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  • Missa Puisque je vis & other works | The Binchois Consort
    almus Though known from Petrucci s 1504 collection Motetti C Concede nobis Domine the one non Marian work on this recording is clearly expressive of an earlier aesthetic It was probably composed in the 1470s or 80s around the same time as Salve maris stella which is found uniquely in the Verona manuscript 755 a source copied in the 1480s Whoever composed these striking works they are linked at least to contemporary ears by a sense of drive and formal coherence rare before Josquin Rather like the contemporary Venetian artistic strain dubbed by Berenson the Giorgionesque these motets seem at the very least to be linked by emulation of the style of one of the fifteenth century s great originals Both are presented here for the first time Concede nobis Domine with new words for its textless second half composed by Leofranc Holford Strevens The same transition from general veneration to specific plea for intercession that shaped the text of Omnium bonorum plena and so many other Marian motets also characterizes Salve maris stella The cryptic words of this motet pray for Mary s mediation on behalf of a true hero named as Charolus in the tenor and bass and Henricus in the top part whose plea to judge from references in the text has some association with the sea and safe maritime travel While the motet may have originated as a prayer for safe passage on a pilgrimage Rob Wegman has suggested to me a more specific possible scenario in the person of Henry Tudor the future Henry VII of England and the occasion of his invasion of England in 1485 Since Henry had been living in Brittany for some years his assault on his intended kingdom involved the crossing of the English Channel the putative source of the seafaring motifs in the text of the motet His ultimately successful venture ending in the death of Richard III on Bosworth Field was preceded by an abortive one two years previously when stormy seas had thwarted his attack as recounted by the contemporary chronicler Polydore Vergil I thank Professor Wegman for this material I have modernized the English Henry had prepared an army of 5 000 Bretons and furnished a navy of 15 ships which began to sail with prosperous wind the 6th ides of October in the year of health 1483 but a little before a sudden tempest arose with which he was so afflicted that his ships were constrained by force of a cruel gale of wind to turn their course to one way and another some of them were blown back into Normandy others into Brittany The ship in which Henry was with one other tossed all the night long with the waves came at the last very early in the morning when the wind grew calm upon the south coast of England from here Earl Henry viewing afar off all the shore beset with soldiers which King Richard had everywhere placed gave open commandment that not

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  • Busnois: Missa L’homme armé; Domarto: Missa Spiritus almus; Pullois: Flos de spina | The Binchois Consort
    measure from its performers But there is much more here than just gymnastics Busnois has to modern sensibilities anyway an uncanny sense of timing with everything seeming to fall felicitously suavely sculpted components building into a masterly overall design Thus points of repose are just as absorbing as points of tension the brilliant pacing and manipulation of rhythm pitch and counterpoint seeming to draw the listener irresistibly onward Everything seems calculated to entice the ear into Busnois s often subtle and nuanced soundworld and to listen intently to the gracefully arching and gently climaxing melodic lines in such reduced voice passages as the Christe section of the Kyrie is to receive an impression of real feeling and sincerity of utterance The same almost mesmerizing brilliance is so striking in the Marian motet Gaude celestis domina that even had it not been identified by Rob Wegman from a quotation in Tinctoris hearers familiar with Busnois s other works would have immediately suspected his hand here also The driving and often highly syncopated rhythms energetic passages in tenths and thrilling metrical and rhythmic shifts of gear immediately call to mind the similar idiom of In hydraulis and Incomprehensibilia firme the latter recorded by the Binchois Consort on A Marriage of England and Burgundy CDA67129 Compared to the Mass and Gaude celestis domina the Marian motet Anima mea liquefacta est comes as a stylistic surprise Though exhibiting similarly long pliable melodic lines and concluding with a driving syncopated passage that relates its style to parts of Busnois s other works on this disc this piece presents its composer in a rather different and much more introspective light Its darker sonorities combination of low voices polytextuality its tenor sings the text of the scaffold chant the Marian responsory Stirps Jesse and Song of Songs text relate the piece as Paula Higgins has shown to an early fifteenth century repertoire and a number of scholars have suggested that it may occupy an early position in its composer s output Its sombre tone gives Anima mea a lamenting plangent quality and has led Higgins to hypothesize that the piece may have been associated with a royal death Whatever occasioned its composition though this is a deeply felt and moving work and unusual though it is in the context of Busnois s other works it is similarly expressive of an emotional temperament Even such an individual voice as that of Busnois did not emerge from nowhere however one of his more signal influences as outlined in an article by Rob Wegman which described it fully for the first time was the other Mass on this disc the Missa Spiritus almus by Petrus de Domarto Hardly a household name today Domarto as again attested by Tinctoris was a figure of considerable repute in the mid late fifteenth century His approach to metre and particularly cantus firmus layout may have instigated a trend which also embraced one and perhaps two Masses by his apparently younger contemporary the Missa O

