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  • Across the Miles: Meet Australia’s Sharon Chisholm | bpHope - bp Magazine Community
    there Thank you for such a lovely open email I m sorry that your wife is having a hard time accepting this diagnosis but of course completely understand why I think that for me personally having been treated for depression for 11 years beforehand and knowing through my own experiences that coming off the medication was a very bad idea I was already in a place of medication compliance Having worked as a coach for a number of years and having a great support group I knew that my openness and honesty not only helped others but was part of my own management of my mental health The more I talked about it the more I shared my journey the more supported I felt and the less ashamed I felt It did take me a while to accept that it was something I was going to have to manage for the rest of my life and much like multiple sclerosis there were a number of unknowns about what the future would hold People tell me often how courageous I am for sharing my story but if I kept it hidden then I would be holding myself within that stigma of shame and let s be honest we all have enough emotional stuff to deal with without adding to it unnecessarily lol By sharing my story I am telling my own mind monsters those little voices in our head that tell us we re not good enough that I accept and love myself as I am What I ve realised through my coaching and working with people just like me is that one of our deepest needs as human beings is that of connection with others Therefore when we try to hide who we are try to pretend that we have all our stuff together that we have the most successful business career relationship family what we are doing is trying to prevent the chance of rejection The mostly subconscious belief is if I don t show you who I am you can t reject me A lot of this stems from childhood of course and we all carry baggage into adulthood that we don t even realise is weighing us down I ll share a couple of my struggles that I went through when coming to accept my diagnosis A bit of background my ups hypomania ALWAYS felt good exciting energy fuelled highly creative and connected to the energy of others I had so many ideas SO many and with every new business idea came the need to spend vast amounts of money in setting them up Of course this idea was sooooo much better than the last one and this time it will be a huge success and I ll be famous and respected and earning lots of money and we won t have to worry ever again These ups were always followed swiftly with a very deep and dark low where I simply couldn t understand why last week I couldn t stop working laughing thinking and this week even going to the toilet felt like running a marathon A month or two later would follow a period of fairly level mood before I went on the incline to hypomania again Because the downs were so hideous and the ups so wonderful I only ever saw the doctor when I was depressed therefore there was no inkling that it might be Bipolar When I filled in the mood questionnaire and it asked about rapid speech increased sexual activity uncontrolled spending they didn t fit my symptoms so I dismissed it First struggle will my ability to create to write to connect to succeed disappear when I m on mood stabilisers What if my creativity and abilities are tied up in the hypomania What if I m not who I thought I was all these years What does it say about me Will I ever feel good again or will my mood from now on always be slightly dulled by the medication What I ve discovered since being on the meds is that not only am I still creative connected and able to write but I m also a lot more productive Rather than starting 10 different projects or articles at once and not actually finishing any of them I m a lot more focused because my brain isn t trying to do 43 things at one time Through journaling and speaking with others who have Bipolar I have discovered that actually I know exactly who I am having Bipolar doesn t give me compassion or empathy or kindness or humour that s just innate to who I am and my purpose is to help others I feel far better now than I did before because I m stable and not up and down like a yoyo Being on the rollercoaster is exhausting and scary Second struggle what does this mean for my future and the future of my family Well it s funny because in many ways it s been healing My relationship with my husband is much better because he s not feeling anger and resentment about my mood changes and spending habits it s hard not to think someone s just being selfish when they re spending all the family money and I m not feeling guilty and confused about why I behave the way I do So we re able to communicate from a better place of knowledge and understanding Because self care is so vital when you have a mental illness I have learned to tell my husband what I need which I find very challenging so when I m agitated I say to my kids I m not having a good day today and that noise is making me feel anxious and they know that I m not just being mean or impatient I can say to my husband I really don t feel like cooking tonight or I need to go and

    Original URL path: http://www.bphope.com/blog/across-the-miles-meet-australias-sharon-chisholm/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Balancing Motherhood & Bipolar: Brave New World | bpHope - bp Magazine Community
    at hyper speed a symptom known as pressured speech but she wasn t making much sense A doctor dismissed the incident as lack of sleep but 10 days later while visiting her parents in Florida for the holidays Marshall experienced another manic episode She spent Christmas Day in a psych ward With a tentative diagnosis of bipolar Marshall returned to Virginia and her pressure cooker job Her anxiety level stayed sky high and it became clear she would have to resign This set the stage for the darkest year of Marshall s life It just was devastating for me to come to the realization that I have a mental illness and I can t even work she says of her state of mind back then Without the job to define her I didn t know who I was anymore Marshall fell into a very dark clinical depression that lasted nearly a year When a trusted psychiatrist definitively diagnosed her with bipolar I she started taking medication that worked Four months later she felt her upbeat personality returning