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  • 10 Obscure Articles of Clothing | Britannica.com
    times especially in weddingwear and alternative fashion Corsetlike garments can be traced all the way back to Minoan civilization in the Bronze Age but corsets as we know them didn t come into fashion until about the 15th century They have since gone through many iterations Although you may already see corsets at special occasions they could still be useful in everyday life Skip the diet pills and just have someone lace you up really tight 6 Commode Courtesy of the Pierpont Morgan Library New York City You may only know the word commode as a euphemism for toilet Clearly it s time to bring back the commode of the late 15th and early 16th centuries a formidable hairpiece made of wire framework that was covered in ribbon starched linen and lace The finished product was known in France as a frontange or tower Forget hair extensions and teased up Jersey Shore style hair just go full on tower 5 Tippet Courtesy of the Victoria and Albert Museum London Tippet has actually meant several different things in the fashion world including the long black scarf still worn by some clergymen But the best tippet in my humble opinion and the one that deserves a comeback is the long narrow cloth streamer worn as an armband above the elbow in the late 14th century These streamers hung gracefully to the knee or even to the ground Imagine how nice they would look flowing in the wind behind a bicycle While not very functional the tippet could dress up any outfit 4 Cockade Rijksmuseum RP P 2009 1661A Cockades were knots or bows of ribbon that were usually worn pinned to hats They came into fashion in the 18th century originally just as decoration Later they were used to show affiliation with a group such as a political party or military unit especially during the French Revolution How great would it be if gang members sported ribboned hats instead of tattoos 3 Bustle Courtesy of The Brooklyn Museum gift of Mrs Lillian Glenn Pierce Mrs Mabel Glenn Cooper Mrs Victor L Pierce The bustle is an age old antidote for having insufficient junk in the trunk This posterior padding fashionable in the late 1800s was worn over the back of the hips to shape the skirt Bustles could be made in a variety of ways some were shaped metal or mesh while others were just fabric padded with straw or horsehair Eventually they were made as wire cages that attached to petticoats While you may sometimes still see bustles on brides the look is usually achieved by simply draping and tying layers of fabric But the bustle itself really deserves a second glance and not just for its dramatic bum enhancing effect A padded cushion tied around your waist all day could double as a lovely portable lumbar support no 2 Ruff Courtesy of the Art Gallery of Ontario Toronto The ruff was a type of ruffled collar popular in Europe in

    Original URL path: http://www.britannica.com/list/10-obscure-articles-of-clothing (2016-02-13)
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  • 7 Puzzling Plane Disappearances | Britannica.com
    five planes lost communication with the ground station However the ground station could still follow communications between the pilots of the planes during which it was noted that they became disoriented as to their locations and decided that once the first plane dropped below 10 gallons of fuel all planes were to ditch to the sea An intensive rescue mission ensued immediately by the Coast Guard and navy that covered 700 000 square kilometers over five days during which another plane carrying 13 passengers disappeared never to be found again The only clue as to its fate was a report from an ocean liner that was in the supposed location of the plane at that specific time claiming to have seen a giant fireball in the sky However to the date of this publication no debris of the six missing planes or their passengers has been found thus sparking the mysterious aura surrounding the legendary Bermuda Triangle 3 Glenn Miller over the English Channel Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images By mid December of 1944 Glenn Miller had already secured his place in world history as one of the greatest big band leaders and as a true innovator of the swing genre However when the plane he boarded was never seen again after its takeoff his status grew to that of an American legend As the plane which was headed to Paris from London departed on a cold foggy day and no other apparent conclusions could be drawn the official report of the missing plane ruled that it must have crashed into the English Channel as a result of iced over wings or engine complications However that ambiguous ruling failed to mollify a distraught population that had just lost one of the greatest morale boosters of the Allied Powers Naturally gossip ensued about what had really happened Theories were espoused ranging from the famed musician secretly landing only to die in a hospital from cancer only days later to the plane being accidentally bombed by friendly fire from English planes jettisoning bombs that were originally intended for an aborted mission none of which have been satisfactorily verified All that is known with certainty is that the plane left for its seemingly short trip on December 15 and never arrived at its intended destination 2 British South American Airways Star Tiger Tony Arruza Bruce Coleman Inc On January 30 1948 a British South American Airways Avro Tudor IV plane named Star Tiger took off from Azores archipelago in order to complete the last leg of a flight from London to Bermuda Prior to takeoff it was noted that the plane had endured problems with a heater as well as a malfunctioning compass However the plane continued on its schedule behind a Lancastrian plane that served as a lookout for signs of tempestuous weather So to keep the plane at a warmer temperature it flew extremely low at 2 000 feet thus eliminating virtually any sort of wiggle room if a problem should

