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  • Beijing | national capital, China | Britannica.com
    intensively cultivated and supplies vegetables and fruits to the population of the central zone The near suburb accounts for about 8 percent of the metropolitan area The third zone the far suburb constitutes the remainder of the metropolitan area This zone functions as the economic base supplying coal lumber construction materials vegetables and fruits dairy products water and some grain crops to the urban population in the central zone and the near suburb Climate Though Beijing is a relatively short distance from the sea the general air circulation in the region is mainly from the northwest throughout the year maritime effects on the region s weather are meagre The climate is clearly of the continental monsoon type that occurs in the temperate zone Local topography also has a great effect on Beijing s climate Because it lies in a lowland area and is protected by mountains the city is a little warmer in winter than other areas of China located at the same latitude nonetheless the mean monthly temperature drops below 50 F 10 C for five months out of the year In addition wind direction in Beijing is influenced by topography with changes occurring from day to night Generally there are more southerly winds in the day but northerly or northwesterly winds at night The annual mean temperature of the city is 53 F 12 C The coldest month is January when the monthly mean is 24 F 4 C and the warmest month is July when it is 79 F 26 C In an average year the city experiences 132 days of freezing temperatures between October and March the mean annual precipitation is 25 inches 635 mm with most of the total falling from June to August July is ordinarily the wettest month of the year with an average of 9 inches 230 mm One of the characteristics of the region s precipitation is its variability In 1959 an extremely wet year for Beijing the total precipitation amounted to 55 inches 1 400 mm whereas in 1891 an extremely dry year only 7 inches 180 mm fell The average number of rainy days per year is about 80 and the average relative humidity for the city is 57 percent Winter in Beijing is long and usually begins in late October when northwesterly winds gradually gain strength This seasonal wind system dominates the region until March the Siberian air that passes southward over the Mongolian Plateau and into China proper is cold and dry bringing little snow or other precipitation The monthly mean temperature from December to February is below freezing Spring the windiest season is short and rapidly becomes warm The prevailing high spring winds produce an evaporation rate that averages about nine times the total precipitation for the period and frequently is sufficient to cause droughts that are harmful to agriculture Dust storms in the region exacerbated by increasing desertification in Inner Mongolia are common in April and May In addition to being the season of torrential rains summer is rather hot as warm and humid air from the southeast often penetrates into North China Autumn begins in late September and is a pleasant though short season with clear skies and comfortable temperatures Plant life Beijing planting trees on a slope northwest of central Beijing AP Although the city of Beijing with its surrounding districts is one of the most densely populated parts of China portions of the municipality notably in the mountainous hinterland are much more sparsely settled and support a wide variety of vegetation The municipality s mountain areas are within the temperate deciduous forest zone while the more southerly plains area is part of the wooded steppe zone Continuous deforestation by humans for centuries however has stripped the woodlands in most sections of the metropolitan area Mixed forests composed mainly of pine oak and Manchurian birch now cover only mountains in the northeast and the west Distinct vertical forest zones can be seen at higher elevations The lower slopes of many hills to the west of the city being the most accessible to humans have lost their original forest cover only bushes and shrubs now dot the landscape there A variety of species grow on sunny slopes between elevations of about 2 300 and 5 600 feet 700 and 1 700 metres including Manchurian birch Dahurian birch trembling poplar Mongolian oak and Liaotung oak Between 5 600 and 6 250 feet 1 700 and 1 900 metres a mixed forest of truncated maple and trembling poplar replaces all other species Above 6 250 feet goat willow becomes the dominant tree The larger part of the lowland areas of Beijing has been either cultivated or occupied by various settlements and for the most part it is bare of any natural vegetation Occasionally some small groves of planted trees may be seen in the vicinity of villages these are composed mainly of mixed woods consisting of oil