archive-com.com » COM » B » BPHOPE.COM

Total: 1350

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • What? I Can Fire My Psychiatrist? | bpHope - bp Magazine Community
    week I can see how this post could lead to a lot of health care bashing and that s NOT my intention There is far more good than bad in this world Please share your stories and advice on how we can all get the best psychiatric health care possible PEOPLE WITH BIPOLAR DISORDER DESERVE EXCELLENT HEALTH CARE PS I d like to do a shout out for my health care team My last psychiatrist Dr Steven Juergens who managed to look me in the eye every time and make me feel heard and respected my therapist Robin Laws who changes my life each time I see her my osteopath and mentor Dr John Takacs who is helping me get my body aligned with my mind my holistic and compassionate nurse practitioner and medications prescriber Julie Foster my mentor stunning thinker and coauthor Dr Jay Carter and most of all the person who has saved my life on numerous occasions my friend teacher and coauthor Dr John Preston Tagged with bipolar blog doctor bipolar disorder psychiatrist bipolar disorder About the author Julie A Fast Has 189 Articles Julie A Fast is the bestselling author of Loving Someone with Bipolar Take Charge of Bipolar Disorder and Get it Done When You re Depressed She is an award winning columnist for bp Magazine Fast Talk and has one of the top bipolar disorder blogs on the internet Julie is the bipolar disorder management specialist on the Oprah and Dr Oz website www ShareCare com She was the original consultant for Claire Danes on Homeland Julie is not only a leading expert on helping those affected by bipolar disorder and depression she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in 1995 and successfully as best she can manages the illness with medications and the strategies in her books Julie knows firsthand about living with and loving someone with bipolar disorder within her own life and helps family members partners and health care professionals understand and support those with the illness Julie is a highly in demand family and partner coach speaker and educator who is passionate about changing the way the world views and manages mood disorders 19 COMMENTS Terri February 19 2015 Reply I am going through this right now I did make a complaint to the head of the practice and demanded better treatment but he just told me either I communicate with my doctor or go to a different practice He changed my bipolar meds that I had been taking for more than 10 years right during the holidays I was so messed up with withdrawal that I got into a terrible accident and totaled my car and got pretty hurt Instead of explaining to me what the possible side effects of withdrawal would be and how long it would last he drug tested me and since I was taking pain medication he took me off my Xanex which I had also been taking for 10 years all at once throwing me into another withdrawal both within three weeks of each other I haven t slept in three weeks I sweat profusely during the night and get up at 3 00am and take cold showers to try to cool off I have now gone into a deep depression and can barely concentrate on anything I m praying to make it through each minute of my day Thank you for telling me it is OK to question your doctor or if you have a backup that you fire them This doctor is like a robot I just hope I don t die from it jennifer June 25 2015 Reply Depends on your insurance I paid for my own psychiatrist plural for over 30 years last payment was 190 and 10 to park Louise July 30 2015 Reply It took me 25 years to find the right psychiatrist I pay 165 for 20 minutes out of my own pocket I find that the better doctors don t take insurance She put together a cocktail of meds that have kept me stable for the past ten years and I am forever grateful Before her I had a succession of clowns When our lives are on the line we must advocate for ourselves and accept nothing less than the best possible care Julie Fast February 19 2015 Reply Wow Terri I m so proud of you for what you have already done to stick up for yourself What you are experiencing is so common I know you are depressed now and this makes it harder to advocate for yourself but it s essential you remember that you re depressed because your bipolar was triggered You will get out of this Here s what I suggest 1 Ask for help You can t do what you need to do on your own when the depression is raging Someone can help you do the next steps 2 Look for a new doctor starting today I don t care what it takes you have to get out of your current situation Just think In a few months you could be with a good health care team and feel so much better 3 Make an appointment with the current doctor and go in with a bulleted list of symptoms and with as much confidence and authority you can muster ask for what you need Get a note from the person who prescribed the pain meds or have them call The bulleted list covers the facts 10 years on meds that worked vs What is happening now List your current symptoms and explain the Xanax withdrawal symptoms especially The list isn t personal or passionate it s facts only as that is all a robot will understand Then list your three health care goals and what you need to reach the goals You can hand a copy of this one page list to your doctor and go over each item Even if this doesn t change the situation you will be on record asking for what you need Taking this action will be hard but it has to be done because you matter and I d like to see you stay alive My book Get it Done When You re Depressed has specific tips for taking action while depressed Now that you know you re not alone you can ask for help and take charge of your health care You can do it Julie Andrea February 19 2015 Reply I fired a bad psychiatrist after 16 years I believe that decision literally saved my life I was dying a slow death I was overmedicated and coming down with more and more bad side effects and health problems Now my medication is appropriate I don t have any noticeable side effects and I m regaining my physical health I should have fired that psychiatrist a long time ago julieafast 2 February 19 2015 Reply Report user Hello Andrea I believe your comments will help others do the same We can take charge or our health care Thank you Julie julie g br February 19 2015 Reply If it s not a good fit it s not a good fit It took me 2 tries but I ve found one who actually listens to me I m no longer on Latuda and Zoloft but am on a maintenance dosage of Lamactil Feel free to email me if you d like to Best of luck cptpb February 19 2015 Reply I think you ve hit on a couple of issues here One access to good health care mental and physical requires resources Unless you have money or excellent health insurance you are going to have a hard time finding high quality care I have been incredibly blessed to have great insurance and access to wonderful pdocs who have helped me manage since my diagnosis How do we help people with fewer resources Doctors who provide care to the disadvantaged are overwhelmed by the demand and there doesn t seem to be enough money to go around It is a