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  • Yamanashi | prefecture, Japan | Britannica.com
    Aichi Shizuoka Hida Range Nagano Toyama Fukui Gifu Niigata Ishikawa Asia Tokyo Yokohama Metropolitan Area Fukushima Keep exploring Hit the Road Quiz Get to Know Asia World Tour 9 Fun Facts About Sleep Nutritional Powerhouses 8 Foods That Pack a Nutritional Punch What made you want to look up Yamanashi To From Subject Comments Please limit to 900 characters Cancel FEATURED QUIZZES Vocabulary Quiz True or False Spell It See More Quizzes MORE QUIZZES Peachy Keen Fact or Fiction Exploring Human Bones Fact or Fiction In Good Taste See More Quizzes About Us About Our Ads Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms of Use 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Inc MLA style Yamanashi Encyclopædia Britannica Encyclopædia Britannica Online Encyclopædia Britannica Inc 2016 Web 12 Feb 2016 http www britannica com place Yamanashi APA style Yamanashi 2016 In Encyclopædia Britannica Retrieved from http www britannica com place Yamanashi Harvard style Yamanashi 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Online Retrieved 12 February 2016 from http www britannica com place Yamanashi Chicago Manual of Style Encyclopædia Britannica Online s v Yamanashi accessed February 12 2016 http www britannica com place Yamanashi While every effort has been made to follow citation style rules there may be some discrepancies Please refer to the appropriate style manual or other sources if you have any questions Update Link Click anywhere inside the article to add text or insert superscripts subscripts and special characters You can also highlight a section and use the tools in this bar to modify existing content Add links to related Britannica articles You can double click any word or highlight a word or phrase in the text below and then select an article from the search box Or simply highlight a word or phrase in the article then enter the article name or term you d like to link

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  • Shizuoka | prefecture, Japan | Britannica.com
    the prefecture including Hamamatsu and Shizuoka lie along the line they were important post stations along the historic route The prefecture s more rugged northern interior is much less populated than the coastal zone The Izu Peninsula is one of Japan s premier tourist centres with the hot spring spas at Atami Itō and Shuzenji being especially popular Portions of Minami Alps and Fuji Hakone Izu national parks are located respectively in northern and northeastern Shizuoka both of which are also popular tourist destinations The port of Shimoda on the southeast coast of the peninsula received the ships of Commodore Matthew C Perry of the United States in 1854 and was one of the first Japanese ports to be opened to trade with the United States Other historic sites in the prefecture include Toro an excavated prehistoric village from the late Yayoi period c 100 250 ce outside Shizuoka city The shrine at Mount Kunō near Toro was the first burial place of Tokugawa Ieyasu 1543 1616 the first Tokugawa shogun whose remains were subsequently moved to Nikkō Tochigi prefecture in 1617 Shizuoka prefecture is home to a number of institutions of higher education including the University of Shizuoka established 1986 in Shizuoka city Hamamatsu University School of Medicine 1974 in Hamamatsu and Shizuoka University 1949 with campuses in both cities Area 3 003 square miles 7 779 square km Pop 2010 3 765 007 Comments Share Email Print Cite You may also be interested in Japan Emperors and Empresses Regnant of Japan list of prime ministers of Japan Asia Aichi Hida Range Yamanashi Nagano Fukui Toyama Niigata Gifu Keep exploring Hit the Road Quiz Get to Know Asia World Tour 7 Scary Surgical Instruments Then and Now Food for Thought The Origins of 6 Favorite Foods What made you want to look up Shizuoka To From Subject Comments Please limit to 900 characters Cancel Britannica Stories Behind The News Philosophy Religion Healing the Schism Pope Meets Patriarch Behind The News Science Gravitational Waves Observed Spotlight History Thomas Malthus s 250th Birthday See More Stories FEATURED QUIZZES Vocabulary Quiz True or False Spell It See More Quizzes About Us About Our Ads Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms of Use 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Inc MLA style Shizuoka Encyclopædia Britannica Encyclopædia Britannica Online Encyclopædia Britannica Inc 2016 Web 12 Feb 2016 http www britannica com place Shizuoka prefecture Japan APA style Shizuoka 2016 In Encyclopædia Britannica Retrieved from http www britannica com place Shizuoka prefecture Japan Harvard style Shizuoka 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Online Retrieved 12 February 2016 from http www britannica com place Shizuoka prefecture Japan Chicago Manual of Style Encyclopædia Britannica Online s v Shizuoka accessed February 12 2016 http www britannica com place Shizuoka prefecture Japan While every effort has been made to follow citation style rules there may be some discrepancies Please refer to the appropriate style manual or other sources if you have any questions Update Link Click anywhere inside the article to add text or insert superscripts

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  • Honshu | island, Japan | Britannica.com