pine Chinese juniper Chinese cypress willow elm and Chinese locust In addition the government has made a concerted and sustained effort to plant trees in and around the central city City layout Tiananmen Kevin Morris Stone Getty Images The traditional core of Beijing essentially consisted of two walled cities the walls no longer stand the northern inner city and the southern outer city The inner city also known conventionally as Tatar City lay to the southwest of the site of the Mongol city of Dadu it was in the form of a square with walls having a perimeter of nearly 15 miles 24 km The outer city also known as the Chinese City was added during the reign of the Ming emperor Jiajing 1521 66 67 it was in the form of an oblong adjoining the inner city with walls that were 14 miles 23 km in length including 4 miles 6 km of the southern wall of the inner city Within the inner city was the Imperial City also in the form of a square which had red plastered walls 6 5 miles 10 5 km in length The only remaining portions of that wall are on either side of the Tiananmen Tian anmen Gate of Heavenly Peace the southern and main entrance to the Imperial City that stands at the northern end of Tiananmen Square Within the Imperial City in turn was the moated Forbidden City with walls 2 25 miles 3 6 km long The Forbidden City contains the former Imperial Palaces which are now the Palace Museum Beijing represents better than any other existing city the heritage of Chinese architectural achievement During each dynasty in which the city was the capital care was consistently taken to preserve tradition when it was rebuilt or remodeled Few cities in the world can thus rival Beijing in the regularity and harmony of its city plan Mao Zedong Memorial Hall China Photos Getty Image The urban plan based on traditional Chinese geomantic practices was composed about a single straight line drawn north and south through the centre of the Forbidden City on which the internal coherence of the city hinged All the city walls important city gates main avenues and streets religious buildings and daily shopping markets were systematically arranged in relation to this central axis Because the central axis has historically signified the authority of the ruling dynasty many official buildings public grounds and city gates were located along this line From north to south this line passed through the Bell Tower Zhonglou the Drum Tower Gulou Jingshan Park the Forbidden City including the Imperial Palaces Tiananmen Square Qianmen Front Gate the Tianqiao neighbourhood and no longer standing Yongding Gate The symmetrical layout of the city to the east and west of this line is quite striking In front of the palaces the Temple of the Imperial Ancestors now in the People s Cultural Park on the east side of the axis is balanced by the Altar of Earth and Harvests now in Zhongshan Park on the west Farther away from the palaces the market area of Dongdan to the east was balanced by the Xidan market to the west these still form two of Beijing s main business districts The Tiantan Temple of Heaven Park to the south of the inner city is counterbalanced by the Ditan Altar of the Earth Park to the north of the city Of the 16 city gates constructed in Ming times 7 were located on each side of the north south line and 2 were situated on the line itself Only a few of the old gates still stand but the city streets adjacent to their sites continue to carry their names The main avenues of the old city whether running north south or east west connected the gates on the opposite walls and divided the whole city into a rectangular grid Within the walls buildings were constructed around a courtyard or series of courtyards with every important building facing south Buildings often stood behind one another along the north south line with small courtyards in between This prevailing southern orientation of buildings has a climatic functional basis but it also appears to have been sanctified or conventionalized early in the Bronze Age in connection with ancestral ceremonies and with the worship of heaven and earth Since 1949 the greatest changes in Beijing s appearance have been the extension of its streets immediately outside the former old city walls and the accelerating pace of new construction throughout the city On the west side of the old city an area extending about 1 mile 1 6 km from the spot where the Fuxing Gate stood has become an extension of the avenue Xichang an Jie and is used primarily for government offices Toward the Summer Palace to the northwest is the Haidian district where the most important universities and research institutes of the country are located To the north of the city the outlying districts have been developed as a housing area adjoining the educational district in the northwest The eastern suburb is an industrial district dominated by the manufacture of chemicals