Marshall tried tapering off her dosage during her pregnancies but learned that doesn t work out well for her After her son was born in 2008 she experienced postpartum psychosis When she was pregnant with her daughter mania hit after just a few weeks off her meds and she had to be hospitalized Since then she s been vigilant about maintaining her medication regimen Lack of sleep is her other main trigger so she s also vigilant about protecting her rest She has a rule about being in bed before midnight Even when she s working on a project in the evening she forces herself to shut it down end of excerpt Tagged with Bipolar disclosure Fall 2015 highlight life changes Mother parenting About the author Lori Hile Has 1 Article Lori Hile is a Chicago based freelance writer whose work has appeared in regional and national publications She is the author of 12 nonfiction books for young audiences LEAVE YOUR COMMENT Cancel reply Your email address will not be published Required fields are marked Message First Name or Nickname Do not use full name Email RELATED ARTICLES Blog Mental Illness in Catholic Schools Catholic Prejudice February 8 2016 12 01 am I was raised a catholic My parents were catholic their parents were catholic all my neighbors and most of my friends were catholic As a Living with Bipolar Be Inspired to Forgive and Ask for Forgiveness February 6 2016 12 01 am This Swedish proverb Love me when I least deserve it because that s when I really need it is so true For us all For me Diabetes II Versus Bipolar II The Power of Stigma February 5 2016 3 49 pm When my husband was diagnosed with diabetes II doctors nutritionists nurses friends family members coworkers everyone was terribly concerned No one doubted his diagnosis I Am Bipolar Should I Have Children January 26 2016 12 01 am In

    Original URL path: http://www.bphope.com/balancing-motherhood-bipolar-brave-new-world/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Bipolar Husband, Wife, Parent | bpHope - bp Magazine Community - Part 3
    trap By BP Readers November 8 2008 1 32 am It s not uncommon for people with bipolar disorder to become so involved with their own challenges that relationships with friends and family suffer If you Read more The art of adjustment By Beth Brownsberger Mader May 28 2008 2 19 pm Recently I found a sketchbook from art school that had been hidden away since the early 1990s One drawing is of a bunch of grapes Read more Scenes from a marriage By Laura Yeager February 8 2008 2 03 am By Laura Yeager I m no psychiatrist but maybe I should be A little more than 10 years ago I got married a big Read more Partners for life By Michelle Roberts February 8 2007 2 41 am Beating the marriage odds By Michelle Roberts Daniel a computer software engineer in Portland Oregon was used to solving complicated problems But when Read more SoundOFF Beating the marriage odds By BP Readers February 8 2007 2 37 am Maintaining a long term relationship or marriage when one partner has bipolar disorder is a challenge Many couples make it work How have you succeeded in Read more Playing to win Creating your wellness team By Stephanie Stephens November 8 2006 3 17 am By Stephanie Stephens Whether you have a fabulous insurance plan or are coping in a public system you the consumer are the leader of your Read more SoundOFF Creating your wellness team By BP Readers November 8 2006 3 09 am Have you built a wellness team of people to support you in your recovery We invite you to share your experience Our readers respond Read more PREVIOUS 1 2 3 4 NEXT CURRENT ISSUE Recent Issues October 1 2015 11 50 am Fall 2015 BIPOLAR DEPRESSION Letting the light in By Robin L Flanigan Strategies to dispel the darkness of bipolar depression starting with the good enough theory taking Read more August 3 2015 9 12 am Summer 2015 MARY LAMBERT SPREADING THE LOVE By Stephanie Stephens Singer songwriter Mary Lambert puts it all out there in her hit Secrets and she lives the Read more April 1 2015 11 37 am Spring 2015 TAME YOUR TRIGGERS By Robin L Flanigan From major life events to emotional patterns we all have stressors that are likely to spark Read more January 1 2015 5 36 am Winter 2015 OUR LEADING LADY CARRIE FISHER By Stephanie Stephens Carrie Fisher is returning as Princess Leia in a new Star Wars movie but she s always been Read more SoundOFF YOU YOUR PSYCHIATRIST The relationship between you and your psychiatrist can influence your recovery What qualities do you think are important in a psychiatrist In what ways has your doctor helped you the most Click here to reply CURRENT RESEARCH The Prechter Fund s Fight to Cure Bipolar Disorder 1 28 2016 Brain connectivity outweighs genetics 1 27 2016 Heinz C Prechter Bipolar Research Fund 1 25 2016 Looking for

    Original URL path: http://www.bphope.com/relationships/spouse-partners/page/3/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Bipolar Husband, Wife, Parent | bpHope - bp Magazine Community - Part 4
    stories practical advice and tips on maintaining healthy relationships with your husband wife or partner PREVIOUS 1 2 3 4 The big payoff of well chosen words By Stephen Propst November 8 2006 2 56 am By Stephen Propst You may think that talk is cheap But when words are used thoughtlessly carelessly or hurtfully they can take a heavy Read more People like me By Sara Solovitch August 8 2006 3 53 am By Sara Solovitch Every man woman and child who struggles with bipolar disorder struggles in a different way That much is obvious from six Read more Mind over mood Points to ponder By Stephen Propst November 8 2005 7 44 am 10 Ways to Support Someone with Bipolar By Stephen Propst For those of us who have bipolar disorder we are kidding ourselves if we Read more PREVIOUS 1 2 3 4 CURRENT ISSUE Recent Issues October 1 2015 11 50 am Fall 2015 BIPOLAR DEPRESSION Letting the light in By Robin L Flanigan Strategies to dispel the darkness of bipolar depression starting with the good enough theory taking Read more August 3 2015 9 12 am Summer 2015 MARY LAMBERT SPREADING THE LOVE By Stephanie Stephens Singer songwriter Mary Lambert puts it all out there in her hit Secrets and she lives the Read more April 1 2015 11 37 am Spring 2015 TAME YOUR TRIGGERS By Robin L Flanigan From major life events to emotional patterns we all have stressors that are likely to spark Read more January 1 2015 5 36 am Winter 2015 OUR LEADING LADY CARRIE FISHER By Stephanie Stephens Carrie