    Mie Hokuriku Kyushu Hokkaido Keep exploring Hit the Road Quiz It s All in the Name World Tour 12 Peculiar Phobias 6 Common Infections We Wish Never Existed What made you want to look up Honshu To From Subject Comments Please limit to 900 characters Cancel FEATURED QUIZZES Vocabulary Quiz True or False Spell It See More Quizzes MORE QUIZZES Exploring Human Bones Fact or Fiction A World of Food Sports Enthusiast See More Quizzes About Us About Our Ads Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms of Use 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Inc MLA style Honshu Encyclopædia Britannica Encyclopædia Britannica Online Encyclopædia Britannica Inc 2016 Web 12 Feb 2016 http www britannica com place Honshu APA style Honshu 2016 In Encyclopædia Britannica Retrieved from http www britannica com place Honshu Harvard style Honshu 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Online Retrieved 12 February 2016 from http www britannica com place Honshu Chicago Manual of Style Encyclopædia Britannica Online s v Honshu accessed February 12 2016 http www britannica com place Honshu While every effort has been made to follow citation style rules there may be some discrepancies Please refer to the appropriate style manual or other sources if you have any questions Update Link Click anywhere inside the article to add text or insert superscripts subscripts and special characters You can also highlight a section and use the tools in this bar to modify existing content Add links to related Britannica articles You can double click any word or highlight a word or phrase in the text below and then select an article from the search box Or simply highlight a word or phrase in the article then enter the article name or term you d like to link to in the search box below and select from the list of results Note we do

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  • Tokyo-Yokohama Metropolitan Area | Japan | Britannica.com
    the palace has been the bureaucratic centre of the city since shortly after it became the imperial capital Located there and in neighbouring districts to the west are the main offices of the national government including the National Diet Building and the prime minister s residence Tokyo railway system Contunico ZDF Enterprises GmbH Mainz For the rest of Tokyo there has been a huge proliferation of what are called satellite centres the largest of them every bit as deserving of the name city as are Kawasaki and Chiba Shinjuku is the largest and is the main retail and entertainment district in the city and in the land More people pass through Shinjuku railway station on their way from and to home in the sprawling western suburbs than through any other station in Japan and quite possibly in the world Second and perhaps catching up because of its popularity among teenagers is Shibuya to the south and third is Ikebukuro to the north All three lie along the western arc of the Yamanote Line the railway that circles much of the main part of the city They bespeak the general tendency of the city to move westward There are others such as Ueno a short distance west of the Sumida and Nakano west of Shinjuku and to the number might be added central Yokohama even though Yokohama is a separate city and not a satellite centre Its traditional role as the port for greater Tokyo having declined it is asserting its independence as a hub for shopping conventions and the like The beautification of the nondescript waterfront has been a conspicuous success Though Chinese are numerous in such Tokyo centres as Shinjuku Yokohama is alone among them in having a genuine and vibrant Chinatown Street patterns Despite disasters and modernization the street pattern of central Tokyo resembles that of Edo Old streets have been widened and new streets cut through but after both of its great modern disasters in 1923 and 1945 the city pulled itself together in much the same shape that it had had before The old centre of the city is essentially a cobweb with the palace grounds at its centre reflecting the defensive arrangement of the castle town The old flatlands to the east are in a grid pattern with the grids not ideally joining one another One might expect the plan of a city to become more rational as it expands and planners start exerting themselves This has not been true of Tokyo and still less is it true of the suburbs that lie beyond the prefectural boundaries There really is no plan and no pattern except in a rudimentary sense the old cobweb Streets wander along valleys and ridges and one can often sense in them what the disorder of the old paddy fields must have been The cobweb survives in main arteries that radiate out from the centre leaving the old city through post stations called the Five Mouths The most important of these was Shinagawa to the south first of the 53 stages on the Tōkaidō the main coastal road to Kyōto celebrated in the woodblock prints of Hiroshige and others It is still situated on the oldest and most important highway to Yokohama and beyond The old highway to the mountainous province of Kai modern Yamanashi prefecture passes through Shinjuku directly west of the palace To the northwest not as important as it once was is Itabashi through which passes the old inland road to Kyōto More than one highway departed for the north through Senjū which had two of the Five Mouths Most of Yokohama is like the western part of Tokyo which is to say confusing more consistently confusing even than Tokyo Motorists defeated by its random streets have been known to descend from their automobiles and look for the North Star though the air is seldom clear enough to reveal it The city is for the most part hilly and confronted