automobiles and agricultural machinery Vegetable fields in the southern suburb are gradually being supplanted by industrial plants More recently the look of the central city especially in the eastern sections has been transformed by growing numbers of high rise office and apartment buildings This construction increased rapidly from 1995 reaching a fever pitch in the years leading up to the 2008 Olympic Games Housing To cope with the rapid population growth a number of housing projects have been constructed for office and factory workers since 1949 In the mid 1950s housing projects were concentrated in western areas of the city where apartment buildings were erected near government offices outside the Fuxing Gate site Subsequently a large number of multiunit housing estates were built in the northern districts between the Anding Gate site and Desheng Gate centring on the residential neighbourhood of Hepingli The Hepingli housing development contains primary and secondary schools nurseries hotels and recreational facilities as well as scores of four or five story apartment buildings In addition there are many groups of single family houses in the northern suburbs with associated parks theatres and recreational centres All these buildings were supplied with water and natural gas as they were constructed in contrast with structures in the older parts of the city where it took longer to provide such services In the area outside the Jianguo Gate site to the east of the central city apartment buildings accommodate the families of office workers employed in nearby government office buildings This area has also become the diplomatic district containing many foreign embassies and a number of Western style houses for diplomatic representatives and their families and a locus of high rise construction Many dilapidated houses have been pulled down in the older districts inside the former city walls and have been replaced by multistory apartment buildings Urban renewal projects however have been unable to match population growth As a consequence many traditional living compounds originally designed centuries ago to house the families of officials during the Qing dynasty have been repaired or renovated and subdivided to provide quarters for three or four families per compound Each family in a compound faces a public courtyard and shares a common front gate with other families Many factories in the eastern and southern outskirts of the city have erected apartment buildings to house workers as a way to reduce commuting traffic in the metropolis These workers residences constitute independent communities and are located so that they are easily accessible from the place of work yet are far enough away to minimize noise and smoke Satellite towns also have been developed in the rural counties in an effort to disperse population and industries from the central city Industries have been established in rural areas in order to absorb surplus labourers and to supplement farmers incomes Architecture Traditional dwellings Beijing s heritage of Chinese architectural achievement is exemplified by both private housing and public buildings As the whole city was laid out in a rectangular street pattern symmetrically arranged around the palace compound almost every dwelling in the city is also rectangular in form with the four sides squarely facing the cardinal directions Most houses in the inner city were designed as residences for former officials and their families and almost every dwelling compound is surrounded by high walls with an open courtyard in the centre flanked by houses on the eastern western and northern sides usually one story high The former residences of high ranking officials were composed of two or three compounds interconnected along a north south axis Just inside the high wooden sill of the front gate of a large compound was a brick screen wall a structure that was supposed to shut off intruding evil spirits as well as prevent curious passersby from looking inside Beyond the screen was the outer or service courtyard flanked by houses to the east and west In former days these structures held the compound s kitchen and the living quarters for the gatekeeper servants and any visiting guests and relatives A red painted gate led through the north wall of the outer court into the main part of the house built around three sides of the main courtyard the courtyard usually shaded by a large tree was the centre of the family s life All the windows looked inward to it and a double door opened into it from each of the three wings The windows extended from about three feet one metre above the ground up to the deep overhanging eaves As they faced south the rooms in the main building got the maximum possible sunshine in winter and the eaves provided a pleasant shade in summer when the sun was high The wing at the northern end of the court was