big problem without an easy solution Secondly I think the fact that so many mentally ill people suffer alone adds to the issues they have to deal with I have been saddened by the number of people I met in the hospital and have met since my diagnosis that are dealing with their mental illness all alone or with a small group of other people also dealing with mental illness I know that without my wife parents in laws and friends around me providing support I would have committed suicide by now Social isolation means that not only do the mentally ill feel alone they have no champion to stand up for them when they can t stand for themselves I do tend to cut the mental health professionals a bit of slack because they have an extremely difficult job are often overworked and are only human beings Gross negligence dismissive attitudes over prescribing these are mostly symptoms of a system that as you say is badly broken and in many cases even non existent julieafast 2 February 19 2015 Reply Report user Great comments It is definitely more challenging if you are not in the private insurance world but I believe that once we ALL demand better health care the public sector will have to change as well Our voices matter Also you re correct that it s hard for us to take charge of our own health care when we are ill this is why having an advocate helps I believe that even when we are ill we can speak up and get what we want It will be scary and painful to do so but it s an investment in our futures we have to take Thanks for your insightful comment Julie Susan February 19 2015 Reply I fired my psychiatrist and now have mixed feelings about it I had good reason to he never listened to me was verbally abusive and two final straws for me was when I was in emotional pain I started crying and he told me I had to stop because he didn t have enough kleenex in his office even though there were two boxes sitting in front of me I found that very insensitive as well he refused to prescribe me any kind of medication to help with my anxiety and I found it unbearable at times Another doctor prescribed twelve lorazepams and I went through them in a 6 month period it wasn t like I was an addict To make a long story short I am now under the care of my physician however the meds that he had me on leave me very down and my physician does not feel comfortable messing with them and I don t blame her but at least she prescribed me some pams So now I find myself lost without a psychiatrist to help me adjust my medications It is very hard in Ontario to get good health care when it s free to all So I sit in my melancholy and pray that I will be assigned a psychiatrist soon and that they will be better than my last although I must admit it does make me gun shy It is a very perplexing position to be in Mary February 19 2015 Reply I had to fire a psychiatrist a few years back He would listen to no one not even my Psych Nurse who was my coordinator for my care through the Mental Health System here I ended up going outside the system into another hospital to seek a second opinion on my medications He agreed I was over medicated and took me on as a new patient I have been with him ever since I promptly told the first one I would no longer see him as he had no interest in what was best for me It was a liberating feeling to know I had control over my care not the other way around ssa1961 February 20 2015 Reply I think the availability of psych docs are on the in danger list If you have commerical insurance you have way more opitions Every physian I go to automatically treats and says I m a drug seeker I just want to sleep and get rid of the horrible anixity I m treated as oh well that s the way it is After working for a company for 31 years I was laid off I had a good psych doctor in which we were a team Once your on Medicaid your choices are very limited I need to go to interveiws with out shaking from the anixity Oh SSDI is the answer The problem is I m not disabled Debbi W February 20 2015 Reply Thank you for posting on the issue of taking control of whose your doctor When I had my onset I was given a psychiatrist by the hospital I went to He was horrible but I didn t know it Everyone involved appointment assistants etc said Oh he s a great doctor in the sweet voice This great doctor sat in his high up computer chair while he talked to me while I sat in the old fashioned chair with no legs When he did sit in his normal chair of course it had legs higher than the stubs on mine I felt condescended on like he was in complete control He never described anything he was doing to me He simply told me to do it I gained 30 lbs on depakote which was already an outdated drug I was distressed highly by the increase in weight Not once did he tell me that was most likely the reason When I switched to Lamictal with a different doctor I lost all the weight At one point he called me a Success and told me he didn t need to see me for a YEAR I had a DEEP depression for two years as well as a type of paranoia where I didn t feel paranoia but my actions were those of someone who did and I couldn t control manage them I was fairly fine for a year and went into a second two year depression again I was afraid to ask anyone for references on psychiatrists I did not know how to compare them even if I knew of one to compare it too I moved to a different city and had no choice in finding a new doctor My first requirement in finding a doctor was finding one that combined therapy and psychiatry My second requirement was that I be a part of the decision making process while understanding how the drugs will affect me and the repurcussions of taking them and assessing how they affected me once I started taking them I told the sister I moved next to to help me find a reference from someone reliable and I didn t care who found out I was looking for one She had a friend who was a drug rep for some kind of mental related medication I don t know the type She gave me her top three choices The one who was taking patients I have had for ten years I have had high anxieties lately that I have to a degree without my sales job but are through the roof in regards to sales We re currently working on that but I have not knock on wood and please God keep me safe and healthy I have not had a depression recurrence that is deep for all the years I have been with him I do get the winter syndrome but we re working on that I have found help greatly in the HappyLight 20 minute process every morning at daylight It s not the same though He s Dr David Beltzman in Ann Arbor and so far he is AMAZING with medications He knows what s going on in my life so he doesn t make changes in my medications purely on the changes I tell him about my emotions which is what the first doctor Dr Teas in IL did He never said Did you ever think that is the way a normal person would act in reaction to that situation When applicable Dr B does It was very refreshing to see this article of yours Thank you very much I am moving to a new city and am holding on to Dr B for the moment but one day he will retire What you wrote is reminder to stick up for myself and to hunt down that right doctor for me again I am SO frightened of changing doctors as it is my life for my mental health to be just that healthy I need a great doctor to help me make that happen lock February 26 2015 Reply I am glad finding your web site I really want to thank you for your time working on this good writing Will definitely enjoy the whole lot of the site and I have bookmarked it so to see the great stuff you re going to post janet June 25 2015 Reply I m very concerned about much issues and medication as well I haven t seen much psychiatrist in overnight a year Everytime l go in for my appontment it s a different thrropist and I m supposed to see a phsychiatrist and thier a nurse practitioner and different everytime I am currently in search of a phsyciatrist in my area but there is a waiting list sometimes 3months And then since I live alone I m concerned my Ins won t cover a new one I work a fulltime job and my medication has been modified so many times I ve had some diffaculty adjusting and I m affraid I could lose my job Thank you for this artical o see