Fisher is returning as Princess Leia in a new Star Wars movie but she s always been Read more SoundOFF YOU YOUR PSYCHIATRIST The relationship between you and your psychiatrist can influence your recovery What qualities do you think are important in a psychiatrist In what ways has your doctor helped you the most Click here to reply CURRENT RESEARCH The Prechter Fund s Fight to Cure Bipolar Disorder 1 28 2016 Brain connectivity outweighs genetics 1 27 2016 Heinz C Prechter Bipolar Research Fund 1 25 2016 Looking for Motivation Enjoying the Task at Hand Will Matter Once You Start 1 20 2016 Immune cells linked to bipolar symptoms 1 11 2016 CONNECT Letter to the Editor Write to us SoundOFF Question On My Mind Write an essay Talk to bp Writers Forum Join our community Blog Read and comment Home About Us Privacy Forum Professional Writers Advertising Contact Us Partners Page Cart Subscribe Back to Top Copyright 2015 BpHope All Rights Reserved Newsletter Signup Hope Harmony Headlines is bp Magazine s e newsletter offering the latest research news healthy lifestyle features and inspirational profiles for our bipolar community If you are a human and are seeing this field please leave it blank Fields marked with a are required Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua And Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain

    Original URL path: http://www.bphope.com/relationships/spouse-partners/page/4/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Kay Redfield Jamison: Risk and reward | bpHope - bp Magazine Community
    25 pages She did suspend her clinical practice and it was as painful as she had anticipated Even now she told bp Magazine after her talk I miss seeing patients MESSAGE OF HOPE An Unquiet Mind gave Jamison a second career as an advocate She has reached mass audiences through numerous interviews and appearances on shows like Larry King Live and Oprah In her countless speaking engagements she often takes a more personal approach Although Redfield is reticent about the details of her mood symptoms and management approach she steadfastly offers hope to the children adolescents and college students she addresses in talks across the country She told the symposium audience that many students who share her illness ask if she worries about getting sick again And I say yes of course I worry every day I tell them that it s hard to get well and it s hard to stay well but it certainly can be done She shared an anecdote about a schoolboy who approached her after a speech in Colorado and put his hand in hers asking if she was really OK She reached into her purse pulled out a well loved Bugs Bunny keychain she d carried for years and gave it to the child I told him it was my extra lucky charm because it had not just one rabbit s foot but four she said just before the crowd rose to a standing ovation A small smile appeared I assured him that Bugs Bunny would bring him the same good luck he had brought me Tagged with Bipolar Bipolar and Suicide depression disclosure highlight Kay Redfield Jamison stigma Touched by Fire Unquiet Mind Winter 2014 About the author Maureen Salamon Has 1 Article Maureen Salamon is a freelance health writer based in New Jersey She has written for the New York Times HealthDay CNN com and other media outlets as well as clients in the health care field 37 COMMENTS Matt January 14 2015 Reply I m always so glad to see any media coverage on Kay Jamison Her book was the truly the first and one of only a few still that really impacted me and my recovery Thank you for continuing to share her story Coop January 14 2015 Reply OMG Matt I was thinking the same thing She is an inspiration Pamster January 23 2015 Reply Kay Jamison is and always will be my hero An Unquiet Mind was outstanding and gave me hope All that she has accomplished in spite of having bipolar is mind blowing I live under 50 miles from Johns Hopkins If she were scheduled to speak there I d BE there Yoya August 28 2015 Reply Consider that in spite of having bipolar is stigmatizing language in two ways Stating in spite of implies that she is somehow less than because of her disease and there is more positive recovery oriented language to use such as by living well with bipolar disorder choosing treatment for her bipolar disorder or overcoming barriers to stigma See how you can promote choice and empowerment with that language and perhaps remove a conversational barrier to your self or others confronting serious persistent mental health conditions Also having bipolar is not the preferred language No one is bipolar a bipolar or has bipolar the way one has the cooties You can say a person lives with bipolar disorder experiences bipolar disorder or is diagnosed with bipolar disorder Also suffering from bipolar disorder is a phrase that is not preferred either as it de emphasizes recovery options If the person prefers the term manic depressive illness as Dr Redfield Jamison does and the article points out then code switch to it out of respect Of course your own story of finding hope in her is encouraging and I thank you for sharing it I hope you can find this information useful to future discussions Language matters especially in our self talk and how we educate others I learned a lot of this from working with peer specialists and the National Alliance on Mental Illness NAMI Bronny September 3 2015 Reply Beautifully written Thanks Yoya Stacey L February 26 2015 Reply She is a hero I wish more professionals would accept themselves enough to live well with this disease My own mother is also a clinical psychologist but refuses to acknowledge her own challenges with this I had known that I carried on the curse since high school but I myself am a creative entity and have learned to accept and live well with my disorder I share it openly and help others Yoya August 28 2015 Reply I share your wish more professionals would accept themselves enough to live well with this disease It s a challenge for sure The field and public could do more to allow for diversity in abilities Now after being a creative entity who share s it openly do you view bipolar disorder as the curse As Dr Redfield Jamison suggests in Touched by Fire is it possible you we are creative because of beautiful minds Keep it mentally interesting fellow ally Barbara February 26 2015 Reply I am always proud of those who share they have bipolar disorder illness It gives me comfort when I can relate to someone