intended for the head of the family and his wife It was divided into three compartments the central one was the living or community room and the smaller rooms at either side were the bedroom and study The rooms facing east and west three on each side of the court were for married sons and their families This was the basic plan of all the old houses in Beijing Larger families built an extra courtyard behind the main house because the traditional ideal was that all the existing generations should live together Since 1949 however a great many of the old style houses have been adapted for use by several families Public and commercial buildings While the style and architecture of private dwelling units are uniform throughout the city the public buildings and temples are characterized by a variety of designs and structures Beijing the country s political and cultural centre for more than 700 years has more buildings of historical and architectural significance than any other contemporary city in China Since 1949 many new government and municipal buildings combining both traditional and Western architecture have been constructed Forbidden City Hall of Supreme Harmony Ron Gatepain A Britannica Publishing Partner The Imperial Palaces Palace Museum of the Forbidden City with their golden roofs white marble balustrades and red pillars stand in the heart of Beijing and are surrounded by a moat and walls with a tower on each of the four corners The palaces collectively designated a World Heritage site in 1987 consist of outer throne halls and an inner court North of the three tunnel gates that form the Wu Meridian Gate the southern entrance to the Forbidden City a great courtyard lies beyond five marble bridges Farther north is the massive double tiered Hall of Supreme Harmony Taihedian once the throne hall A marble terrace rises above the marble balustrades that surround it upon which stand beautiful ancient bronzes in the shapes of caldrons cranes turtles compasses and ancient measuring instruments The Hall of Supreme Harmony is the largest wooden structure in China Gate of Celestial Purity Gary718 Shutterstock com North of it beyond another courtyard is the Hall of Central or Complete Harmony Zhonghedian where the emperor paused to rest before going into the Hall of Supreme Harmony Beyond the Hall of Central Harmony is the last hall the Hall of Preserving Harmony Baohedian after which comes the Inner Court Neiting The Inner Court was used as the emperor s personal apartment It contains three large halls the Palace of Heavenly Purity Qianqinggong the Hall of Union Jiaotaidian and the Palace of Earthly Tranquillity Kunninggong Imperial City Palace of Heavenly Purity liquidlibrary Jupiterimages The Palace of Heavenly Purity is divided into three parts The central part was used for family feasts and family audiences audiences for foreign envoys and funeral services the eastern section was used for mourning rites and the western section for state business The other two palaces one behind the other were imperial family residences The three throne halls in the Outer Court and the three main halls in the Inner Court lie along the central

    Original URL path: http://www.britannica.com/place/Beijing (2016-02-13)
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  • infrasonics | physics | Britannica.com
    point in the world if they are of sufficient intensity The development of extremely sensitive detectors to monitor such explosions has contributed to the maintenance of the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty which was signed in 1963 and banned all tests of nuclear weapons except those conducted underground so as to limit the amount of radioactive fallout in the atmosphere Infrasonic disturbances of the atmosphere that may extend to 50 km 30 miles above Earth s surface are often associated with severe earthquakes These waves can travel considerable distances around the globe Human perception of low frequency sound waves propagating in air does not have a well defined cutoff point Above about 18 hertz sound waves appear to have tonality below this frequency the individual compression waves may be distinguished Driving an automobile with an open window may generate an infrasonic resonance The sonic boom of supersonic aircraft contains significant levels of infrasound In certain circumstances occupational exposure to infrasound may be severe transformer rooms compressor plants engine rooms and air handlers and blowers in buildings may all produce levels that are extremely high and cause discomfort Studies have shown that many people experience adverse reactions to large intensities of infrasonic frequencies developing headaches nausea blurred vision and dizziness The mechanisms by which infrasonics may be perceived by humans and their physiological effects are incompletely understood A number of animals are sensitive