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  • Design: Questions for key stakeholders to consider | Auditor General of British Columbia
    Given that changes in the transport system and travel behaviour take time have reasonable timelines been set to achieve targets and outcomes Can the strategies developed to achieve objectives be sustained over time 3 Do we fully understand the important factors that influence British Columbians satisfaction with transit services and their travel mode choices this may differ by region and community 4 Which of these factors are within the control of BC Transit The Ministry Local governments 5 Are the benefits greater than the costs of the option s being considered to change transportation behaviour 6 If demand increases as a result of policy disincentives to automobile use or other transit incentives or motivating factors will the quantity quality and affordability of transit services be sufficient to meet and sustain demand Customer satisfaction with BC Transit services up Looking Ahead Printer friendly version Shaping Transit s Future in British Columbia Auditor General Comments Response from BC Transit and Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure Introduction Shaping the Future Policy and Governance Shaping the Future Funding Shaping the Future Design of Public Transit Services BC Transit s measurement and monitoring of progress Transit s performance results Strategies to achieve goals Customer satisfaction

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/812/833 (2016-02-12)
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  • Shaping the Future: Design of Public Transit Services
    the Provincial Transit Plan for ridership and mode share by 2020  Across the province they calculated that this would mean an average annual ridership growth of 5 percentâ although the expectation was that growth would not be linear It was expected that new transit initiatives such as rapid transit would lead to spikes in ridership These were not explicitly modelled in the projections because of lack of certainty regarding when new initiatives would be complete In 2012 the Office of the Auditor General completed an Audit of BC Transit s Ridership Growth Since the Launch of the 2008 Provincial Transit Plan  We found that BC Transitâ s ridership growth during this period was 27 percent lower than it projected needing to meet the Provincial Transit Plan target by 2020 In 2012 13 there was a drop in ridership which BC Transit attributes to service reductions in a number of communities across the province as well as a labour disruption in Victoria during the last half of the year This translated to BC Transitâ s ridership growth being 40 percent lower than it projected needing to meet the Provincial Transit Plan target by 2020 Moving forward BC Transit has adjusted their forecasts to anticipate a lower growth trend for the next three years leaving a gap of 46 percent by 2015  Figure 15 BC Transit ridership targets and forecasts versus actual results click image to enlarge Given the lower forecast for ridership BC Transit will be challenged to meet the 2020 milestone As a consequence it will also take longer to realize the sustainability outcomes associated with a mode share shift from automobile to transit While BC Transit is not measuring mode share the Capital Regional Districtâ s travel survey results show that there was a slight decrease in transit riders between the last survey in 2006 and the most recent one in 2011 Nonetheless there was an increase in sustainable transportation modes overall due to an increase in walking which led to a slight decrease in automobile use  Figure 16 Victoria travel mode shares 2006 and 2011 click image to enlarge To consider  Given that changes in the transport system and travel behaviour take time have reasonable timelines been set to achieve targets and outcomes  Can the strategies developed to achieve objectives be sustained over time Strategies to achieve goals In order to increase ridership and transit mode share and meet the ultimate goals of reducing greenhouse gas emissions and traffic congestion a portion of the population who primarily use an automobile for transportation will need to make alternative travel choices This target group is referred to as â choiceâ riders because they have other options for transportation and will only choose to use transit if they see it as a better option than their single occupant vehicle Text box P  Captive vs choice riders click to read Some people who use public transit have no other options to meet their transportation needs and are therefore dependent on public transit e g school students people without a car or a license or mobility issues These people are referred to as â captiveâ transit riders When people have a car or other means of transportation available to them but make an active choice to use public transportation they are considered â choiceâ riders Because they have other choices for their travel they will normally choose public transportation only when it is perceived to be better than their other choices This perception could be based on many factors cost comfort convenience travel time socializing or ethics Figure 17  Potential and actual transit ridership groups click to read BC Transitâ s customer satisfaction survey results 2013 show that province wide 53 percent of people surveyed commute to work or school and have a vehicle available for these trips if they need it  To reduce greenhouse gas emissions transit promoters could target these people to convince them to make that choice of transit over vehicle use Figure 17 a Potential transit commuters in B C click image to enlarge However not everyone has the option of giving up their vehicle for their commute Over one third of the commuters surveyed reported that their employment requires them to use their own vehicle  The remaining two thirds of â choiceâ commuters however would be a potential target group for BC Transit to try to convert Potential â captiveâ commuter population On average across British Columbia 6 percent of people surveyed by BC Transit in 2012 13 do not have a vehicle available to them for work or school commuting This largely comprises the â captiveâ transit rider group although some of these people might commute by walking cycling or carpooling rather than transit  The highest proportion of this group almost one third is in the 15 24 year old age bracket 29 percent in 2012 Victoria and Whistler have a higher proportion of the population without access to a vehicle for commuting to work or school with 10 11 percent in this â captiveâ population group Connected with this trend is that Victorians Whistlerites and those living in Tier 3 communities have fewer cars per household 1 8 or 1 9 cars than others in the province 2 cars Potential â choiceâ and â captiveâ populations in the Capital Regional District â beyond commuting Looking beyond commuting travel and considering all trips taken the picture is quite different Within the Capital Regional District area according to the Origin and Destination Study 2011 just over one third of all non vehicle trips were taken by â choiceâ in that a vehicle was available to the traveler For the remaining two thirds a vehicle was not available so that traveler was â captiveâ to transit walking or cycling  This suggests that there is a fairly large pool of potential â captiveâ population that could ride transit in Victoria It helps to explain that 11 percent of