    Original URL path: http://www.bphope.com/blog/what-i-can-fire-my-psychiatrist/ (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Ask the doctor: Feeling better about SAD | bpHope - bp Magazine Community
    at least in some people Question What treatments are available for bipolar that follows a seasonal pattern The best treatment for bipolar disorder involves a good relationship with a care provider who is familiar with your symptom pattern and able to recognize emerging problems and risk factors Any mood changes you may experience during the season are important data for your provider so it is important that you stay in close communication with him or her during such times of change For depressive symptoms in the fall your provider may suggest the use of a light box and regular exercise in addition to the medical and psychological management of bipolar disorder Spring mania can be very tricky When is an upswing in mood an emerging manic episode as opposed to normal joy and delight at the return of warm sunny days The critical problem with mania is that as your mood begins to escalate your self perception and insight begin to dissipate You can very rapidly become convinced that you are just fine and that your actions actions that others may consider to be indiscreet or risky are perfectly reasonable It is helpful to enlist a family member or friend to provide ongoing feedback on your health and stability Ask them to be honest and direct with you if they note any worrisome changes in your mood or behavior that might be suggestive of mania A manic episode can have profound personal social and vocational implications early intervention is crucial and life saving Whether your bipolar disorder is affected by the seasons or not the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle year round cannot be overstated Recognize your risks and work out a plan with your care provider to minimize them Author Melvin G McInnis MD Tagged with seasonal affective disorder winter depressiom About the author Melvin G McInnis Has 6 Articles Melvin G McInnis MD FRCPsych is Thomas B and Nancy Upjohn Woodworth Professor of Bipolar Disorder and Depression and professor of psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry University of Michigan School of Medicine He is also principal investigator of the Heinz C Prechter Bipolar Research Fund and associate director of the University of Michigan Depression Center LEAVE YOUR COMMENT Cancel reply Your email address will not be published Required fields are marked Message First Name or Nickname Do not use full name Email RELATED ARTICLES Bipolar Winter Blues December 10 2015 2 05 am Winter is quickly approaching and I m feeling more lethargic tired and irritable One thing I have noticed each winter living with bipolar disorder is that Are you SAD Step In To The Light November 7 2015 8 00 am It is that time of year already the time when Seasonal Affective Disorder folks like myself begin to plummet Actually it began in October When Getting the right treatment is HARD June 10 2015 8 00 am Here in Australia we are in Winter And as you all know along comes the seasonal emotional

    Original URL path: http://www.bphope.com/ask-the-doctor-feeling-better-about-sad/ (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Ask the doctor: Is it ADHD or bipolar—or both? | bpHope - bp Magazine Community
    Professor of Bipolar Disorder and Depression and professor of psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry University of Michigan School of Medicine He is also principal investigator of the Heinz C Prechter Bipolar Research Fund and associate director of the University of Michigan Depression Center 7 COMMENTS Aloha Universal March 7 2015 Reply Very helpful to consider as I initially thought I had ADD but was never diagnosed nor treated for it Once I was diagnosed with BP1 2001 age 44 the idea of also having ADD was completely ignored by my docs psychologist psychiatrist Every so often I ask What has happened is primary focus on the BP1 to stabilize It had confounded me as I knew I have always had ADD symptoms despite prior undiagnosed BP2 as a child Perhaps once BP1 is stabilized then maybe they will see the ADD I cannot take meds chemically sensitive side effects worse no benefit from the meds And of course ADHD meds are stimulants can so easily trigger manic episodes Very happy to have this topic brought up Aloha Universal March 7 2015 Reply Has there been any research of BP ADHD PTSD OCD going on concurrently Aloha Universal March 7 2015 Reply P S the BP2 I refer to also was mixed with PTSD childhood trauma OCD All undiagnosed This is in hindsight as I was a former psychotherapist All the training experience finally helping me with my own MH issues These were exacerbated with a freeway accident with head injury OBE Became suddenly medically disabled by the now BP1 exacerbated PTSD OCD still undiagnosed ADD Physically also became disabled by Fibromyalgia A big pot of symptoms diagnoses to be sure So happy for the movement forward in research I left the field in September 2000 Tee October 12 2015 Reply I was diagnosed with bipolar in 2011 and then with ADD IN 2013 I take Prozac and Abilify for my bilpolar and Adderal for ADD it had help me out a great deal I actual can stay focused get things done around the house and stay out of bed I still have other issue that keep me from doing everything that I want to do but at least I m not in bed 24 7 anymore Shyla October 13 2015 Reply I always hear about how you must treat bipolar before ADHD but I ve had a different experience My first doc diagnosed me with bipolar The second one wasn t convinced I had bipolar and diagnosed me with ADHD I was prescribed Wellbutrin and Lamictal but since I had an allergic reaction to the Lamictal I ended up just taking Wellbutrin This had instant and amazing results All those ADHD symptoms went poof So we all thought that I did indeed have ADHD instead of bipolar But then hypomania hit just as usual and it was followed by depression and the cycle continued The interesting thing was that my mood episodes which cycle rather rapidly are so much