with a hill a Japanese road or street tends to wander off in search of a detour Only a limited band to the south and west of the original Yokohama railway terminus now Sakuragi chō station and the harbour area are in something like a grid pattern One looks in vain for traces of the old Kanagawa post station in Yokohama and is similarly frustrated with regard to the one that was in Kawasaki farther north toward Tokyo Probably because it lost its castle some centuries ago Chiba wears the aspect of a medieval castle town less than does Tokyo a visitor to the city has to be told where the castle was Green space Mists natural and man made so pile upon one another in the Tokyo skies that the view from one of the Shinjuku skyscrapers is not likely on an average day to go very far When it does one may be surprised at the amount of greenery Ōsaka is an ashen city by comparison and even Kyōto the ancient capital is wanting in the wide and beautiful parks that are scattered throughout Tokyo The cemeteries are also wide verdant and beautiful Grave viewing can be a satisfying pastime The traditional pattern for viewing the flowers and grasses of the seasons has shown remarkable powers of survival The famous places of Edo were mostly in the northern and eastern districts and they are so situated in Tokyo as well In spite of disasters and crowding the flatlands and the hills along their immediate fringes are still where the blossom viewing crowds gather In this phenomenon may be found indeed the only regard in which the old Low City has held its own against the growing cultural hegemony of the High City There are famous new places to be sure such as the iris gardens of the Meiji Shrine said to have been designed by the Meiji emperor himself and such blossoms as the camellia and the chrysanthemum are to be seen everywhere For the first in the annual procession of important blossoms the plum most people go to the Yushima Shrine near Ueno Park Ueno Park itself along with the Sumida embankment was the most famous place in Edo for cherry blossoms It remains the most famous of Tokyo as well Ueno also contains a renowned peony garden Probably the most famous of peony gardens is at Nishiarai Daishi temple north of the Ara River The best known azalea garden is at the Nezu Shrine just north of the University of Tokyo For wisteria one can do no better than the Kameido shrine in the eastern suburbs until 1932 As beautiful as the iris garden at the Meiji Shrine are those at Horikiri and Mizumoto in the eastern part of the city For the lotuses of full summer it is Ueno again Then come chrysanthemums and autumn foliage the latter best viewed in the mountains The parks of Yokohama are newer than those of Tokyo but there are fine ones The most popular Yamashita is on land reclaimed from the bay with debris from the 1923 earthquake The Sankei Garden some distance south of the city centre was built and presented to the city by a 19th century silk merchant The park once reposed by the bay but reclamation has put it inland some distance and in some measure lessened its beauty It contains a collection of fine old buildings moved from elsewhere The lands between Sakuragi chō and the harbour were once grim docks and warehouses Now they are like a field of densely blooming wildflowers the impression of wildness being carefully cultivated Building styles Shiodome City Centre Lombroso Tamed nature in parks gardens temples and cemeteries aside it cannot be said that Tokyo is a beautiful city Physically it is among the newest cities in the world almost nothing is as much as a century old Disaster helps explain this fact but it is not the only reason Traditionally the Japanese have not built for durability Buildings are torn down at a rate that would be remarkable in most places and is next to unbelievable in a country that thinks itself strapped for resources So almost everything is new and rebuilding seems to result inevitably in something less distinguished than what was replaced The view from a moderately high window will most commonly look out on several dozens of buildings all of which are in unimaginative modern styles Tokyo earthquake prediction Contunico ZDF Enterprises GmbH Mainz Skyscrapers are a relatively recent phenomenon dating only from the completion 1968 of the 36 story Kasumigaseki Building just south of the government ministries Until then aesthetic and engineering considerations had kept buildings to a maximum of about 10 stories but there soon blossomed a number of high rise structures all purported by their builders to be earthquake resistant The largest cluster of skyscrapers rises to the west of Shinjuku station although Yokohama boasts the tallest building in Japan the 70 story Landmark Tower completed in 1993 Surviving pockets of wooden structures from perhaps the turn of the 20th century as well as the xylographic art of Edo tell us that Tokyo must once have been a very pleasing city in the severe monochrome manner held by many to be peculiarly Japanese The pockets will soon go to be replaced by cheaper perhaps more comfortable certainly uglier modern things The city still contains a scattering of buildings in premodern European styles including a rather fine Queen Anne building in the Kasumigaseki bureaucratic quarter but cracker box modern has been overwhelmingly favoured since World War II To let these facts prey on one s mind is to overlook a very important point that an ugly face can also be a very animated and endearing face The people cherry cherry blossom viewing The Stock Market Ben