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/826 (2016-02-12)
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  • Looking Ahead
    or implementing their Transportation Master Plans and Official Community Plans Together these plans set the vision for transportation and sustainability in their communities BC Transit is working with all partners on performance reporting long term budgeting and other items related to recent report recommendations and their own strategic plan vision It is important that decision makers continue to consider the long term policy questions as they make plans and decisions

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/837 (2016-02-12)
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  • Questions for Key Stakeholders to Consider
    integrated 8 How are transit goals integrated into the overall vision for transportation in B C  9 What are the potential impacts of other government initiatives and activities on the achievement of transit objectives If these may have a negative impact how can conflicting priorities be reconciled  10 What capacity does each partner require people skills knowledge and resources to deliver their required contributions and what organizational structure is most appropriate Funding 1 What is the most appropriate funding model for BC Transit to meet long term transit goals and objectives 2 Are existing funding commitments and sources sustainable given the long term objectives and timeframes targeted 3 What long term funding commitments are required to facilitate effective and efficient long term planning 4 What is the capacity of the transit supply industry to produce additional buses or respond to demand for different types of buses to meet transit expansion plans 5 How can transit funding sources be designed to achieve the greatest positive influence on transportation behaviour Design 1 What measurements are best suited for monitoring progress toward meeting the governmentâ s ultimate goals for public transit 2 Given that changes in the transport system and travel

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/838 (2016-02-12)
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  • BC Transit funding sources | Auditor General of British Columbia
    following cost sharing Figure 9 Transit cost sharing formula click image to enlarge For an explanation of different types of transit see Text Box A Victoria s conventional transit system receives a lower provincial share because there is a fuel tax that supplements funding for the system Over the past five years since the announcement of the Provincial Transit Plan transit expansion has been impacted by the ability of either the Province or local governments to fund its share of a proposed transit expansion Overall the provincial government s proportion of transit funding has generally increased since 2008 Figure 10 Changes in BC Transit funding sources click image to enlarge British Columbia s provincial government is above the Canadian average in its contributions to transit operating revenues Text box I Transit funding sources Comparison of British Columbia to the Canadian average click to read Transit funding is fairly complex and varies greatly across the country making it challenging to develop clear comparisons between transit agencies in different provinces Nonetheless some comparisons have been made that can provide insight into differences between provincial approaches British Columbia s government is one of five Canadian provinces and territories that provides operating funding for conventional transit From the chart we see that the provincial contribution in B C is higher than the Canadian average while the proportion provided by municipal contribution is roughly similar and the proportion covered by passenger fares is lower in B C than the average Text box I a Source of transit operating revenues click image to enlarge If we look at the funding sources on a per capita basis however the figures suggest that British Columbia s municipalities are among the lowest contributors in Canada This emphasizes the high level of provincial funding for operating costs in British Columbia