    Original URL path: http://www.bphope.com/ask-the-doctor-is-it-adhd-or-bipolar-or-both/ (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • SoundOFF! Thoughts on ECT | bpHope - bp Magazine Community
    night without needing medicine This treatment saved my life and only took 20 minutes for 10 days I have been on antidepressants for the last 14 years I have never felt the way I have since this treatment There is hope For those who need it rTMS is a wonderful alternative to ECT L D Gainesville FL Two years ago I received 12 bilateral ECT treatments in our local hospital Informed consent is not at all what it should be What I have had to adjust to adapt to and manage with since then and the damage done to me are not at all what I consented to nor was informed of I never had considered ECT I can only figure I was desperate and urge everyone who has not had it to research it now fully before you are put in such a vulnerable situation with no resources available The depressive side sucks the life out of us and we put our lives in the hands of those who tell us more about our meds than this procedure My own strength and determination have brought me a long way on my own since then although nowhere near how I was I worry greatly about those who cannot speak up or fear speaking up K L Oakville ON Over seven months in 1999 I received 21 sessions of primarily bilateral lobe ECT In March 2005 I went in for a series of primarily unilateral ECT treatments I had five unilateral and one bilateral over the course of two months I am a strong advocate of ECT because it took me out of deep dark depressions that medicine alone could not do Personally I had fewer cognitive side effects such as memory loss poor attention and executive functioning from the unilateral ECT as opposed to the bilateral ECT L W Bobo Pullman WA When I was five years old and in kindergarten I became ill No one knew what was wrong with me We had never heard of mental illness I ended up not being diagnosed with schizoaffective bipolar disorder until my teen years I did not receive proper medications until 1999 As a result of the effect my early illness had on my development my illness is quite severe and disabling When I was 16 years old I fell into a very deep psychosis thinking I had died and gone to hell I had been hospitalized for nearly three months when my doctor suggested ECT to my parents We ended up in court to get approval for ECT After only a few treatments I began to slowly pull out of my psychosis Within a month I was out of the hospital and beginning a long process of recovering from the devastating event Without ECT I don t know where I would be today I do think however that ECT should be a last resort due to the chunks of memory that can be deleted from one s mind forever I not only had memory loss for the time around the ECT treatments but I also had chunks of my life I could not remember at all I do think ECT should be available as a treatment as it may be the only thing that works for someone L R E Prairie du Rocher IL I am a 60 year old woman who has rapid cycling mixed state bipolar I that was diagnosed 25 years ago In 1989 I had reached a state where all medications then available to treat bipolar were having little or no effect on me I was given a series of five sets of 12 bilateral ECT treatments followed by monthly booster treatments for the next six years The result I am today a healthy functioning and successful woman having worked for 40 years some very difficult others quite productive in important administrative positions In addition to maintaining my professional skill my life has become much happier much more satisfying emotionally psychologically and socially J T K Bella Vista AR I am a 47 year old woman who has bipolar II disorder In 2002 I experienced a severe depression with psychosis I was admitted to a forensic mental health hospital and treated with ECT For me ECT was a wonderful treatment that brought me back to life My treatment consisted of six sessions and by the fourth session I told the staff that I could be the poster child for ECT Yes I had some memory loss but whether this was the result of ECT or a reflection of my severe psychosis remains unclear Since then I have shared my experiences with ECT with several other women It is my hope that with education people will see beyond the horrible and often antiquated portrayals of ECT and consider it as a humane treatment that continues to have a role in treating severe depression E F Elgin IL From 1998 to 2000 I had more than 70 ECTs for the treatment of bipolar disorder At the time it was the only thing keeping me alive because all other medications had failed I had them every other day or three times a week for several months However the symptoms would come back after two or three days At the time of treatment I lost all short term and some long term memory like my wedding and the birth of my three children I was unable to do simple things like cook or go to and from the grocery store without getting lost I now take five medications just to function It has been five years and I don t see any positive effect on my illness or the severity of it due to ECTs L G Colorado Springs CO Tagged with Bipolar Treatment with ECT electroconvulsive therapy About the author BP Readers Has 34 Articles 10 COMMENTS kate July 1 2015 Reply I read positive reviews and just sit here feeling totally invalidated ECT did not work for me I had 7 rounds of bilateral ect and one month later nearly succeeded at taking my life I was on a respirator and in the ICU I still don t feel like I am myself It totally destroyed my creativity I can t add large sums anymore in my head I forget things so much when people talk about things that happened like I should know i don t It is the BARBARIC treatment of yesterday In fact don t be fooled it is worse they have to use more shock to overcome the muscle relaxers and anesthesia What made it worse on the body was the violent seizures They relax you But because of that they have to use more juice to overcome that I woke up with horrible headaches and vomiting according to my Mother who cared for me I don t remember a lot of it I just feel like I am not totally here Like I am disconnected from everyone I eventually cycled again into mania a few months later and am now trying to control that I am glad some of these people are still euphoric from the brain damage and feel it saved them But what i worry about is in 20 years what it does to people i can say from my side NEVER again I feel like a shell of myself I am glad I didn t succeed and sometimes I wish I did I am just glad God gave me another chance I was dead in that trauma unit They brought me back and I am here I try really hard not to feel hopeless because of the love I felt I just wish I was myself again and wonder when my intelligence will be normal again quibly July 4 2015 Reply Report user I was given ECT at a VA facility near a famous college in Michigan Honestly it likely did in fact save my life because I had been suffering for decades from some serious darkened abyss periods that were filled with self hate leading to dark thoughts about suicide