so I can make sense of the illness I only disclose my illness to those I trust My disclosure is to help them cope with their struggle of depression or bipolar disorder illness What frustrates me is other illnesses have open arms for their healing and recuperating process There is far little compassion or empathy given for mental illness I described my experience as a brain illness When I read that is exactly what the illness I felt better I now explain that some people need medicine for their brains I miss my highs I felt I could do anything and juggle all the activities One of most important things now is to work again I have been out of work for 18 months The longest I have ever been out of work Before I got sick I just found my niche As someone in their 40 s I was elated to discover there is a field I wanted to work in with an incredible passion My career will soon be back on track I have been blessed with family who have been amazing Thank you Dr Jamison for sharing your story I can hardly wait to read your books Yoya August 28 2015 Reply I am grateful there are people who think like you and live as you do Barbara Thank you for sharing your story Our identity and self esteem are so often linked to the meaning we give our work across the lifetime that it is no wonder you long to return to work I think you are to be commended for taking the time to heal and doing whatever steps to return that you may or may not credit yourself for doing It takes courage and you re becoming proficient at starting over not lagging behind In my lived experience sometimes the hardest thing especially for those of us who enjoy our hypomania and even the mania was to be still 40s or not my understanding of work is that it develops and there are interventions out there to help Pamster February 26 2015 Reply Dr Jamison is my hero I m not someone brilliant or greatly talented whose name will go down in history like hers and others Reading her books helped save my life It took over 20 some years to get the correct diagnosis of Bipolar II At first I was angry in denial embarrassed the whole gamut Then acception came as I began researching everywhere I could think of I admire Dr Jamison so much and I would be honored to meet her Hopkins is only less than an hour away Liz w February 27 2015 Reply This woman is my heroine I read Manic Depressive Illness after my diagnosis in college and have read everything since A stellar writer of the most eloquent caliber Faith February 27 2015 Reply This book was one of the best ones I read when I was just starting into Recovery in 1996 Because of Kay Redfield Jamison s book I also have been brave enough to start another business after four failures I have been in business 11 years now Staying in one business is the stability of success for myself Thank you Kay for disclosing your bipolar diagnosis Yoya August 28 2015 Reply Hearing your story of failing four times but getting another business going on the 4th try is inspiring to me Thank you for sharing Faith kenny m February 27 2015 Reply I was diagnosed 29 years ago as manic depressive I sti ll struggle with the illness every day I have always applauded dr Jamison Kathy February 27 2015 Reply As a psych RN and mother of two mentally ill children one of whom died by suicide at age 25 I have been totally comforted by the writings of Kay Redfield Jamison You ve helped me by telling your story and the hope you are offering to those of us whose loved ones are affected I know that if my beloved daughter had read your books her life may have been saved You are my hero Paige February 28 2015 Reply it s hard to get well and it s hard to stay well but it certainly can be done I especially appreciate the way she never sugar coats or demonizes bipolar Tommy G March 2 2015 Reply Amazing To be comfortable in ones own skin is the ultimate way to walk through life You are an inspiration to all of us with this mental condition God bless you Eileen June 6 2015 Reply I worked for NIMH for 32 years and am fighting like hell for my retirement I had only about 6 more years to go until I could retire and would have been set not rich by any means but not homeless as I am now I literally was removed from my living space and have no money It s been three years and I still am fighting for my rights as a person with bi polar this and schizophrenia runs in my family I am at the end of my rope and the stress of this has really put me over the edge OPM has been processing this for almost three years and nothing but 1000 00 I can t live this way and am running out of options living in a rented room with boxes yet to unpack I was fired for being ill I ve sent letters to NIMH explaining I can t understand why this happened and why I can t get the help I need I m so done at this point I ve failed everything in my life and the one thing I was proud of was keeping a job for 32 years they basically said I was no longer needed and nobody wants to hear that they also promised me it would be alright Nothing is alright and nothing has been done NIMH is the worst place to work b c they stigmatize the very employees that work there I know two who have killed themselves so far I want to know how this can happen because I can no longer work Nami has not helped me either yet I m disgusted with the system and I m not gonna make it if I don t make any money I put money into that retirement and I m very angry at how this was done It was purely wrong and very hurtful I never heard from a soul after that it is like I never existed Stigmatization NIMH has a no stigmatization policy for any type of disability I worked very hard I could for as long as I could stand it What do I do now And I worked for NIMH for those 32 years Pissed off and pissed on Yoya August 28 2015 Reply Eileen I want a solution for you as well I don t think your story so clearly full of hurting and frustration is misplaced here I have been pissed on and pissed off as you say by the very institutions and people who profess stigma free workplaces You are not alone and I think your tenacity and ferocious self advocacy will see you through to the other side Doesn t unpack those boxes I get it Does this give you comfort I care about you and want to prevent circumstances such as yours from happening to others Tell us when you overcome these obstacles how you did it Winky August 25 2015 Reply Kay Jamison is admired by me for her advocacy on mental health particularly