Simmons The most striking fact about the population of Greater Tokyo is that it is so large The four prefectures of the metropolitan area contain one fourth of all the people in Japan The population of the 23 wards of Tokyo is stabilized at roughly eight million while that of outlying regions continues to grow rapidly Two other cities within the complex Yokohama and Kawasaki have populations of more than a million The average age for Tokyoites is well under that for the rest of the nation It is a city of young people and they flood the streets Though the very young are a little afraid of Shinjuku and its gangs the streets on the whole are safe So Tokyo is filled with young people nudging past one another not in automobiles but on sidewalks in this regard not many cities can be its equal It conveys a sense of irresistible vitality It may be quiet and unpeopled in the hours before and after dawn but at other hours none of the bustling centres is without its crowds Ordinary neighbourhoods are quieter than they once were because more people are indoors watching television notably baseball the national sport during the season Nonetheless the pedestrian crowds continue to be far more widely diffused than in any American city The origins of the Tokyo populace are mostly in the northern and eastern parts of the country Japan s other great megalopolis centred upon Ōsaka draws from the south and west It is reasonable to ask why masses of people continue to pour in who know full well how crowded it already is and how trying it can be especially for the newcomer It is dangerous to generalize about national traits but one may hazard a simple answer the Japanese love to be where everyone is and there are nearly as many people in one conurbation or the other as everywhere else in Japan put together Although Yokohama has passed Ōsaka in population the latter is still considered Japan s second city Ōsaka is the focal point of its conurbation while Yokohama is largely a bedroom town for Tokyo Yokohama retains its international flavour from the days when it was Japan s chief entrepôt with the West even though its foreign community is much smaller than it once was Tokyo in spite of a substantial foreign population and its world class status has considerably less of a cosmopolitan feel than a city such as New York The economy Industry Akihabara The Stock Market Ben Simmons Since the war Tokyo has taken over from Ōsaka the role of leading industrial centre in the country The region has a highly diversified manufacturing base Heavy industries such as metals chemicals machinery transportation equipment and oil refining are concentrated in Chiba Kawasaki and Yokohama Tokyo proper is strongly inclined toward light industry Most of Japan s books and much of its electronic equipment for instance are produced there Commerce and finance Shibuya Spectrum Colour Library Heritage Images More noteworthy than the concentration of industry is the concentration of management and finance in and near Tokyo Even companies with factories elsewhere maintain large offices in Tokyo and the proper corporate location is Marunouchi There is a good reason for keeping a Tokyo office proximity to government offices although a chumminess between managers and bureaucrats is thought by many to be not entirely healthy Finance has been more conservative geographically than has management with Nihombashi the commercial and financial centre of Edo as its main seat Located there are the Bank of Japan and the Tokyo Stock Exchange Japan s two most important financial institutions The latter is much busier than the Ōsaka Stock Exchange but this may be somewhat misleading a very large proportion of stocks are in intercompany holdings that do not go on the market This arrangement is a defense against hostile takeovers and also a continuing assurance of cooperation among the members of the giant conglomerates but it makes the stock market easily manipulatable and less than ideally subject to market forces During the 1980s as Japan was emerging as an economic superpower Tokyo suddenly found itself a global financial centre This remarkable growth rate came to be called the bubble economy The expression refers to speculation in general but most particularly to land speculation and to Tokyo where land prices have been the most outrageously exorbitant in the country By the early 1990s however overinflated stock and land prices led to a bursting of the bubble so curious a phenomenon that the Japanese grasp of the word bubble seems in doubt The English word is most commonly used and when it is put into Japanese awa the rendition is foam rather than bubble What has happened does seem more like a subsidence of foam than a thorough burst of a bubble Transportation Rainbow Bridge Tokyo AbleStock com Jupiterimages The emergence of modern Tokyo came at the beginning of the transportation revolution of the late 19th century The first railroad in Japan was put through from Tokyo to Yokohama in 1872 The city continues to be the most important transportation centre in the country The busiest rail stations are those accommodating commuters to the western suburbs but the traveler who wishes to go considerable distances by rail usually leaves from Tokyo station in Marunouchi or Ueno station a couple of miles to the north Only since 1991 has it been possible to take a Shinkansen express train to northern Japan from Tokyo station as Ueno was the traditional terminus for northbound travel Most international travel is through the highly inconvenient airport