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/812/822 (2016-02-12)
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  • Publications: 2011 | Auditor General of British Columbia
    plan for the upcoming years The Status of Enterprise Risk Management in the Government Ministries of British Columbia June 2011 This audit examined risk management RM and enterprise wide risk management ERM in B C government ministries from three angles The report was discussed by the Legislative Assembly s Select Standing Committee on Public Accounts on June 11 2012 Audit of the Academic Ambulatory Care Centre Public Private Partnership Vancouver Coastal Health Authority May 2011 This audit assessed whether the Academic Ambulatory Care Centre P3 project has achieved its value for money goals based on the first five years of the project agreement It also makes recommendations for future public private partnership projects The report was discussed by the Legislative Assembly s Select Standing Committee on Public Accounts on June 27 2011 Unqualified Audit Opinions Are Important May 2011 This additional report is to explain clearly the significance of issuing a qualified audit report Follow up Report Updates on the implementation of recommendations from recent reports April 2011 April 2011 This follow up report contains the self assessed progress of ministries and organizations in implementing the Auditor General s recommendations The report was discussed by the Legislative Assembly s Select Standing Committee on Public Accounts on June 27 2011 Pages first previous 1 2 Find a publication Keywords Start date Year Year 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 End date Year Year 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/pubs/2011/this.href%2C?page=1 (2016-02-12)
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  • Special Audit Report to the Speaker: Financial Framework Supporting the Legislative Assembly | Auditor General of British Columbia
    Report to the Speaker Financial Framework Supporting the Legislative Assembly Date April 1 2007 Report OAGBC Legislative Assembly Backgrounder BG OAGBC Legislative Assembly Other Files Follow up 1 OAGBC Legislative Assembly Oct 08 Follow up 2 OAGBC Legislative Assembly Oct 09 News Release NR OAGBC Legislative Assembly Find a publication Keywords Start date Year Year 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 End date Year Year 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 Subject Any Annual Reports Education Environment Natural Resources Finance Follow up Reports Forestry Governance Accountability Health Information Technology Justice Public Safety Knowledge Management Miscellaneous Procurement Social Services Transportation Publications Resource Centre Quick Links What is a financial audit What is a performance audit Subscribe to alerts Notify me of new reports Notify me of new job postings

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/pubs/2007/report1/special-audit-report-speaker-financial-framework-supporti (2016-02-12)
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  • The Child and Youth Mental Health Plan: A Promising Start to Meeting an Urgent Need | Auditor General of British Columbia
    help young persons with mental illnesses The report was discussed by the Legislative Assembly s Select Standing Committee on Public Accounts on November 20 2007 Report child and youth mental health plan pdf Other Files rpt2cymhreportjune212007 pdf child and youth mental health plan promising start urgent need june 2007 pdf 3 child and youth mental health plan june 08 2nd pdf News Release child and youth mental health plan news release pdf Find a publication Keywords Start date Year Year 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 End date Year Year 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 Subject Any Annual Reports Education Environment Natural Resources Finance Follow up Reports Forestry Governance Accountability Health Information Technology Justice Public Safety Knowledge Management Miscellaneous Procurement Social Services Transportation Publications Resource Centre Quick

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/pubs/2007/report2/child-youth-mental-health-plan (2016-02-12)
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