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  • Publications: 2015 | Auditor General of British Columbia
    1991 Report of the Auditor General 1990 March 1990 Report of the Auditor General 1989 March 1989 Report of the Auditor General 1988 March 1988 Report of the Auditor General 1987 March 1987 Report of the Auditor General 1986 April 1986 Pages first previous 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 next last Find a publication Keywords Start date Year Year 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 End date Year Year 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 Subject Any Annual Reports Education Environment Natural Resources Finance Follow up Reports Forestry Governance Accountability Health Information Technology Justice Public Safety Knowledge Management Miscellaneous Procurement Social Services Transportation Quick Links What is a financial audit What is a performance audit Subscribe to alerts Notify me of new reports Notify

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/pubs/all?page=38 (2016-02-12)
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  • Overview
    as a federally chartered non profit membership organization CST drew participants from government industry and academia who sought to understand the implications of climate and energy shifts for the transportation sector and to prepare for such changes With start up funds from Environment Canada and Transport Canada CST provided leadership in pursuing sustainable transportation first by defining what the concept meant and envisioning what such a future would look like The CST proposed a definition of sustainable transportation in 1997 updated in 2000 to the following A sustainable transportation system is one that allows the basic access needs of individuals and societies to be met safely and in a manner consistent with human and ecosystem health and with equity within and between generations is affordable operates efficiently offers choice of transport mode and supports a vibrant economy limits emissions and waste within the planetâ s ability to absorb them minimizes consumption of non renewable resources limits consumption of renewable resources to the sustainable yield level reuses and recycles its components and minimizes the use of land and the production of noise Canadaâ s leadership in defining sustainable transportation has been widely recognised beyond our borders and has been adapted for

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/815 (2016-02-12)
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  • Auditor General Comments
    later it is a good time to reflect upon what has been achieved what lies ahead and how expectations align with the current transit landscape In 2012 my Office released the results of our audit of BC Transitâ s ridership growth As part of this work we gathered valuable information from a variety of sources that for many reasons was not included in the report I felt it important to share this valuable information so I am pleased to release Shaping Transitâ s Future in British Columbia an interactive and informative web based resource As with some of our other informational resources e g January 2013â s Health Funding Explained which are not audits we produce such work where information may not be publicly available or available in a single and or easily accessible location I have also prepared a pdf summary of this report which is available here Because BC Transit has multiple stakeholders across the province and numerous overlapping but not always cohesive guiding documents we determined that this work would be valuable to legislators transit planners and British Columbians to understand the challenges involved in achieving sustainable public transit In addition to my Officeâ s 2012 audit

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/842 (2016-02-12)
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  • BC Transit's objectives
    following priorities Expanding ridership opportunities Support for economic growth First Nations reconciliation Climate action carbon neutrality and hydrogen fuel cell buses Transit funding strategies First Nations reconciliation Corporate Service Plan annual BC Transit board with provincial government Purpose Sets out plans and forecasts for three year period Establishes targets Encapsulates goals from BC Transitâ s strategic plan as well as Governmentâ s Letter of Expectations Official Community Plans ongoing Local governments regional districts Purpose Sets longer term vision for the community Statement of objectives and policies to guide decisions on planning and land use management All bylaws and works undertaken by a Council or Board must be consistent with the plan Address transportation as well as set targets policies and actions for the reduction of GHG emissions Local governments set their own targets they are expected to have at least one emissions reduction target Goals An Official Community Plan should work towards the purpose and goals referred to in section 849 regional growth strategy goals which include the following goals relevant to transit Avoid urban sprawl Minimize automobile use and encourage walking cycling and efficient public transit Move goods and people efficiently making effective use of transportation and utility corridors â Transit Future Plans 2009 onwards BC Transit with local governments  Purpose Transit future plans envision what a communityâ s transit network should look like in 25 years It describes and prioritizes infrastructure and investment needed to get there Analyzes the existing transit system to see how it could be improved Plans have been approved as of May 2013 for  Campbell River Cowichan Valley Kamloops Victoria Abbotsford and Mission Chilliwack Central Okanagan Planning underway as of May 2013 for Nanaimo North Okanagan Prince George Saltspring Sunshine Coast Indicates planning towards a Transit Future plan Other areas have a variety of public consultation processes regarding transit improvements  Transportation Plans Local governments voluntary Influence whether people walk cycle and take transit or drive their car â and associated emissions implications Many communities have developed comprehensive transportation plans integrated with their OCP E g City of Kelowna has developed a plan focused on managing transportation demand Institutional sustainability plans Post secondary institutions regional health authorities within BC Transit s service areas An example of sustainability plans that include a transit component is the University of Victoria s Sustainability Action Plan 2009 2014 It includes a goal to increase bus use cycling and carpooling to 70 percent of campus modal split by 2014 throguh better transit infrastructure Actions to achieve this goal include working with BC Transit and the CRD to enhance transit service that could include a Light Rapid Transit or equivalent  line to campus Source OAG based on information from BC Transit and Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure 2012 13 To consider  How should all of the various plans that relate to transit fit together There is general agreement among stakeholders that increasing transit ridership is an important goal along with reducing single occupant vehicle use There