    Original URL path: http://www.binchoisconsort.com/product/busnois-missa-lhomme-arme-domarto-missa-spiritus-almus-pullois-flos-de-spina/?add_to_wishlist=3176 (2016-02-13)
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  • Busnois: Missa L’homme armé; Domarto: Missa Spiritus almus; Pullois: Flos de spina | The Binchois Consort
    measure from its performers But there is much more here than just gymnastics Busnois has to modern sensibilities anyway an uncanny sense of timing with everything seeming to fall felicitously suavely sculpted components building into a masterly overall design Thus points of repose are just as absorbing as points of tension the brilliant pacing and manipulation of rhythm pitch and counterpoint seeming to draw the listener irresistibly onward Everything seems calculated to entice the ear into Busnois s often subtle and nuanced soundworld and to listen intently to the gracefully arching and gently climaxing melodic lines in such reduced voice passages as the Christe section of the Kyrie is to receive an impression of real feeling and sincerity of utterance The same almost mesmerizing brilliance is so striking in the Marian motet Gaude celestis domina that even had it not been identified by Rob Wegman from a quotation in Tinctoris hearers familiar with Busnois s other works would have immediately suspected his hand here also The driving and often highly syncopated rhythms energetic passages in tenths and thrilling metrical and rhythmic shifts of gear immediately call to mind the similar idiom of In hydraulis and Incomprehensibilia firme the latter recorded by the Binchois Consort on A Marriage of England and Burgundy CDA67129 Compared to the Mass and Gaude celestis domina the Marian motet Anima mea liquefacta est comes as a stylistic surprise Though exhibiting similarly long pliable melodic lines and concluding with a driving syncopated passage that relates its style to parts of Busnois s other works on this disc this piece presents its composer in a rather different and much more introspective light Its darker sonorities combination of low voices polytextuality its tenor sings the text of the scaffold chant the Marian responsory Stirps Jesse and Song of Songs text relate the piece as Paula Higgins has shown to an early fifteenth century repertoire and a number of scholars have suggested that it may occupy an early position in its composer s output Its sombre tone gives Anima mea a lamenting plangent quality and has led Higgins to hypothesize that the piece may have been associated with a royal death Whatever occasioned its composition though this is a deeply felt and moving work and unusual though it is in the context of Busnois s other works it is similarly expressive of an emotional temperament Even such an individual voice as that of Busnois did not emerge from nowhere however one of his more signal influences as outlined in an article by Rob Wegman which described it fully for the first time was the other Mass on this disc the Missa Spiritus almus by Petrus de Domarto Hardly a household name today Domarto as again attested by Tinctoris was a figure of considerable repute in the mid late fifteenth century His approach to metre and particularly cantus firmus layout may have instigated a trend which also embraced one and perhaps two Masses by his apparently younger contemporary the Missa O