again and again It took nearly 20 some odd years of asking when most providers looked at me as if I was asking them to poke me in the eye with a pen or something Do I still think about it now yes occasionally when I feel overwhelmed But the ECT for me took away the really dark times though it left me struggling at first because I wasn t prepared for how to react when my mind was unable to go that far down anymore How I was supposed to react when I expected my mind to just take over for me Mimi L July 28 2015 Reply I was diagnosed manic depressive 20 years ago My parents never accepted this to be a real condition as it would tarnish their parenting skills I suppose They are both dead and neither one ever believed I was sick Swimming upstream is an understatement considering they were both manic depressives and Dad was also an alcoholic It s a curse Especially after having ECT I went from a 6 figure income working 80 hrs a week to working 8 hr weeks earning 15 00 I have depression resistant to medicine taken everything imaginable for the illness and I still can t manage it And I married an undiagnosed bipolar man years ago shocker ECT has caused memory loss feeding the monster and a 40 year old to feel like they have dementia My mood swings are worse and it took me from zombie to really sad and depressed zombie It is an expensive disorder the meds the mania the scrapes with law etc Yet insurance is really shitty about helping us get enough talk therapy to get off SSDi and integrate into society I m tired of being blase bored tired and mean ECT made my condition worse I had 2 different sessions of 25 rounds A person on disability is supposed to pay a 15 000 anesthesia bill I don t think so My husband and I never had kids because it sucks to have this disorder and I refuse to bring a life into this world to be miserable and struggle if I can help it Am I glad I was born yes Am I glad I never had children yes Seems the only way to stop the madness Lisa August 4 2015 Reply I am a 53 year old with rapid cycling BPII Medications either did nothing to stop the cycling or had intolerable side effects i e Lithium Since I was planning to enter a rigorous health related college program at the end of the summer I discussed ECT with my doctor in the spring as a possible way to get the rapid cycling under control before I entered school I completed 6 unilateral treatments on an outpatient basis during a mild depressive phase I didn t notice much memory loss or uncomfortable side effects from these treatments but I didn t notice any improvements in mood either In fact I felt a little more depressed than when I started I spoke with my doctor again who recommended going to bilateral treatments on an inpatient basis which I reluctantly agreed to I spent a month in a psychiatric hospital receiving treatments three times a week Each one made me feel worse from a mood perspective and seemed to cause increasing cognitive memory impairment When I got to bilateral treatment 7 I was completely suicidal and would have acted without hesitation or remorse had I been outside the controlled hospital environment Still my doctor urged me to try to get at least 10 bilateral treatments done I submitted to the 8th but it was then I knew I had to stop because I actually formulated a plausible plan for how I could kill myself in the hospital despite all of the controls and precautions built into that environment I declared that I was done with ECT and went back on meds the next day I felt orders of magnitude better after that Even so I m still struggling with some depression and I m amazed at how difficult it is for me to concentrate get things done and learn new information Retrograde amnesia is also present and it causes great frustration and confusion because it largely affects everyday procedural information such as how to charge an iPhone or drive to the supermarket In summary I knew that ECT might not work and might cause some memory problems but the promotional video did not highlight the possibility that it might make depression about as bad as it can possibly get or destroy my ability to think and learn I start school in less than 2 weeks and have no idea how I ll get through it at this point I m glad other people have found peace and healing from ECT but it was probably the worse possible treatment for me personally Jen October 4 2015 Reply Lisa I just had 4 unilateral ect treatments am scheduled for more expecting 9 12 to be the magic number But like you I am feeling much worse after starting them I started with mild depression such but cope able Now after the 3rd 4th ECT I ve hit a deep depression I feel absolutely crazy I cry constantly in public or anywhere I enter 5 hours periods of crying so hard my head face swell I DONT KNOW WHAT TO THINK OR WHOSE OPINION IF ANYONE I SHOULD TRUST Like you I ve been going back to college now after just a few ECT treatments I feel like I ve lost half my intelligence functional abilities at even such things as making a simple meal for 2 weeks I ve gone to just eating sweets junk I m so scared My intelligence is all I had good God if that s what I just sacrificed it s not worth living Jenna December 8 2015 Reply I also received informed consent for treatment of major depressive disorder now over a year later I still cannot function I cannot learn new things I am unable to navigate my own neighborhood often get lost I have both long term short term memory loss This in it of itself is making my depression worse I am sad everyday that my suicide attempt wasn t successful I will be more diligent next time Katie September 13 2015 Reply I was hospitalized at the end of 2012 beginning of 2013 for severe depression and anxiety The doctor who did my intake in the hospital after reading some of my background and listening to me for what it was worth told me that she thought I might benefit from ECT I was only told that it supposedly had good results in helping with depression and by that time I had been suffering from incredibly severe depression for around four years at that point and I was desperate I wanted to get back to a normal life even if was even slightly more normal The doctor who was in charge of my treatment went over what I then thought was in depth detail what the procedure would be like the side effects etc Both my mom dad and I were really hesitant about the idea of doctors inducing a seizure in my brain I was terrified at the aspect and I could tell my parents were no better but it was like someone had thrown me a rope and the only options I had were to either grab it and move towards something terrifying and uncertain or drop the rope and surely drown I still remember all the details leading up to being brought into the room I can still remember and see it now sometimes when I close my eyes Know what I can t remember though Something I did literally 30 seconds ago even a couple months after treatment stopped which I cut off early due to memory impairments I could barely do any homework for school I would slave away for hours trying to read through 10 15 pages of a chapter because each time I would turn to the next page I could hardly remember what I had just