to infrasonic frequencies It is believed by many zoologists that this sensitivity in animals such as elephants may be helpful in providing them with early warning of earthquakes and weather disturbances It has been suggested that the sensitivity of birds to infrasound aids their navigation and even affects their migration Frequency range of hearing for humans and selected animals animal frequency hertz low high humans 20 20 000 cats 100 32 000 dogs 40 46 000 horses 31 40 000 elephants 16 12 000 cattle 16 40 000 bats 1 000 150 000 grasshoppers and locusts 100 50 000 rodents 1 000 100 000 whales and dolphins 70 150 000 seals and sea lions 200 55 000 Richard E Berg Comments Share Email Print Cite You may also be interested in sound physics matter wave physical science list of physicists science acoustics noise ultrasonics seismic wave noise pollution Keep exploring Sound Waves Calling Sound Fact or Fiction Acoustics and Radio Technology Fact or Fiction Off the Hook 10 Sharks Protected From Fishing in American Waters 9 of the World s Deadliest Spiders What made you want to look up infrasonics To From Subject Comments Please limit to 900 characters Cancel Britannica Stories Behind The News Philosophy Religion Healing the Schism Pope Meets Patriarch Behind The News Science Gravitational Waves Observed Spotlight History Thomas Malthus s 250th Birthday See More Stories FEATURED QUIZZES Vocabulary Quiz True or False Spell It See More Quizzes About Us About Our Ads Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms of Use 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Inc MLA style infrasonics Encyclopædia Britannica Encyclopædia Britannica Online Encyclopædia Britannica Inc

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  • Iwate | prefecture, Japan | Britannica.com
    24 000 buildings that were wholly or partially destroyed nearly 6 000 people were killed or were missing and presumed dead Area 5 899 square miles 15 278 square km Pop 2010 1 330 147 Comments Share Email Print Cite You may also be interested in Japan Emperors and Empresses Regnant of Japan list of prime ministers of Japan Fukushima Miyagi Akita Yamagata Aomori Asia Tokyo Yokohama Metropolitan Area Japan earthquake and tsunami of 2011 Tōhoku Keep exploring Hit the Road Quiz Get to Know Asia World Tour Trivia with a Capital Tea 5 Things You Didn t Know About Tea Editor Picks The 10 Greatest Basketball Players of All Time What made you want to look up Iwate To From Subject Comments Please limit to 900 characters Cancel Britannica Stories Behind The News Philosophy Religion Healing the Schism Pope Meets Patriarch Behind The News Science Gravitational Waves Observed Spotlight History Thomas Malthus s 250th Birthday See More Stories FEATURED QUIZZES Vocabulary Quiz True or False Spell It See More Quizzes About Us About Our Ads Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms of Use 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Inc MLA style Iwate Encyclopædia Britannica Encyclopædia Britannica Online Encyclopædia Britannica Inc 2016 Web 12 Feb 2016 http www britannica com place Iwate APA style Iwate 2016 In Encyclopædia Britannica Retrieved from http www britannica com place Iwate Harvard style Iwate 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Online Retrieved 12 February 2016 from http www britannica com place Iwate Chicago Manual of Style Encyclopædia Britannica Online s v Iwate accessed February 12 2016 http www britannica com place Iwate While every effort has been made to follow citation style rules there may be some discrepancies Please refer to the appropriate style manual or other sources if you have any questions Update Link Click anywhere inside the article

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  • Fukushima | prefecture, Japan | Britannica.com
    at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant Tokyo Electric Power Co Kyodo News AP On March 11 2011 the prefecture was struck by a severe earthquake magnitude 9 0 centred offshore to the northeast in the Pacific Although the temblor and a series of aftershocks caused some damage considerably more destruction was done by a powerful series of tsunami waves generated by the main shock that inundated coastal areas Particularly hard hit were Iwaki and the Fukushima Daiichi Number One nuclear power station located along the prefecture s northeast coast The degree of property damage in the affected areas was considerable including more than 85 000 buildings either wholly or partially destroyed and about 1 800 people were killed by the tsunami or were missing and presumed dead However in the weeks and months following the disaster another major crisis developed after a meltdown in reactor cores at the Daiichi plant caused a nuclear accident there that forced officials to create a wide evacuation zone around the stricken facility Communities within a 12 5 