    Original URL path: http://www.binchoisconsort.com/product/busnois-missa-lhomme-arme-domarto-missa-spiritus-almus-pullois-flos-de-spina/?add_to_wishlist=3112 (2016-02-13)
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  • Busnois: Missa L’homme armé; Domarto: Missa Spiritus almus; Pullois: Flos de spina | The Binchois Consort
    measure from its performers But there is much more here than just gymnastics Busnois has to modern sensibilities anyway an uncanny sense of timing with everything seeming to fall felicitously suavely sculpted components building into a masterly overall design Thus points of repose are just as absorbing as points of tension the brilliant pacing and manipulation of rhythm pitch and counterpoint seeming to draw the listener irresistibly onward Everything seems calculated to entice the ear into Busnois s often subtle and nuanced soundworld and to listen intently to the gracefully arching and gently climaxing melodic lines in such reduced voice passages as the Christe section of the Kyrie is to receive an impression of real feeling and sincerity of utterance The same almost mesmerizing brilliance is so striking in the Marian motet Gaude celestis domina that even had it not been identified by Rob Wegman from a quotation in Tinctoris hearers familiar with Busnois s other works would have immediately suspected his hand here also The driving and often highly syncopated rhythms energetic passages in tenths and thrilling metrical and rhythmic shifts of gear immediately call to mind the similar idiom of In hydraulis and Incomprehensibilia firme the latter recorded by the Binchois Consort on A Marriage of England and Burgundy CDA67129 Compared to the Mass and Gaude celestis domina the Marian motet Anima mea liquefacta est comes as a stylistic surprise Though exhibiting similarly long pliable melodic lines and concluding with a driving syncopated passage that relates its style to parts of Busnois s other works on this disc this piece presents its composer in a rather different and much more introspective light Its darker sonorities combination of low voices polytextuality its tenor sings the text of the scaffold chant the Marian responsory Stirps Jesse and Song of Songs text relate the piece as Paula Higgins has shown to an early fifteenth century repertoire and a number of scholars have suggested that it may occupy an early position in its composer s output Its sombre tone gives Anima mea a lamenting plangent quality and has led Higgins to hypothesize that the piece may have been associated with a royal death Whatever occasioned its composition though this is a deeply felt and moving work and unusual though it is in the context of Busnois s other works it is similarly expressive of an emotional temperament Even such an individual voice as that of Busnois did not emerge from nowhere however one of his more signal influences as outlined in an article by Rob Wegman which described it fully for the first time was the other Mass on this disc the Missa Spiritus almus by Petrus de Domarto Hardly a household name today Domarto as again attested by Tinctoris was a figure of considerable repute in the mid late fifteenth century His approach to metre and particularly cantus firmus layout may have instigated a trend which also embraced one and perhaps two Masses by his apparently younger contemporary the Missa O

    Original URL path: http://www.binchoisconsort.com/product/busnois-missa-lhomme-arme-domarto-missa-spiritus-almus-pullois-flos-de-spina/?add_to_wishlist=3174 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Busnois: Missa L’homme armé; Domarto: Missa Spiritus almus; Pullois: Flos de spina | The Binchois Consort
    measure from its performers But there is much more here than just gymnastics Busnois has to modern sensibilities anyway an uncanny sense of timing with everything seeming to fall felicitously suavely sculpted components building into a masterly overall design Thus points of repose are just as absorbing as points of tension the brilliant pacing and manipulation of rhythm pitch and counterpoint seeming to draw the listener irresistibly onward Everything seems calculated to entice the ear into Busnois s often subtle and nuanced soundworld and to listen intently to the gracefully arching and gently climaxing melodic lines in such reduced voice passages as the Christe section of the Kyrie is to receive an impression of real feeling and sincerity of utterance The same almost mesmerizing brilliance is so striking in the Marian motet Gaude celestis domina that even had it not been identified by Rob Wegman from a quotation in Tinctoris hearers familiar with Busnois s other works would have immediately suspected his hand here also The driving and often highly syncopated rhythms energetic passages in tenths and thrilling metrical and rhythmic shifts of gear immediately call to mind the similar idiom of In hydraulis and Incomprehensibilia firme the latter recorded by the Binchois Consort on A Marriage of England and Burgundy CDA67129 Compared to the Mass and Gaude celestis domina the Marian motet Anima mea liquefacta est comes as a stylistic surprise Though exhibiting similarly long pliable melodic lines and concluding with a driving syncopated passage that relates its style to parts of Busnois s other works on this disc this piece presents its composer in a rather different and much more introspective light Its darker sonorities combination of low voices polytextuality its tenor sings the text of the scaffold chant the Marian responsory Stirps Jesse and Song of Songs text relate the piece as Paula Higgins has shown to an early fifteenth century repertoire and a number of scholars have suggested that it may occupy an early position in its composer s output Its sombre tone gives Anima mea a lamenting plangent quality and has led Higgins to hypothesize that the piece may have been associated with a royal death Whatever occasioned its composition though this is a deeply felt and moving work and unusual though it is in the context of Busnois s other works it is similarly expressive of an emotional temperament Even such an individual voice as that of Busnois did not emerge from nowhere however one of his more signal influences as outlined in an article by Rob Wegman which described it fully for the first time was the other Mass on this disc the Missa Spiritus almus by Petrus de Domarto Hardly a household name today Domarto as again attested by Tinctoris was a figure of considerable repute in the mid late fifteenth century His approach to metre and particularly cantus firmus layout may have instigated a trend which also embraced one and perhaps two Masses by his apparently younger contemporary the Missa O