bipolar disorder which she prefers to label manic depressive illness I am a soft advocate myself having spoken at my women s spirituality group and at two different NAMI classes of Family to Family I have had bipolar I disorder for the last 45 years I first spoke about it publicly in 2013 and am willing to speak again if the situation presents itself In my talk I speak about what it is like having a bipolar episode all the grandeur and all the anguish and followed by the deep depression Now at age 64 I am still employed part time as a substitute teacher and have not revealed my disorder to them I too only tell those in my community that I trust There is still stigma out there and perhaps someday in the future I will be able to disclose to all Yoya August 28 2015 Reply I believe you are doing all you can I applaud you for your efforts in your social sphere NAMI Family 2 Family and community of faith That s my kind of brave Ann August 25 2015 Reply When I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in 1990 there were very few books on the subject Dr Jamison s book had an impact on me I hated taking lithium and other psychotropic drugs but my first manic episode was so terrible I kept taking them Dr Jamison s book enforced how important it was to take my medication Six years ago it became necessary to come off the lithium and switch to Lamitical because of kidney problems and I was scared to death I did have an episode right after that but since then I have tried really hard to control the things I can by living a healthy life and controlling stress I gave up my career as a special needs teacher because of the stress Teaching was not the problem it was all the other stuff I now work as a teacher s aide I get to work with the students and not do the stressful stuff It still hurts after two years to have quit my job but my mental health is so much more important Chery August 25 2015 Reply This is such an inspiration An Unquiet Mind is the first book I read after my diagnosis I am part of the performance faculty in a university school of music and I often struggle with the question of disclosure The majority of my students struggle with either mood or anxiety disorders or both to some degree and they could benefit from my experiences But the enormous implications of disclosure are scary and you just never know how you ll be received and you ve opened Pandora s box so there s no going back Thanks for this article Dr Jamison s experiences and example give us all hope Jim August 25 2015 Reply I read her book about a year before I was diagnosed with bipolar after my son was diagnosed I feel that it is one of the reasons I took the diagnoses so well more as a message of hope than a death sentence as I ve heard other people describe their initial feelings after diagnosis Amusingly while I was reading an Unquiet Mind and other bipolar books I kept thinking that they described me better than my son Then I laughed at myself for being a hypochondriac Sally August 25 2015 Reply I was reading her books when I was diagnosed I m sure reading her personal accounts that were similar to mine made me accept my diagnosis sooner It felt like she was there with me during that confusing and dark time Walt August 26 2015 Reply Hello I didn t know that my Dad brothers sisters and for years I had mustard up the courage to see a Doctor and then I was diagnosed with bipolar and felt sadness and guilt that came on me angry at my self then understanding where all of where this came from I was placed on Medicine taking things in Life at a different way much clearer those around me who know my illness that Love me and don t judge me I have to thank the Good Lord thanks for Listening Walt Cary August 25 2015 Reply Why can t someone who has disclosed their mental illness work as a clinical therapist Yoya August 28 2015 Reply I want to know this seek clarification for this concern query also H August 25 2015 Reply Correct spelling is Johns Hopkins lady behind the mask August 26 2015 Reply I find it outrageous that people who acknowledge their dx are not allowed to see pts but people who remain in hiding continue to do so A peer support specialist with a master s degree asked me one day with considerable bitterness why her compensation was capped at 14 per hour when her supervisor also diagnosed but in hiding earned 60K with benefits People living successfully with dx are precisely the people most capable of

    Original URL path: http://www.bphope.com/kay-redfield-jamison-risk-and-reward/ (2016-02-14)
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  • The Best Reason to Come Out of The Bipolar Closet | bpHope - bp Magazine Community
    struggle I am over committed because I tend to take on a lot when I am feeling good But then I do my best to honor my commitments What do you have to say Alyssa November 17 2015 Reply Ginger I feel just like you do about all of those issues you wrote about I don t have any answers except maybe accept yourself craggy spots and all because that would be my Dad s advice Gabe thanks for your courage again I think you are right it is important that we show people how we successfully live with this disease disorder illness Some people will still be judgey but some will be inspired and yet more will hopefully be educated Gloinjo November 17 2015 Reply Coming out is so liberating I am not ashamed of myself or my disorder and I really try to be an advocate despite my slow progress People I have known for years have also shared the stories with me about their own private mental illness demons and this in itself is such a great source of comfort and belonging Many of the people that were once in my life continue to take the neutral road by simply not acknowledging my illness nor commenting on my bipolar posts in support I just take the view that much of what I say hits too close to home Their denial of my problems or their own is only toxic to themselves It hurts but we learn who are keepers in our life and who are not Julia November 17 2015 Reply I told one coworker I thought we were friends she went straight to my manager who met with me to tell me she thinks all mentally ill people are unstable if she had known before she wouldn t have let me work for their practice the first day then fired me 2 weeks a later I personally will never tell anyone else I wish we could all live openly so people would not stigmatize those of us just trying to live our