    Original URL path: http://www.britannica.com/list/7-puzzling-plane-disappearances (2016-02-13)
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  • 6 Lady Pirates | Britannica.com
    most successful one Little is known of her early life except that she was a prostitute but in 1801 she was captured by and subsequently became the wife of a pirate named Cheng Yi Together they sailed the seas and amassed a pirate army known as the Red Flag Fleet Upon Cheng Yi s death in 1807 Ching Shih took command of the fleet which consisted of hundreds of ships and some 50 000 pirates She kept them in line with a strict code of conduct with most offenses being punished by beheading The fleet proved so unstoppable sometimes even venturing upstream in smaller boats to hit cities and towns that weren t on the coast that the admiral of the Chinese navy committed suicide rather than be captured by her In the end she was offered amnesty by the Chinese government and retired to the countryside with her loot 3 Anne Bonny The Print Collector Heritage Images Anne Bonny was a trailblazer She was born née Anne Cormac in Ireland but emigrated with her family to what would later become the United States as a teenager She married a sailor John Bonny against her father s wishes and sailed off with him into the figurative sunset When her marriage turned sour she took up with the infamous pirate John Calico Jack Rackham Together they commandeered a ship and began pillaging along the coast of Jamaica Although women were considered bad luck aboard ship Anne did little to conceal her gender unlike crewmate Mary Read more about her next In 1720 Rackham and his crew were captured The male crew members were hung for piracy but Bonny and Read got stays of execution in the way only women can pregnancy Bonny was later released and lived the remainder of her life in a quieter fashion 2 Mary Read The Print Collector Heritage Images Mary Read was born an illegitimate daughter but raised as a legitimate son Her half brother born to their mother shortly after her husband died at sea was to be taken care of by his grandmother until he was grown When he died Mary s mother quickly became pregnant with Mary and after her birth attempted to pass her off as the dead son The grandmother got wise however and that was the end of that scheme Mary s mother continued to dress her as a boy however to hire her out as household help She worked on ships and even joined the army as a man While sailing on a Dutch ship Mary was captured by Calico Jack Rackham and his crew She soon became friends with Anne Bonny Rackham s lover who had discovered her secret They pillaged and plundered with the best of them but it wasn t to last Upon their eventual capture both pleaded pregnant and escaped execution but Mary died in jail 1 Rachel Wall Wikinade Rachel Wall née Schmidt is thought to be the first American female pirate born in

    Original URL path: http://www.britannica.com/list/6-lady-pirates (2016-02-13)
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  • 9 U.S. Presidents with the Most Vetoes | Britannica.com
    to Teddy being immortalized in the Mount Rushmore sculpture of South Dakota 5 Ulysses S Grant 93 Library of Congress Washington D C Although corruptions committed by those around him have cast a dark shadow over his eight year term 1869 77 as president the celebrated general of the Union army during the Civil War did in fact have some brighter moments in the Oval Office one of which can be found in his unprecedented up to that time 93 vetoes 45 regular 48 pocket 4 overridden In the face of a devastating economic depression that started in 1873 Congress sought to add more greenbacks to the American circulation thus increasing the amount of legal tender available to the suffering American population However Grant who was arguably influenced by some of his advisors as well as by his wife struck down the so called Inflation Bill an action that many historians have claimed to diminish the severity of the ensuing currency crisis of the following quarter century 4 Dwight D Eisenhower 181 Fabian Bachrach After winning over Americans hearts with his successes in World War II Eisenhower retired from the military after 37 years of experience and sought election to the White House where he was elected to two terms of service 1953 61 Being the first president to have to deal with three Congresses controlled by the opposite party Eisenhower learned quickly the importance of the veto namely in the final years of his presidency when Congress began to spend what he saw as excessively on domestic issues Of his 181 vetoes 73 regular 108 pocket 2 overridden one significant veto denied an extension to the Federal Pollution Control Act a bill he previously signed into law which would have allotted more funds to wastewater treatment He claimed that water pollution was a uniquely local blight leaving the burden to the states as he favored a smaller federal government A similar piece of legislation was later passed under the Kennedy administration 3 Harry S Truman 250 Courtesy of the U S Signal Corps Thrust into the presidency 1945 53 during the Second World War after only an 82 day term as vice president during which he had only met with President Roosevelt twice Harry Truman did his damnedest to retain American superiority in the embers of the war torn world as the emerging Soviet superpower challenged with its spread of communism During his first elected term Truman was forced to combat an anti New Deal Republican led Congress with a total of 250 vetoes 180 regular 70 pocket 12 overridden He continually vetoed proposed tax cuts that he believed heavily favored the wealthy while the nation was on the brink of an inflation crisis However he did not always win against Congress Notably in 1947 Congress overturned one of his vetoes in order to pass the Taft Hartley Act which severely restricted organized labor in a number of ways and in 1950 Congress in response to the growing fear