    Original URL path: http://www.binchoisconsort.com/product/busnois-missa-lhomme-arme-domarto-missa-spiritus-almus-pullois-flos-de-spina/?add_to_wishlist=3172 (2016-02-13)
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  • Josquin and his contemporaries | The Binchois Consort
    the modern style of composition particularly in his Tota pulchra es Now Nicolaes Craen a man in truth of outstanding natural qualities has seemed to me in his motet Tota pulchra es to have very successfully ignored the practices of the old musicians and we shall be able to learn from this how laudably he has moved beyond even the ancient laws For Luscinius Craen s ability lay in his method and skill in composing harmonies providing a model to be followed by all aspiring composers of his day Its great beauty notwithstanding the chief claim to fame of Verbum bonum et suave lies in confusion over its authorship a confusion offering clear proof that the cachet of Josquin s name was as great in some quarters in the sixteenth century as it is today Writing in 1558 the theorist Zarlino famously related I remember what I have heard the most excellent Adrian Willaert tell many times namely that they used to sing that six part motet Verbum bonum et suave under the name of Josquin at the Papal chapel in Rome on nearly every feastday of Our Lady It was ranked among the most excellent compositions that were sung in those days Now Willaert had moved to Italy from Flanders during the pontificate of Leo X 1513 21 and finding himself in the place where they sang that motet he noticed that it was ascribed to Josquin When he pointed out that it was in fact his own as it indeed was such was their malice or rather to put it more generously their ignorance that they never wanted to sing it again Veni sancte spiritus was universally accepted as a work by Josquin until 1985 when an attribution to his lesser known contemporary Forestier was noticed in a manuscript considered to be of greater authority Its credentials before that time seemed impeccable ascribed to Josquin it was showcased as the first piece in Ott s collection of motets Novum et insigne opus musicum published in 1537 8 and with its brilliant construction around two canons at the fifth seemed every inch the expression of the better known composer s legendary contrapuntal brilliance Whether by Josquin or not Veni sancte spiritus is an extraordinary musical achievement worthy to stand beside anything of its day further as one of the central pieces of the Josquin canon recognised in the sixteenth century it is an integral part of the picture of Josquin on which the modern view of the composer is based The four voice De profundis has conflicting attributions to Josquin and Champion presumably one of the brothers Jacques and Nicolas Champion who were employed in the Hapsburg Imperial Chapel in the first third of the sixteenth century For Glarean though there were no doubts either about the authorship of this piece or its quality for him it was the quintessence of Josquin in both its beauty of expression and its novelty Here indeed I should like everyone to observe

