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  • External Compliance and Accountability
    statement is published on whether or not standards or codes of governance have been adopted This statement should identify the standards or codes adopted whether compliance has been achieved with them and if not in what respect there has not been compliance and why The interest and confidence of the public and service users are encouraged and maintained through relationship and dialogue building The organization as a whole seeks and

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/415 (2016-02-12)
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  • Information and Decision Support
    both external and internal accountabilities as well as major organizational decisions The organization develops strong and robust record keeping and file management systems Clear objectives are stated for decisions Information is tailored to the functions of the governing body Information is directly relevant to the decisions the governing body has to make is timely and objective and gives clear explanations of technical issues and their implications Professional advice on legal

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/416 (2016-02-12)
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  • Review and Evaluation of Governance Arrangements
    on an ongoing basis and led internally As well external reviews should be completed at intervals to give the organization the benefit of outside objectivity and expertise Controls are reviewed as part of a continuous improvement process Risks are monitored

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/417 (2016-02-12)
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  • Where Should We Start?
    Good governance is underpinned by five core principles An organization that uses good governance is one that always in word and action demonstrates accountability leadership integrity stewardship and transparency the

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/407 (2016-02-12)
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  • Categories of knowledge
    For example an evaluation of the Federal governmentâ s employment programs stored on an intranet site is an explicit knowledge asset A policy or procedure manual is also an explicit knowledge asset Tacit knowledge and know how Tacit knowledge is more difficult to codify organize and store than explicit knowledge  Related to tacit knowledge is the idea of â know howâ This refers to knowledge of the processes and

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/491 (2016-02-12)
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  • Why think of knowledge as a strategic asset?
    Better knowledge flow across organizational boundaries Enhanced transfer and protection of corporate memory Improved employee engagement Better quality of information and services provided to citizens  But it is not just about benefits Successfully managing knowledge is essential for government to achieve its goals and objectives Senior managers we interviewed suggested that managing knowledge is in fact a core business of government and important for supporting public sector values In this way knowledge is a strategic asset The public service should be a trusted source of information Government plays a vital role in informing the public on a wide range of topics Child safety flu prevention nutrition wildfire risks and floodingare just some of the areas where information and knowledge must be shared to protect the public Given the provincial governmentâ s shifting role toward decision making and policy and away from direct delivery of services generating sharing and safeguarding knowledge is fundamental Oversight coordination and decision making require knowledge of â among other things â how services are delivered what impacts or trends place these services at risk and how well citizens are being served For example consider the area of highway engineering and maintenance It is the know how of highway engineers maintenance managers and others that is essential to ensuring roads and bridges are well designed can meet future demands and are adequately maintained to support public safety Simply hiring more people to do the work or bringing in extra equipment will not automatically lead to safer highways Ensuring that highly qualified and knowledgeable employees are in place to develop policy and oversee contracts is important But ensuring that there are effective ways to generate new knowledge share existing knowledge and apply that knowledge to meet business objectives and improve practices is critical The challenges of managing

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/492 (2016-02-12)
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  • What is the strategic management of knowledge?
    and human capital management are terms often associated with the management of knowledge While information and data management as well as library sciences are also considered complementary to the work of managing knowledge they shouldnâ t be considered knowledge management The strategic management of knowledge is broader and includes human and social connections and contexts Our definition of the strategic management of knowledge For the purpose of this guide we

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/493 (2016-02-12)
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  • Capability area 2: Networks and Communities | Auditor General of British Columbia
    has already been done and so there is no need to reinvent the wheel Communities of practice CoPs are one such network They are relatively nimble and responsive and can be used for rapid learning across boundaries In BP these are the glue that holds different systems in the corporation together The BC Forest Service also includes a number of strategies to stimulate networks in order to move knowledge quickly across the silos Organizations can also support developing expertise networks through business processes and technologies For example an expertise locator can be used to identify specialized knowledge that may not be visible in a job description The assessment questions Networks and Community In this capability area the questions help organizations assess the extent to which networks and communities are becoming a way of doing business that is emerging in response to business needs and effective in sharing and generating knowledge and specialized expertise Both senior and middle managers should consider these questions Do employees with expertise and in need of expertise participate in cross boundary groups and form networks to generate and share knowledge Do groups such as communities of practices actively manage knowledge sometimes explicit such as body of knowledge repositories and sometimes tacit such as relationship building and cross boundary problem solving Do you have well used technology such as an expertise locator or searchable personnel websites to support learning and access to experts Do you include outside experts such as retirees stakeholders customers and researchers in your work on a regular basis to improve outcomes and learning Do you have policies in place guiding the sharing of knowledge in these communities e g intellectual property confidentiality and privacy considerations Further guidance and practical examples Practice Guide 3 Networks and Communities Practice Guide 4 Communities of Practice Good

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/552/528 (2016-02-12)
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