at Narita in Chiba prefecture at least an hour by rail from central Tokyo Opened in 1978 the facility has been at the centre of controversy since its inception mainly because of opposition by landowners to the appropriation of their property The older smaller and rather more convenient airport at Haneda near the Tama River accommodates domestic travel and a few international flights Yokohama still is the most important port in the region the other major ports being Chiba Kawasaki and Tokyo Tokyo s streets are flooded not only with people but also with vehicles and traffic can become almost gridlocked at busy times and in busy places There is a good system of roads and express highways in the city and region but it is woefully inadequate for the crush of traffic A splendid network of subways and commuter rail lines provides an alternative to the automobile Administration and social conditions Government The two most populous prefectures of Japan Tokyo and Ōsaka are the two smallest in area Though somewhat larger than Ōsaka Tokyo occupies roughly a third of the premodern province of Musashi the remainder of which is in Saitama prefecture Tokyo and Ōsaka were two of the three urban prefectures fu established in 1872 the third being Kyōto The thinking seems to have been that the two should be just that metropolitan complexes each essentially a city and its suburbs and the smaller they were the more easily they could be controlled Kyōto which was not expected to grow like the other two and did not was not so treated The expansion of the city in 1932 made the city limits coincide with the prefectural boundaries in all directions but the west where lay the county part of the prefecture as distinguished from the ward part The amalgamation of city and prefecture and establishment of the metropolitan prefecture in 1943 made the largest municipality in the land the only one without a mayor The county part now consists largely of incorporated cities all of which have mayors Legislative authority in the metropolis rests with the Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly consisting of 127 members elected to 4 year terms The principal elected official is the prefectural governor who has authority over a number of administrative commissions and commissioners including the fire department and those for public works Each of the 23 wards has a popularly elected council and ward head with limited authority over local matters Services Edo had a sophisticated though inadequate system of aqueducts Three principal ones brought water from the highlands to

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  • volcano | geology | Britannica.com
    ash and lava Mount Fuji is a classic stratovolcano Iceland provides fine examples of volcanic plateaus while the seafloor around Iceland provides excellent examples of submarine volcanic structures plate boundary relation to volcanoes Encyclopædia Britannica Inc Volcanoes figure prominently in the mythology of many peoples who have learned to live with eruptions but science was late in recognizing the important role of volcanism in the evolution of the Earth As late as 1768 the first edition of Encyclopædia Britannica gave voice to a common misconception by defining volcanoes as burning mountains which probably are made up of sulphur and some other matter proper to ferment with it and take fire Today geologists agree that volcanism is a profound process resulting from the thermal evolution of planetary bodies Heat does not easily escape from large bodies such as the Earth by the processes of conduction or radiation Instead heat is transferred from the Earth s interior largely by convection that is the partial melting of the Earth s crust and mantle and the buoyant rise of magma to the surface Volcanoes are the surface sign of this thermal process Their roots reach deep inside the Earth and their fruits are hurled high into the atmosphere thermal field active thermal fields in the past 10 000 years Encyclopædia Britannica Inc Volcanoes are closely associated with plate tectonic activity Most volcanoes such as those of Japan and Iceland occur on the margins of the enormous solid rocky plates that make up the Earth s surface Other volcanoes such as those of the Hawaiian Islands occur in the middle of a plate providing important evidence as to the direction and rate of plate motion The study of volcanoes and their products is known as volcanology but these phenomena are not the realm of any single scientific discipline Rather they are studied by many scientists from several specialties geophysicists and geochemists who probe the deep roots of volcanoes and monitor signs of future eruptions geologists who decipher prehistoric volcanic activity and infer the likely nature of future eruptions biologists who learn how plants and animals colonize recently erupted volcanic rocks and meteorologists who determine the effects of volcanic dust and gases on the atmosphere weather and climate sensor Mount Saint Helens US Geological Survey Clearly the destructive potential of volcanoes is tremendous But the risk to people living nearby can be reduced significantly by assessing volcanic hazards monitoring volcanic activity and forecasting eruptions and instituting procedures for evacuating populations In addition volcanism affects humankind in beneficial ways Volcanism provides beautiful scenery fertile soils valuable mineral deposits and geothermal energy Over geologic time volcanoes recycle the Earth s hydrosphere and atmosphere Volcanic eruptions Images Videos quizzes Lists 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 13 Next Page Comments Share Email Print Cite Last Updated 12 9 2015 You may also be interested in hot spring mud volcano fumarole island arc seamount caldera cinder cone deep sea vent guyot mofette solfatara volcanology Keep exploring Mountains

