarios about the future from across the province The conversation itself helped ready the organization for change and drew out knowledge from across different levels in different regions These scenarios are stored in a database and are currently being used to support new business transformation efforts Employees spoke about the value of this work saying the organization could never have realized transformation without these initial steps that shifted culture over several years Networks and Communities Efforts to stimulate networks and decrease degrees of separation were built into many of the Forest Service s business initiatives The proposal for a major overhaul of policy process in 2005 was one of the first to show strong knowledge management links in some of the expected benefits it listed such as better ability to demonstrate results provides opportunity to identify horizontal linkages between divisions and branches allows executive the opportunity to focus more time on strategic linkages instead of responding to one off issues creates a platform to engage with other ministries taps unknown resources in the ministry for good ideas anyone can submit an idea intent is to build a community of practice on policy within the ministry to ensure best practices are built into ministry work and a policy website that can offer other features for skill development such as access to best practice guidelines and how to checklists for policy development Source BC Forest Service Communities and networks are part of the BC Forest Service strategy One senior manager we interviewed considered them the most important elements of the organization s work with knowledge as a strategic asset There are many internal communities of practice and some that go beyond the ministry Among the functions they serve is providing professional development promoting knowledge creation and enabling new or shared knowledge to flow into vertical structures As one employee stated Communities and networks have helped to reduce duplication It used to be common to find a few people in different branches working on the same policy issues That rarely if ever happens now Many communities within the BC Forest Service appear to have become stewards of knowledge For example the policy community has been actively involved with improving content knowledge and know how around good strategic policy development and deployment as well as building a central repository for policy The policy community has been particularly valuable as much policy work is undertaken by subject matter experts dispersed throughout the organization This community provides a way of connecting people and moving their knowledge across organizational boundaries without needing to change their position within the organization Experiential Learning Cycles of learning and development of new knowledge are

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/552/494 (2016-02-12)
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  • BP: Knowledge mobilized across silos to support success
                 Source Adapted with permission from a presentation by Greenes 2003  The central concept is the effective use of knowledge to support business goals and improve business results BP developed the â learning before during and afterâ concept which many other organizations have adopted In BPâ s terms a peer assist is a good tool for learning before an action review helps learning during and a retrospect supports learning after something is completed In some cases it is appropriate to document and store information that emerges in these processes as explicit knowledge assets Greenes 2003 suggests that most effort be invested in peer to peer and community connections But he acknowledges that it is worthwhile to try to capture some critical knowledge or organizational doctrine BPâ s knowledge repository which serves a different purpose than regular files for payroll or travel is a very attractive database with innovators featured in photos videos and stories Users can click to read or see more and they can contact an individual to learn more about how to improve their unitâ s work by learning from the improvements Employees at BP connected with each other and the knowledge base through the intranet discussion forums and expertise locators Because BPâ s many communities span organizational boundaries and connect different functions and geographic locations they were viewed as the glue holding the people and processes together Greenes 2003 pp 32â 33 One of the biggest challenges for knowledge managers is to find successful ways of working with organizational silos as important know how is often trapped within work units  When a member of the public used the BP website to ask Lord Browne about how BP works with knowledge management part of his reply addressed this challenge â Our experience has shown that an organization based on a federation of self standing business units is very good for delivering financial performance but is not ideal for transferring know how around the companyâ as quoted in Collison and Parcell 2001 p 45 Exhibit 5 shows how knowledgeable successful units in the organization are expected to bring other units up to their level for the benefit of the whole organization and its customers These achievements provided a new plateau from which performance can be further improved Exhibit 5 Fostering Knowledge Flow for Performance at BP Source Adapted with permission from Greenes 2003 Networks and Communities Communities of practice CoPs are central to BPâ s approaches They span boundaries and are more agile than formal structures Competencies grow in a CoP as Exhibit 4 shows No traditional corporate structure regardless of how decluttered and delayered can muster up the speed flexibility and focus that success today demands Networks are faster smarter and more flexible Charan 1991 Far more organizational knowledge is in peopleâ s heads than in documents databases videos and files As Collison and Parcell 2004 p 138 explain â Networks are the best

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/495 (2016-02-12)
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  • Publications: 2015 | Auditor General of British Columbia
    This report was discussed by the Legislative Assembly s Select Standing Committee on Public Accounts on June 3 2015 Integrated Case Management System March 2015 Looks at access and data quality management as well as implementation scope and costs in ICM the main IT system for social services This report was discussed by the Legislative Assembly s Select Standing Committee on Public Accounts on June 4 2015 An Audit of the Adult Custody Division s Correctional Facilities and Programs January 2015 This audit assesses whether the Adult Custody Division is planning for and providing the facilities and programs it needs to meet its mandate It contains eight recommendations This report was discussed by the Legislative Assembly s Select Standing Committee on Public Accounts on April 29 2015 Distinguishing Between Government Program Partisan Political Advertising An Update to Our 1996 Report November 2014 Looks at the importance of distinguishing between government advertisements for the purpose of informing citizens versus partisan political advertisements Recommendations include providing guidance in this area to civil servants This report was discussed by the Legislative Assembly s Select Standing Committee on Public Accounts on February 5 2015 The 2014 Summary Financial Statements and the Auditor General s Findings October 2014 This annual report reviews government s 2013 14 summary financial statements as well as explains the Auditor General s Audit Opinion A new section this year looks at the bigger picture of the statements This report was discussed by the Legislative Assembly s Select Standing Committee on Public Accounts on December 8 2014 Pages first previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next last Find a publication Keywords Start date Year Year 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/pubs/all?page=1 (2016-02-12)
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  • Publications: 2015 | Auditor General of British Columbia
    reports and contains a follow up to our 2011 report on BC Hydro This report was discussed by the Legislative Assembly s Select Standing Committee on Public Accounts on February 4 2015 and June 4 2015 Understanding Canadian Public Sector Financial Statements June 2014 This guide is to help readers specifically those who are not familiar with public sector financial statements improve their ability to review and interpret government financial reports An article based on this report appears in CPA BC s In Focus Magazine Sept Oct 2014 on pages 32 and 33 Disability Assistance An Audit of Program Access Integrity and Results May 2014 The audit looked at the accessibility of the disability assistance program the accuracy and timeliness of eligibility decisions and whether the program contributes to improved outcomes for clients This report was discussed by the Legislative Assembly s Select Standing Committee on Public Accounts on October 1 2014 Receiving Value for Money from Procured Professional and Advisory Services May 2014 This audit emphasizes the importance of government ensuring its procurement practices and policies are fair and consistently achieve the right services at the right price and time This report was discussed by the Legislative Assembly s Select Standing Committee on Public Accounts on December 8 2014 Credit Union Supervision in British Columbia March 2014 This audit determines whether the method and extent of the supervision of the province s credit unions are appropriate including whether the Financial Institutions Commission uses an appropriate supervisory framework for monitoring BC Credit Unions This report was discussed by the Legislative Assembly s Select Standing Committee on Public Accounts on September 30 2014 Pages first previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next last Find a publication Keywords Start date Year Year 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/pubs/all?page=2 (2016-02-12)
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