read It was a continuous dance 1 page forward 1 page back reread the original page possibly go back to the previous page again and if I was lucky move on to the next page and then repeat the cycle What would have taken me maybe 30 minutes to read and annotate turned into an hour or more My sleep became worse because I d keep myself up late to compensate for my slower memory retention It s been 3 4 years since I had elective seizures and it did nothing to help Nothing at all It made things worse for me I came out of the hospital more depressed than when I went in because I could barely remember anything I felt like a little kid did I remember to take my medicine Did I shut the light off in my room I couldn t recall where I had set a pen down on the table I was sitting out I d get up and start looking around thinking I had gotten up and brought it with me when in actuality I had been sitting at the table for a number of hours My memory has gotten much better since then but I still struggle at times I was never good at remembering names but even now I sometimes can t remember the names of my aunts or uncles on the other side of my family who I only see on Christmas Eve despite the fact that I have seen them every year for 21 years I still get muscle spasms I don t know if those are linked to side effects that I

    Original URL path: http://www.bphope.com/soundoff-thoughts-on-ect/ (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • ECT: When all else fails | bpHope - bp Magazine Community
    recounts a depression that left him almost incapacitated in his early 40s Neither medication nor psychotherapy gave any relief and finally just at the point that several senior psychiatrists were recommending a lobotomy he was saved by a young resident psychiatrist who insisted on trying electroconvulsive therapy It worked and eventually as Nuland writes his depression disappeared entirely Does it last However for most people it is not a permanent solution The effects are typically short term Relapse is commonplace and thousands of patients depend on maintenance therapy sessions every four to six weeks for years I have dozens of people like that who get it for years and years as does every practitioner in the country says Dr Coffey explaining that this has more to do with the nature of chronic depression than the limits of ECT He continues With people who don t respond to medications you have to administer ECT for the rest of their life The rule in the field is that what got you well keeps you well If a patient s depression is one that requires lifetime treatment with ECT then ECT would be used for life Sherry Godfrey not her real name is a good example When the New York social worker who has bipolar disorder underwent her first course of ECT treatments namely 12 sessions over a four week period in 1998 the results were dramatic Her hallucinations disappeared overnight her depression lifted and she began taking an interest in other people for the first time in many years She went back to work began attending AA meetings giving talks A hospital researcher complimented her on how well she was doing and invited her to participate in a study on bipolar disorder and ECT A couple of months later it all came crashing down and she was rehospitalized retreated and put on a monthly regimen of booster shots With every treatment she says her memory loss and cognitive dysfunction have worsened Many times a day I forget what I had decided to do next Godfrey says Names of familiar people elude me I can remember little or nothing I have read a minute or hour ago but I keep reading because I enjoy it I can t remember which switch controls which light I have to think through whether I want to open the freezer or the fridge door I make many errors doing simple tasks dialing phone numbers copying on the copy machine writing checks I believe I have been affected by ECT and I m in a no man s land right now about what to do says Godrey I am frightened of stopping frightened of relapse My doctor says I ll relapse if I stop If you ask which would you rather suffer from depression or memory loss so far I am electing for the memory loss One of the underlying factors in ECT s growing popularity is economic suggests Nassir Ghaemi MD MPH associate professor of psychiatry and public health and director of the Bipolar Disorder Research Program at Emory University in Atlanta Georgia My main concern is that it has increased a lot in the past 20 years I believe because of managed care in the U S says Dr Ghaemi With managed care you have to justify keeping people in hospitals and ECT is a justifiable reason In my opinion that is the biggest reason for the increased use of ECT It s economic At 2 500 a treatment ECT is often called a cash cow In a 1996 article which is still widely circulated among anti ECT advocates in the journal Psychiatric Times Michael G Wise MD addressed the financial woes that psychiatrists were facing with the growth of managed care Premiums were being cut services reduced and competition was fierce Wise offered his fellow psychiatrists several survival strategies among them ECT He wrote Learn brief focused therapies or specialized treatments such as electroconvulsive therapy One psychiatrist whose practice was self described as strictly inpatient took a week long practicum in ECT and has since developed an inpatient and outpatient ECT service This attitude has led to an almost routine use of ECT in many private American hospitals that rely mostly on managed care payments Dr Ghaemi notes He worries that a symptom oriented approach to mental illness will override the need for more careful attention to diagnosis In other words since ECT can be prescribed for multiple disorders mania psychosis depression a clear diagnosis becomes unnecessary At 2 500 a treatment ECT is often called a cash cow So physicians can get lulled into a false sense of security and don t have to do the hard work of diagnosis says Dr Ghaemi This symptom oriented approach leads to ineffective and potentially harmful forms of pharmacology and I think ECT can be overused in this way It has been overused in the past I think we have to be forthcoming about these problems in the field These days the typical patient is one who fails to show improvement after trying three different medications and is typically a woman 60 years or older It s not surprising women suffer from depression more often than men and doctors tend to be more proactive with older patients That s partly because they frequently can t tolerate medications and partly because depression with its lack of sleep and poor diet can quickly give rise to serious medical complications in the elderly such as dehydration urinary tract infections and renal failure That was the explanation doctors gave Peter W s family when he was admitted to a small psychiatric facility in British Columbia West not his real name was a recently retired college professor in 2000 when he learned that he had prostate cancer After surgery left him incontinent and impotent he plunged into a depression that three different medications did not correct Within a day of being admitted to the psychiatric hospital psychiatrists recommended ECT We were stunned