lives rockstar November 17 2015 Reply What a lovely article Thank you Alex November 17 2015 Reply Yes I have bipolar disorder I wish I could tell the whole world about it but I m afraid to I m afraid to be judge or stigmatized I usually tell people when I get to know them and I feel comfortable telling them Usually if someone opens up about a mental illness they have experienced I tell them mine But I kind of wish I could come out on Facebook and make an official announcement I want everyone to know I don t know if saying it on Facebook is the right way to go either I want people to understand the illness Alexandra November 21 2015 Reply I feel the exact same way you do Alex Im probably wrong for thinking this but I feel that the world thinks bipolar crazy no matter if you re type one or two they just need to hear the B word I would love to tell everyone I know that I m Bipolar Type 2 but I feel it will go one of two ways people will understand because they ve been somewhat educated in mental illness one way or another or they will look at you as a completely different person because of the terrible stereotypes associated with BP I would love to stand up and not care what people think of me but its such a scary thought to think if I m honest people might think I m crazy and I m most definitely ok with that because I M NOT CRAZY I m not sure how I would even go about coming out of the BP closet but I really don t think any type of social media is the way to go unless you re 100 ready to know that everyone now knows your secret but you might not ever truly know how they feel about you Alexandra November 21 2015 Reply I feel the exact same way you do Alex Im probably wrong for thinking this but I feel that the world thinks bipolar crazy no matter if you re type one or two they just need to hear the B word I would love to tell everyone I know that I m Bipolar Type 2 but I feel it will go one of two ways people will understand because they ve been somewhat educated in mental illness one way or another or they will look at you as a completely different person because of the terrible stereotypes associated with BP I would love to stand up and not care what people think of me but its such a scary thought to think if I m honest people might think I m crazy and I m most definitely ok with that because I M NOT CRAZY I m not sure how I would even go about coming out of the BP closet but I really don t think any type of social media is the way to go unless you re 100 ready to know that everyone now knows your secret but you might not ever truly know how they feel about you Mike November 17 2015 Reply I have been wanting to come out for a long time My doctor has warned me against it saying that if I tell work everything that goes wrong from then on would be blamed on me I have also lost a job because of it When I first got ill and went into pyscosis they fired me Luckily a doctor got me onto short term disability I couldn t wait to go back to work After 3 months I told them I was ready they put me back on Then in the next sentence laid me off I liked this artical because I get the benefit of showing the well side of bi polar I desperately want to be free It is just very hard to put my trust in others especially at work For now I look at it that I am not special Everyone has ups and downs Now my mistakes can be put down to one of those days Maybe that is better than putting a label on it Peace and love to all Katie December 23 2015 Reply First of all I m 20 and I have only known about my bipolar II disorder since July 2015 Personally I feel that the more normalcy that you can have the better off you are I don t want stigma attached to me or my family I don t want anyone to think I deserve special things because I m bipolar and I don t want anyone to think that I am not capable because I m bipolar It s not like sexuality or something Being bipolar means having an illness that you have for your entire life It s a struggle and its unpredictable and can sometimes result in lost relationships and tarnished opportunities If people know they fan blame things on you easier They ll use the crazy word talk about you behind your back etc Save yourself the worry and keep it to yourself Be sure to tell anyone that you live with though otherwise they may not understand Robert Mackey November 23 2015 Reply I fully believe being open and transparent about our illness is a great way to go People cannot empathize with something they don t know exists I appreciate that being open about a mental illness is anything but easy due to mental illness stigma I believe the more people that come out of the closet the more support the mentally ill will get Unfortunately most people only see negative headlines about a bipolar individual doing horrific acts Due to this association stigma is created If more people come out about their mental illness it would put a face and a name to the illness Rather than associating mental illness with bad behaviour people would associate mental illness with the individuals they personally know who are open about the illness Mike November 26 2015 Reply Those I care about know and that s all that matters IAlso have two very supportive Drs personal and the one at work believe it or not I work for the government I am lucky I have a great benefit plan that lets me stay home for long periods of recovery without consequence and 100 drug coverage I thought about coming out too but am scared of being judged or stigmatized Janet December 23 2015 Reply I m 62 years old I was diagnosed when I was 30 I experienced my first high and low when I was 16 The high was fun but the low was so bad I ate more than usual and I developed stretch marks Then when the low wore off I lost weight and life was fun again My 20 s were horrible The ups were pretty fun lasting up to 3 months but I wore myself out every time I d go into a dark depression that lasted anywhere from 3 8 months I d gain weight every time and slept more than usual I thought I was just bored I was a single parent in college I was pretty lonely After I was diagnosed it took several years to fine tune the medication that worked best for me I received a Bachelors of Science in Nursing and just retired after working in the psychiatric field I m proud that I was able to be a productive citizen It wasn t easy and I let very few people know I was bipolar especially working in the mental health field I d like to have life