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/818 (2016-02-12)
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  • Decision-making on transit policy
    The mixture of housing commercial and institutional land use Greater mix tends to reduce vehicle travel and increase use of alternative modes especially walking E g a neighbourhood with housing only results in more people using cars to get to shops and facilities compared with a neighbourhood where these shops and facilities exist together with housing Regional accessibility The location of development relative to a regional urban centre This reduces per capity vehicle mileage The further a resident or employee is from the centre the more they tend to drive Connections between walkways and roads The degree to which walkways and roads are connected Increased roadway connectivity can reduce vehicle travel and improved walkway connectivity increases non motorized travel Lack of connectivity in suburban streets cul de sac development typically designed to reduce through traffic makes these developments impossible to serve efficiently by public transit Parking supply and management Number of parking spaces per building unit or acre and how parking is managed and priced Putting an end to free parking  tends to reduce vehicle ownership and use and increase use of alternative modes Site design Oriented for auto or multi modal accessibility More multi modal site design can reduce automobile trips E g a building with a main entrance directly accessible from a sidewalk and or bus stop encourages walking or transit more than a building whose main entrance is accessible through a parking lot Text box G  Transit oriented development click to read Transit Oriented Development TOD refers to residential and commercial areas designed to maximize transit access and use Studies indicate that people who live and work in TODs tend to own fewer vehicles drive less and rely more on alternative modes of transportation than they would in more automobile dependent locations The concept of â location efficiencyâ looks at the combined household spending on housing and transportation With rising energy costs the higher land cost of living in a transit friendly neighbourhood can actually make for a more affordable cost of living by reducing the cost of transportation Not needing a second vehicle or even a first vehicle can greatly increase the affordability of urban living even in moderately sized communities  To consider  How can transit and land use planning processes effectively be integrated Transportation Broader transportation policies such as the location and size of highways and bridges parking fees or road regulations also affect transitâ s financial and environmental success Transit services often cross jurisdictional boundaries and therefore require collaboration between different jurisdictions and levels of government to run smoothly and consistently For example the proposed rapid transit project for Victoria would run through five municipalities and on a highway that is under provincial jurisdiction To consider How are transit goals integrated into the overall vision for the overall vision for transportation in B C Economic Government economic policies and other decisions beyond the transportation arena can also influence the success and financial viability of transit servicesâ for example tax policies

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/819 (2016-02-12)
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  • Multiple stakeholders | Auditor General of British Columbia
    and the 130 local governments outside of metro Vancouver that host transit services The division of roles and responsibilities is complex Lead roles for stakeholders vary from one decision making area to the next Figure 5 Transit roles and responsibilities click image to enlarge Numerous other agencies also have a role to play in transit development funding and or operations federal government transit operating companies other provincial ministries major employers post secondary institutions and hospitals concentrated populations of transit users airport authorities BC Ferries Transit customers needs and preferences also influence transit decision making and BC Transit solicits input from the public into transit planning To consider Does the current governance model allow for the most efficient and effective allocation of roles and responsibilities to meet the long term sustainable transportation goals Shaping the Future Policy and Governance up BC Transit s objectives Printer friendly version Shaping Transit s Future in British Columbia Auditor General Comments Response from BC Transit and Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure Introduction Shaping the Future Policy and Governance Multiple stakeholders BC Transit s objectives Decision making on transit policy Organizational structure Policy and Governance Questions for key stakeholders to consider Shaping the Future Funding Shaping

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/online/pubs/812/817 (2016-02-12)
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  • Organizational structure
    significant change in organizational structure knowledge and approach for the main stakeholders involved In British Columbia the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure created a Transit Branch subsequent to the launch of the Provincial Transit Plan to focus on this aspect

    Original URL path: http://www.bcauditor.com/book/export/html/820 (2016-02-12)
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