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  • UNESCO | international organization | Britannica.com
    cultural heritage For example in the 1960s UNESCO helped sponsor efforts to save ancient Egyptian monuments from the waters of the Aswan High Dam and in 1972 it sponsored an international agreement to establish a World Heritage List of cultural sites and natural areas that would enjoy government protection In the 1980s a controversial study by UNESCO s International Commission for the Study of Communication Problems headed by the Irish statesman and Nobel Peace laureate Seán MacBride proposed a New World Information and Communication Order that would treat communication and freedom of information as basic human rights and seek to eliminate the gap in communications capabilities between developing and developed countries Each member state has one vote in UNESCO s General Conference which meets every two years to set the agency s budget its program of activities and the scale of contributions made by member states to the agency The 58 member Executive Board which is elected by the General Conference generally meets twice each year to give advice and direction to the agency s work The Secretariat is the agency s backbone and is headed by a director general appointed by the General Conference for a six year term National commissions composed of local experts have been set up by about 180 UNESCO members and serve as governmental advisory bodies in their respective states Most work occurs in special commissions and committees convened with expert participation Prominent examples include the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission 1961 the World Commission on Culture and Development 1992 99 and the World Commission on the Ethics of Scientific Knowledge and Technology 1998 The findings of these commissions are regularly published by UNESCO Karen Mingst Comments Share Email Print Cite You may also be interested in Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees UNHCR UNICEF United Nations Environment Programme UNEP United Nations UN World Health Organization WHO United Nations Security Council International Labour Organization ILO International Maritime Organization IMO Food and Agriculture Organization FAO United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East UNRWA International Finance Corporation IFC International Telecommunication Union ITU Keep exploring Paris at Random Science Quiz Science Fact or Fiction 6 Fictional Languages You Can Really Learn 7 One Hit Wonders That Kept Us Wondering What made you want to look up UNESCO To From Subject Comments Please limit to 900 characters Cancel Britannica Stories Behind The News Philosophy Religion Healing the Schism Pope Meets Patriarch Behind The News Science Gravitational Waves Observed Spotlight History Thomas Malthus s 250th Birthday See More Stories FEATURED QUIZZES Vocabulary Quiz True or False Spell It See More Quizzes About Us About Our Ads Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms of Use 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Inc MLA style UNESCO Encyclopædia Britannica Encyclopædia Britannica Online Encyclopædia Britannica Inc 2016 Web 12 Feb 2016 http www britannica com topic UNESCO APA style UNESCO 2016 In Encyclopædia Britannica Retrieved from http www britannica com topic UNESCO Harvard style UNESCO 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Online Retrieved 12

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  • Web sites: Aksum | Ethiopia | Britannica.com
    Africa hundreds of years ago Aksum also was the name of the kingdom s capital It remains a city in northern Ethiopia Aksum Student Encyclopedia Ages 11 and up An ancient town in northern Ethiopia Aksum was once the seat of the kingdom of Aksum It is now a tourist town and religious center best known for its antiquities Submit a Web site Name URL Description I agree to the

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  • Aksum -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia
    lie broken in the central square One measuring 110 feet 34 metres now fallen is said to be the tallest obelisk ever erected The obelisks range from nearly plain slabs to intricately inscribed pillars Door and window like shapes are carved into some of the pillars giving them the appearance of slender buildings The most recent of the obelisks announces the adoption of Christianity by a 4th century king One of these remarkable objects dated to at least 300 ce was looted by Italian troops in 1937 Returned to Ethiopia by the Italian government in 2005 it was reerected in Aksum in time for the celebration of Ethiopia s millennium year in 2008 which was 2000 by the Coptic calendar At least 27 carved stone thrones have been unearthed in the overgrown ruins of the ancient palace Aksum has long been regarded a holy city for the Ethiopian Orthodox church It forms the setting of the 14th century work Kebra Negast Glory of the Kings which relates the tradition of the transference of the Ark of the Covenant from Jerusalem to Aksum by King Menilek I legendary son of Solomon and the Queen of Sheba Makeda According to tradition the

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