    Original URL path: http://www.bphope.com/ect-when-all-else-fails/ (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The shocking tale of Andy Behrman | bpHope - bp Magazine Community
    then I didn t know anyone with bipolar and I was pretty aware bp When you were first diagnosed you thought it was a terminal illness Behrman I thought I wouldn t make it to my next birthday The only treatment back then was lithium I saw eight psychiatrists before I got my diagnosis and was misdiagnosed almost always with depression Bipolar patients are misdiagnosed on average eight to 10 times before they see a doctor who diagnoses them correctly Back then I thought they were all right And it s understandable because I only went to those doctors when I was in my down periods feeling terrible I didn t go when I was feeling elated or manic And that s still a problem today people who are bipolar are not so willing to give up their mania bp You devote a lot more space in your book to the manic episodes than the depressive ones Behrman The manic behavior is easier to remember My lows seemed a lot different than the lows that a unipolar depressive feels I wasn t blue My lows were filled with rage anger and irritability I was dysfunctional and agitated really miserable with life and desperately trying to get back to where I had been the day before bp And honestly in Electroboy you make the mania sound almost glamorous Behrman I m always surprised when people say Electroboy is so glamorous If that s glamour I can live without it I think people make the assumption that because you re traveling from New York to Tokyo and Paris you re living a glamorous life But if you re not in control and you can t stop what you re doing if when you re in Paris and you think why not Johannesburg Like I got to the Berlin Wall in 1989 and I thought no big deal it s just some people chopping off little blocks of cement Let s go back to Paris Depressives say oh you re so lucky to be manic depressive you don t know how horrible it is not to be able to get out of bed I completely understand But at the same time bipolar is so frightening When you re flying high you don t know where it s taking you If you re driving you don t know if you re going to crash if you re flying you don t know where your plane is taking you bp Given all that do you ever miss it Behrman Not at all Perhaps there was a period when I did but now if you see where my life is compared to where it was God it s been 12 years There was a period after I left well I was asked to leave my art consulting job when I didn t work for eight years bp What is your life like now Behrman I ve been stable since 1999 I ve left New York and I m living in LA I was married in November 2003 and my wife and I just had our first child Kate Elizabeth on April 27 So I m stable married living in the suburbs and working full time writing two books a sequel to Electroboy and a self help book for bipolar disorder doing my speaking engagements and working on a film version of Electroboy bp How do you think living in Manhattan influenced your behavior Behrman Manhattan is a very convenient place to be bipolar it s the city that never sleeps And a bipolar is a person who never sleeps If you feel like going out for a snack at 4 a m you can find a diner that s never closed you can go to the corner and buy magazines you can go to a club bp LA is hardly a land of peace and quiet Behrman LA might not be the land of peace but try finding a hamburger at 10 o clock at night The potential for getting into trouble is much greater in Manhattan bp Do you think bipolar disorder is being overdiagnosed Behrman I don t think it s overdiagnosed but I do think it s overglamorized in the media People say Oh he must just have bipolar It seems to be the glamorous diagnosis of the moment I could never understand that because it s the least glamorous one I can think of I used to tell my psychiatrists Just take a limb off I m sick of this illness that I can t get under control For six or seven years I was on 37 different medications and I also underwent electroconvulsive therapy because the medications didn t work for me There was nothing that would break my manic cycle I was walking around on drugs that were sedating me and not allowing me to function literally being in my apartment for five years and just watching television And at the same time cycling back and forth from mania to depression It was a really uncomfortable pretty horrible time of my life bp What made you decide to try electroconvulsive therapy Behrman At that critical part of my life I was just begging for help My psychiatrist was initially opposed to it She said You re so sensitive to medications I don t think it s a good idea But she referred me to another doctor who said I was a great candidate Without being too cynical about it I think doctors who treat patients with ECT well it should be a last resort and he didn t know me too long bp How long Behrman About 15 minutes bp And when was your first treatment Behrman The next day It was the only thing left to treat acute mania but I have to tell you I was so unwell at the time it didn t even frighten me The doctor didn t give me a lot of information Just

    Original URL path: http://www.bphope.com/the-shocking-tale-of-andy-behrman/ (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • ECT & Me | bpHope - bp Magazine Community
    treatment In spring 2012 I had my first series I went three times a week for sessions starting at 5 45 a m Being somewhere at that time of the morning was the worst of it I was given a sedative slept through the treatment and woke up groggy about an hour afterwards I suffered no pain Although memory loss can be a side effect the only thing I remember forgetting was the name of the last woman who broke my heart No great loss My treating physician explained 8 to 12 treatments were typical Eight did the trick for me Then came a respite of four glorious months no mania no depression Just normal whatever that is right Without warning Mr D again paid a visit The fog of depression returned and I plummeted back into that particular ring of hell Dante never explored I returned for more ECT but after a dozen sessions the doctor suggested we stop because of increasing potential for memory loss I discovered ECT might not be a permanent cure but for me it was the crucial bridge to recovery It has been more than a year now The combination of ECT good psychiatric care and strict compliance with a new pharmaceutical regime gives me hope for a productive and long life to come Here is my advice Learn about ECT Consult with a psychiatrist known as a stone cold expert Consider it as a possible treatment if the proverbial worse comes to worst ECT is another legitimate tool another weapon in the war on bipolar Tagged with Bipolar Disorder Bipolar Treatment with ECT carl brown ect therapy fall 2013 therapy 1 COMMENT Alexiitha October 18 2015 Reply I just saw your portrayal in Rust It would be cseeidornd a minor part by some but the poignancy and depth you brought was profound and made the movie as good as it was Well done Ma am Ric LEAVE YOUR COMMENT Cancel reply Your email address will not be published Required fields are marked Message First Name or Nickname Do not use full name Email RELATED ARTICLES Bipolar Disorder Demanding Better Care February 5 2016 12 01 am It s been nine years since my late husband David s body was found He d disappeared six weeks earlier in one of the most beautiful and rugged Clinical Pearls Self Care and Managing Bipolar Disorder February 3 2016 12 01 am One of the things I have been focused on in the last few months has been really trying to take care of myself This has Bipolar Letting Love In February 2 2016 12 01 am Several years ago I made the decision to choose God in my life I accepted Jesus had a water baptism and felt ready to put Living With Bipolar Disorder How I Got to Not Meet Oprah January 29 2016 2 59 pm For the last 12 years I have sporadically gone through periods of outstanding clarity and positivity In those