insurance applied through the Costco program but was denied because I m bipolar That s just not right particularly after being stable on medication and having excellent psychiatric care I m one of the lucky ones and I know it I ve worked with many many unfortunate people who are so ill they cannot work and or they are homeless and are battling their own demons It s time to have appropriate mental health care and monetary support from the government to help individuals who have a debilitating disease they did not ask for Kate December 24 2015 Reply I came out of the Bipolar closet two year ago after having been in recovery for 15 plus years My biggest fear was my professional trajectory Being open and boldly telling my story in an effort to showcase the fact that every example of the diagnoses is different and that stigma can t be real could damn me from a robust professional future But to make the move out of shame and silence I had to realize a I m not my diagnoses and need not be a victim and 2 if an organization doesn t want to hire me because I manage a diagnoses of bipolar I with rapid cycling and psychosis then I don t truly want to work for that particularly hiring entity After better understanding THAT the rest became relatively easily Kate Lynch O Neil MelB December 24 2015 Reply First let me start by saying I REALLY liked the last paragraph of that article ROFL A little bp humor is rare in life Second I have seen both sides of this coin When I hid it I was respected at work I never felt like I was being treated with kid gloves I never felt my emotions were viewed as inappropriate and I felt confident that I was a valued employee I did well However I did take a job where I actually worked with folks who had various disabilities They were the clients Why not come out I thought In this setting I saw myself as a valuable resource someone who had been there and managed to become successful WRONG Even in the agencies tasked with helping folks with this disorder prejudice is alive and well In fact because these trained professionals have had so much experience with people who have not attained the level I did I was treated as if I was less intelligent emotionally fragile and sad to say less trustworthy Ironically another woman in my office came out about her bipolar diagnosis a few months before I did Although at first we both thought we were valued by our employer within a few short years I had been constructively discharged and she was outright fired The stigma that exists among the professionals who are tasked with being our advocates is covert and omniscient Frankly I would NEVER advise anyone try doing their advocacy work in the same place they earn their living UNLESS their job title requires it That is unless you are actually paid to be a mental health advocate don t risk your livelihood trying to add this to your job description Frankly there is just too much work that still needs to be done and the professionals have become proficient at avoiding any obvious signs of discrimination The ADA is not worth the paper it s written on in these environments Everyone please do advocate but unless your job title explicitly says mental health advocate at work avoid personal examples lest someone take it personally and make you an example Hugs HOS December 24 2015 Reply This was a very great article and an important comment to read I constantly think about going all the way with my illness Proudly saying that I have bipolar mania yet I do my best to live a stable and normal life However I fear that what happened to you and your co worker will always be something I might struggle with It s certainly a horrid thing to think about and even fathom for a second that is unless you re luckily living in a community that can learn to appreciate your being rather then judge through stigma I really wish to announce it more properly as I want to be a novelist and poet However I don t want people to think that my illness is all that I m worth It would also be outrageous for others to take particular interest or pity in me just because I m bipolar Even then I m still sitting at two roads of coming out or staying hidden Truly when I m normal it feels like I ll never reveal this part of me but then when I m in mania my soul cries out to say just tell everyone let people understand that the person they ve known or shall know of has been bipolar all along Whether people can understand or come to accept me for such a case then so be it I ll at least have some dull pride in surviving a life long mental illness without medication out of pure stubborn hope Stephanie January 6 2016 Reply HOS I wasn t given a bipolar diagnosis until I was in my 40s although I have been medicated for depression since my teenage years Taking into consideration all the experiences I have had on the job in school in personal relationships yes and even on Facebook my advice to you is to NEVER trust your strong convictions your intense emotions or your deep feelings of belonging when you are anywhere NEAR mania Some of the depressive episodes I have lived through devastated me but other than the obvious neglect in the area of self care the effects were mostly invisible to everyone but my family But MANIA now that s a totally different kind of crazy I ve lost jobs over that for irrational behavior that was obvious to EVERYONE but me I had to quit school because of uncontrolled mania I felt fantastic But then one day I couldn t leave my dorm room I lost my scholarship I lost all my friends My roommate refused to come into our room when I was there So if you re anywhere near manic it doesn t matter how comfortable or excepted you feel at work because your mind can t be trusted to tell you the truth I felt loved and popular and adored by all until I attacked my birthday cake with a butcher knife and they had to evacuate the restaurant Those friends never spoke to me again I guess I would say if you want to be an author and a poet go ahead and do those things And then after you re famous you can come out in an interview in The New Yorker I hate to be the one to burst your bubble but this is my personal truth and it s the only way I can tell it knowing what I know Anita January 6 2016 Reply I have had bipolar for 30 years I am now 63 years old Absolutely nothing good can come from revealing you are bipolar to anyone I tried in the past but all I get in return are people who studder and stammer and don t know what to say Then I find them distancing themselves from me I get the same reaction whether it is family or friends It is like someone who is always complaining to have a bad back even though they have had umpteen surgeries It is getting old hearing about it Same thing People think My God haven t you been cured yet Your major reason for revealing was in case you ever have an episode in public If you are being medicated like you should be then that event would rarily rarily occur Besides isn t anything a lay person could do to help anyway it s not like they could give you cpr or perform the heimlick maneuver You are especially taking a big risk if you tell your