    Original URL path: http://www.britannica.com/list/9-us-presidents-with-the-most-vetoes (2016-02-13)
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  • An Encyclopedia of Sports Quiz | Britannica.com
    your score When you re done try again to beat your best score vm state secondsLeft fixedLength 2 QUESTION vm state currentQuestion 1 of vm questions length Timer Score vm state score An Encyclopedia of Sports vm state secondsLeft fixedLength 2 QUESTION vm state currentQuestion 1 of vm questions length Timer Score vm state score An Encyclopedia of Sports 0 vm state nextLabel Quiz Results An Encyclopedia of Sports vm state numberCorrect vm questions length correct vm state score vm maxPoints points Replay Share your score Log in to save your score Sports Recreation Sports Authority Fact or Fiction Animals Elephants Fact or Fiction Philosophy Religion Confucianism Geography Geography Randomizer Literature Language World Languages Are you a Quizmaster Log in to save your score and compete against the community Compare your score Max Score vm maxPoints New Best Score vm state score vm communityAverage number 0 Your Score Community Average High scores Your results vm state responsesVisible Hide Show Answers Questions Correct vm state numberCorrect vm questions length Total Score vm state score vm maxPoints Question Question index 1 Your Answer No response vm state responses index isCorrect Your Correct Answer Back to Top History Historical USA Technology Computers and

    Original URL path: http://www.britannica.com/quiz/an-encyclopedia-of-sports (2016-02-13)
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  • Music Fact or Fiction Quiz | Britannica.com
    When you re done try again to beat your best score vm state secondsLeft fixedLength 2 QUESTION vm state currentQuestion 1 of vm questions length Timer Score vm state score Music Fact or Fiction vm state secondsLeft fixedLength 2 QUESTION vm state currentQuestion 1 of vm questions length Timer Score vm state score Music Fact or Fiction 0 vm state nextLabel Quiz Results Music Fact or Fiction vm state numberCorrect vm questions length correct vm state score vm maxPoints points Replay Share your score Log in to save your score Music A Music Lesson Arts Culture Clowning Around History History 101 Fact or Fiction Geography Exploring South Africa Fact or Fiction Philosophy Religion This or That Greek Gods vs Roman Gods Are you a Quizmaster Log in to save your score and compete against the community Compare your score Max Score vm maxPoints New Best Score vm state score vm communityAverage number 0 Your Score Community Average High scores Your results vm state responsesVisible Hide Show Answers Questions Correct vm state numberCorrect vm questions length Total Score vm state score vm maxPoints Question Question index 1 Your Answer No response vm state responses index isCorrect Your Correct Answer Back to

    Original URL path: http://www.britannica.com/quiz/music-fact-or-fiction (2016-02-13)
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  • Character Profile Quiz | Britannica.com
    When you re done try again to beat your best score vm state secondsLeft fixedLength 2 QUESTION vm state currentQuestion 1 of vm questions length Timer Score vm state score Character Profile vm state secondsLeft fixedLength 2 QUESTION vm state currentQuestion 1 of vm questions length Timer Score vm state score Character Profile 0 vm state nextLabel Quiz Results Character Profile vm state numberCorrect vm questions length correct vm state score vm maxPoints points Replay Share your score Log in to save your score Peanuts Fact or Fiction Pop Culture Peanuts Fact or Fiction Food Top Banana Fact or Fiction Music Musical Instruments Animals Bear in Mind Fact or Fiction History Nautical Exploration and Aviation Fact or Fiction Are you a Quizmaster Log in to save your score and compete against the community Compare your score Max Score vm maxPoints New Best Score vm state score vm communityAverage number 0 Your Score Community Average High scores Your results vm state responsesVisible Hide Show Answers Questions Correct vm state numberCorrect vm questions length Total Score vm state score vm maxPoints Question Question index 1 Your Answer No response vm state responses index isCorrect Your Correct Answer Back to Top Technology Computers

    Original URL path: http://www.britannica.com/quiz/character-profile (2016-02-13)
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  • Nuts, Seeds, and Legumes: Fact or Fiction Quiz | Britannica.com
    When you re done try again to beat your best score vm state secondsLeft fixedLength 2 QUESTION vm state currentQuestion 1 of vm questions length Timer Score vm state score Nuts Seeds and Legumes Fact or Fiction vm state secondsLeft fixedLength 2 QUESTION vm state currentQuestion 1 of vm questions length Timer Score vm state score Nuts Seeds and Legumes Fact or Fiction 0 vm state nextLabel Quiz Results Nuts Seeds and Legumes Fact or Fiction vm state numberCorrect vm questions length correct vm state score vm maxPoints points Replay Share your score Log in to save your score Food Say Cheese Sports Recreation The Olympic Games Music Prismatic Playlist Volume 1 Geography Australia Fact or Fiction Animals Felines Fact or Fiction Are you a Quizmaster Log in to save your score and compete against the community Compare your score Max Score vm maxPoints New Best Score vm state score vm communityAverage number 0 Your Score Community Average High scores Your results vm state responsesVisible Hide Show Answers Questions Correct vm state numberCorrect vm questions length Total Score vm state score vm maxPoints Question Question index 1 Your Answer No response vm state responses index isCorrect Your Correct Answer Back

    Original URL path: http://www.britannica.com/quiz/nuts-seeds-and-legumes-fact-or-fiction (2016-02-13)
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