    Original URL path: http://www.binchoisconsort.com/product/josquin-and-his-contemporaries/?add_to_wishlist=3178 (2016-02-13)
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  • Josquin and his contemporaries | The Binchois Consort
    the modern style of composition particularly in his Tota pulchra es Now Nicolaes Craen a man in truth of outstanding natural qualities has seemed to me in his motet Tota pulchra es to have very successfully ignored the practices of the old musicians and we shall be able to learn from this how laudably he has moved beyond even the ancient laws For Luscinius Craen s ability lay in his method and skill in composing harmonies providing a model to be followed by all aspiring composers of his day Its great beauty notwithstanding the chief claim to fame of Verbum bonum et suave lies in confusion over its authorship a confusion offering clear proof that the cachet of Josquin s name was as great in some quarters in the sixteenth century as it is today Writing in 1558 the theorist Zarlino famously related I remember what I have heard the most excellent Adrian Willaert tell many times namely that they used to sing that six part motet Verbum bonum et suave under the name of Josquin at the Papal chapel in Rome on nearly every feastday of Our Lady It was ranked among the most excellent compositions that were sung in those days Now Willaert had moved to Italy from Flanders during the pontificate of Leo X 1513 21 and finding himself in the place where they sang that motet he noticed that it was ascribed to Josquin When he pointed out that it was in fact his own as it indeed was such was their malice or rather to put it more generously their ignorance that they never wanted to sing it again Veni sancte spiritus was universally accepted as a work by Josquin until 1985 when an attribution to his lesser known contemporary Forestier was noticed in a manuscript considered to be of greater authority Its credentials before that time seemed impeccable ascribed to Josquin it was showcased as the first piece in Ott s collection of motets Novum et insigne opus musicum published in 1537 8 and with its brilliant construction around two canons at the fifth seemed every inch the expression of the better known composer s legendary contrapuntal brilliance Whether by Josquin or not Veni sancte spiritus is an extraordinary musical achievement worthy to stand beside anything of its day further as one of the central pieces of the Josquin canon recognised in the sixteenth century it is an integral part of the picture of Josquin on which the modern view of the composer is based The four voice De profundis has conflicting attributions to Josquin and Champion presumably one of the brothers Jacques and Nicolas Champion who were employed in the Hapsburg Imperial Chapel in the first third of the sixteenth century For Glarean though there were no doubts either about the authorship of this piece or its quality for him it was the quintessence of Josquin in both its beauty of expression and its novelty Here indeed I should like everyone to observe

    Original URL path: http://www.binchoisconsort.com/product/josquin-and-his-contemporaries/?add_to_wishlist=3112 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Josquin and his contemporaries | The Binchois Consort
    the modern style of composition particularly in his Tota pulchra es Now Nicolaes Craen a man in truth of outstanding natural qualities has seemed to me in his motet Tota pulchra es to have very successfully ignored the practices of the old musicians and we shall be able to learn from this how laudably he has moved beyond even the ancient laws For Luscinius Craen s ability lay in his method and skill in composing harmonies providing a model to be followed by all aspiring composers of his day Its great beauty notwithstanding the chief claim to fame of Verbum bonum et suave lies in confusion over its authorship a confusion offering clear proof that the cachet of Josquin s name was as great in some quarters in the sixteenth century as it is today Writing in 1558 the theorist Zarlino famously related I remember what I have heard the most excellent Adrian Willaert tell many times namely that they used to sing that six part motet Verbum bonum et suave under the name of Josquin at the Papal chapel in Rome on nearly every feastday of Our Lady It was ranked among the most excellent compositions that were sung in those days Now Willaert had moved to Italy from Flanders during the pontificate of Leo X 1513 21 and finding himself in the place where they sang that motet he noticed that it was ascribed to Josquin When he pointed out that it was in fact his own as it indeed was such was their malice or rather to put it more generously their ignorance that they never wanted to sing it again Veni sancte spiritus was universally accepted as a work by Josquin until 1985 when an attribution to his lesser known contemporary Forestier was noticed in a manuscript considered to be of greater authority Its credentials before that time seemed impeccable ascribed to Josquin it was showcased as the first piece in Ott s collection of motets Novum et insigne opus musicum published in 1537 8 and with its brilliant construction around two canons at the fifth seemed every inch the expression of the better known composer s legendary contrapuntal brilliance Whether by Josquin or not Veni sancte spiritus is an extraordinary musical achievement worthy to stand beside anything of its day further as one of the central pieces of the Josquin canon recognised in the sixteenth century it is an integral part of the picture of Josquin on which the modern view of the composer is based The four voice De profundis has conflicting attributions to Josquin and Champion presumably one of the brothers Jacques and Nicolas Champion who were employed in the Hapsburg Imperial Chapel in the first third of the sixteenth century For Glarean though there were no doubts either about the authorship of this piece or its quality for him it was the quintessence of Josquin in both its beauty of expression and its novelty Here indeed I should like everyone to observe

    Original URL path: http://www.binchoisconsort.com/product/josquin-and-his-contemporaries/?add_to_wishlist=3174 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive



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