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  • 3 Simple Ways to Raise Awareness about Bipolar Disorder | bpHope - bp Magazine Community
    Raise Awareness About the author Gabe Howard Has 19 Articles Gabe Howard is a professional speaker award winning writer and mental health coach who battles bipolar 1 and anxiety disorders everyday Diagnosed in 2003 he has made it his mission to put a human face on what it means to live with bipolar disorder Gabe was the recipient of the 2014 Mental Health America Norman Guitry Award placed second in HealthCentral s LiveBold competition a Psych Central 2014 Mental Health hero was a 2015 WEGO Health Awards Finalist in the Health Activist Category as well as received a Best of the Web Blog award To work with Gabe please contact him via his website at www GabeHoward com or e mail Gabe GabeHoward com 3 COMMENTS Deb October 8 2015 Reply Nice article For too many years I would not speak about my illness Now I do Thanks for sharing Beth A Crawley October 9 2015 Reply I was diagnosed this year 2015 with Bipolar Disorder I have been fighting depression since 1985 but was never properly diagnosed over the years I am really having a hard time dealing with it I had a breakdown in March 2015 and was hospitalized and that s when I was diagnosed Through it my marriage suffered and my husband divorced me cause I self medicated and he divorced me because of it That has really shook my world cause he was diagnosed years ago with Manic depression but does not take meds today but thinks he deals with his Manic depression just fine When I came out of the Hospital he would not even speak to me Sad that he can t face his own illness but leave me cause I self medicated and didn t understand I had Bipolar Disorder I take my meds but do not have ins right now and need a dr to prescribe them to me and I can tell I am not on them katia October 9 2015 Reply When I was first diagnosed with Bipolar 11 years ago I told friends I thought it was true what people said It s like any disease no shame blah blah blah I certainly wasn t ashamed I was relieved to know what was happening to me It had a name But I soon learned to hide and cover up If you did anything was wrong angry or emotional you were looked at like you were being Bipolar You lose respect and credibility It takes a bravery to come out in this society and work in the real world I have come out again It s very liberating To come to terms and come out it helps to be ready I see a change in the past 10 years of peoples attitudes It s because of these forerunners making a difference Thank you to all of you unknown warriors out there LEAVE YOUR COMMENT Cancel reply Your email address will not be published Required fields are marked Message First

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  • Tragedy, Mental Health & Logic | bpHope - bp Magazine Community
    to remember it that we who live with and manage mental illness everyday know too that it is we that also often have a far better understanding of our emotions and behavior We habitually take control of our actions We reflect upon our choices And we use coping skills in ways sometimes better and with more personal responsibility than those without a diagnosis We will not stand for the stigma We will stand for logical fair reasoning Tagged with Beth Mader hot topics Oregon shooting stigma using logic About the author Beth Brownsberger Mader Has 199 Articles Beth Brownsberger Mader was diagnosed with bipolar type II disorder and C PTSD in 2004 at age 38 after decades of confusion and pain In the past decade she has studied the two disorders worked in peer support and sought a path to her own wellness Today Beth works as a freelance writer and artist She became a contributing editor featured columnist for BP Magazine in 2007 and blogger for bpHope in 2011 Beth holds a B A from Colorado College and M F A from University of Denver Beth s primary area of interest is the relationship between bipolar and PTSD She is currently working on a memoir and building a body of artwork focusing on her recovery Check out Beth s blog at http www bessiebandaidrinkiewater wordpress com 2 COMMENTS James October 7 2015 Reply The thing which makes me fearful is that there isn t a strong crazy people lobby because of persistent stigma If a law was passed to restrict only certified crazy people from owning guns I would hope someone would say it was morally wrong But I m afraid that s not a position either a liberal or conservative politician is willing to rant and stomp their feet about Am I going to find out some day that no one will come over to our house to play with my daughter because I m listed in a national registry of certified crazy people as Bipolar Ella October 8 2015 Reply I think the fallacy of division is here too in what you write What s important to remember it that we who live with and manage mental illness everyday know too that it is we that also often have a far better understanding of our emotions and behavior We habitually take control of our actions We reflect upon our choices And we use coping skills in ways sometimes better and with more personal responsibility than those without a diagnosis Because YOU manage your illness and take control of your actions while YOU reflect on choices instead of acting on impulse and while YOU cope in ways that show personal responsibility IMO you write as though this is the case with all people who have mental illness But this is not the reality of everyone with a mental illness There are cases where the person and or their loved ones are in denial that they are ill and

    Original URL path: http://www.bphope.com/blog/tragedy-mental-health-logic/ (2016-02-14)
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