    Original URL path: http://www.bphope.com/ect-me/ (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Resistance training: Builds up your muscles & your mind | bpHope - bp Magazine Community
    the connection between weight training and brain growth As you train your muscles Osborn says you are training all the networks in the nervous system that produce each movement The brain forms new neuronal pathways new synaptic connections The formation of new synapses leads to better processing speed of the brain Disorders Program at Mubarak Al Kabeer Hospital in Kuwait Furthermore he adds the most powerful antioxidant we know is exercise Antioxidants defend against oxidation a process which essentially rusts our cells and contributes to aging disease and other ills Alsuwaidan says higher levels of oxidizing agents known as free radicals have been found in people with bipolar Lack of exercise meanwhile is one of the major factors in chronic inflammation which has been implicated in a multitude of physical and mental conditions including bipolar Poor diet and stress are high on the list too According to Osborn resistance training triggers your body s anti inflammatory response You re stimulating your muscles by traumatizing them affecting the genes in the cells that you are injuring Those genes that regulate inflammation are being switched on he explains The more the muscle is taxed during a training session the greater the adaptive or reparative response he adds which means muscle soreness after a workout can be a welcome sign Resistance training also can be a potent weapon in weight management because muscle burns more calories than fat cells do As you increase your ratio of muscle to body fat you raise your resting metabolism That means your body uses more calories while you re sitting or sleeping Aerobic exercise cranks up your caloric use but doesn t affect your overall metabolism in the same way Plenty of everyday activities count as well carrying heavy grocery bags lifting a toddler and scrubbing floors Body image issues aside maintaining a healthy weight takes away some of the fuel for chronic inflammation Alsuwaidan says Abdominal fat cells are a factory for chronic low level inflammation he explains adding Inflammation is hard on the brain cells Alsuwaidan has a simple prescription exercise intensely enough to sweat at least five days a week for at least 20 to 30 minutes each time He feels strongly that exercise should be the third leg of any treatment program equal in importance to medication and therapy I think it borders on malpractice that we are not so gung ho about exercise he says not entirely tonguein cheek INSERT EXERCISE Meg Matiushyk a stay at home mom from Alberta has embraced the importance of physical activity in managing her bipolar If I include the right and proper exercise into my lifestyle I am less likely to have my emotions take over and suffocate my mental clarity says Matiushyk who was diagnosed in 2012 Matiushyk 39 says a sedentary lifestyle leaves her vulnerable to a negative mindset Thanks to her exercise regimen the anxiety the depression that I have been prone to in the past being in that rut that victim mode is less and less likely To stick with exercising Matiushyk welcomes variety in her workouts A hip injury last year inspired her to do more resistance training partly to prevent further injuries and rebound more easily from bouts of sciatica She might strap weights to her ankles or arms while she does housework or runs errands She also uses resistance bands and elements of yoga and tai chi Holding yoga poses enlists the body s weight to challenge your muscles Downward dog for example builds arm and leg strength while also stretching the spine hips hamstrings and calves for better flexibility A proper plank pose the position you d get into to do pushups works both arms and abs Shifting between downward dog and plank or hopping from a plank to a squat and back ups the ante Thanks to resistance training Matiushyk says I feel like an athlete I feel like my body is strong and flexible and able to move like I need to move SIDEBAR TRAINING ADVICE As with any exercise program remember to start small and build up gradually no matter what form of resistance training you explore Touch base with your physician if you ve been sedentary or have other health issues Brett Osborn DO author of Get Serious A Neurosurgeon s Guide to Optimal Health and Fitness also emphasizes the importance of charting your progress along with proper nutrition and sleep As a weight lifter Osborn suggests a basic deadlift overhead press and pull up or rowing Although this program should only take three to four hours total a week he stresses the importance of intensity although he also cautions against overtraining You have to learn body mindfulness Push yourself to those limits and back off If you are not uncomfortable you are not going to amass the gains biochemical and physical Get comfortable being uncomfortable Proper form matters when using free weights so consider working with a trainer to start with or at least consulting how to videos for the key considerations to injury prevention Warm up before a session of strength training with five minutes of jumping rope jumping lines If you re not familiar with an exercise term like side shuffles there are plenty of videos online to fill you in During your workout stay aware of how long you take between sets so that your heart rate doesn t drop too far To prevent injury your warmup should also include what are known as dynamic stretches side bends trunk twists alternate toe touches arm swings and other movements that loosen you up through moderate movement Static stretches the kind you hold for a while are no longer recommended for cold muscles Don t overlook ways to work muscle building movements into your daily activities For example squat to pick something up rather than bending over do pushups against a kitchen wall while waiting for the teakettle to boil or press your hands repeatedly against the sides of the door frame

    Original URL path: http://www.bphope.com/resistance-training-not-only-builds-up-your-muscles-metabolism-too/ (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive



  •