mile 20 km radius of the plant remained abandoned because of persistent radioactive contamination in the region Area 5 321 square miles 13 782 square km Pop 2010 2 029 064 Comments Share Email Print Cite You may also be interested in Japan Emperors and Empresses Regnant of Japan list of prime ministers of Japan Miyagi Iwate Yamagata Akita Aomori Asia Tokyo Yokohama Metropolitan Area Japan earthquake and tsunami of 2011 Sendai Keep exploring Hit the Road Quiz Get to Know Asia World Tour 10 Incredible Uses for Eggs 9 Fun Facts About Sleep What made you want to look up Fukushima To From Subject Comments Please limit to 900 characters Cancel Britannica Stories Behind The News Philosophy Religion Healing the Schism Pope Meets Patriarch Behind The News Science Gravitational Waves Observed Spotlight History Thomas Malthus s 250th Birthday See More Stories FEATURED QUIZZES Vocabulary Quiz True or False Spell It See More Quizzes About Us About Our Ads Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms of Use 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Inc MLA style Fukushima Encyclopædia Britannica Encyclopædia Britannica Online Encyclopædia Britannica Inc 2016 Web 12 Feb 2016 http www britannica com place Fukushima prefecture Japan APA style Fukushima 2016 In Encyclopædia Britannica Retrieved from http www britannica com place Fukushima prefecture Japan Harvard style Fukushima 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Online Retrieved 12 February 2016 from http www britannica com place Fukushima prefecture Japan Chicago Manual of Style Encyclopædia Britannica Online s v Fukushima accessed February 12 2016 http www britannica com place Fukushima prefecture Japan While every effort has been made to follow citation style rules there may be some discrepancies Please refer to the appropriate style manual or other sources if you have any questions Update Link Click anywhere inside the article to add text or insert superscripts subscripts and special characters You can also highlight a section and use the tools in this bar to modify existing content Add links to related Britannica articles You can

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  • Ibaraki | prefecture, Japan | Britannica.com
    the resultant tsunami generated by the main quake inundated and devastated coastal areas Particularly hard hit were Hitachinaka and Kitaibaraki Area 2 354 square miles 6 096 square km Pop 2010 2 969 770 Comments Share Email Print Cite You may also be interested in Japan Emperors and Empresses Regnant of Japan Asia list of prime ministers of Japan Tokyo Yokohama Metropolitan Area Fukushima Tōhoku Miyagi Iwate Akashi Strait Bridge Keihanshin Industrial Zone Chiba Keep exploring Hit the Road Quiz Get to Know Asia World Tour Know Your Joe 5 Things You Didn t Know About Coffee 9 Fun Facts About Sleep What made you want to look up Ibaraki To From Subject Comments Please limit to 900 characters Cancel Britannica Stories Behind The News Philosophy Religion Healing the Schism Pope Meets Patriarch Behind The News Science Gravitational Waves Observed Spotlight History Thomas Malthus s 250th Birthday See More Stories FEATURED QUIZZES Vocabulary Quiz True or False Spell It See More Quizzes About Us About Our Ads Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms of Use 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Inc MLA style Ibaraki Encyclopædia Britannica Encyclopædia Britannica Online Encyclopædia Britannica Inc 2016 Web 12 Feb 2016 http www britannica com place Ibaraki APA style Ibaraki 2016 In Encyclopædia Britannica Retrieved from http www britannica com place Ibaraki Harvard style Ibaraki 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Online Retrieved 12 February 2016 from http www britannica com place Ibaraki Chicago Manual of Style Encyclopædia Britannica Online s v Ibaraki accessed February 12 2016 http www britannica com place Ibaraki While every effort has been made to follow citation style rules there may be some discrepancies Please refer to the appropriate style manual or other sources if you have any questions Update Link Click anywhere inside the article to add text or insert superscripts subscripts and special

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  • Chiba | prefecture, Japan | Britannica.com
    international airport Area 1 991 square miles 5 156 square km Pop 2010 6 216 289 Comments Share Email Print Cite You may also be interested in Japan Emperors and Empresses Regnant of Japan Tone River list of prime ministers of Japan Asia Tokyo Yokohama Metropolitan Area Fukushima Tōhoku Miyagi Akashi Strait Bridge Iwate Keihanshin Industrial Zone Keep exploring Hit the Road Quiz Get to Know Asia World Tour Food for Thought The Origins of 6 Favorite Foods Nutritional Powerhouses 8 Foods That Pack a Nutritional Punch What made you want to look up Chiba To From Subject Comments Please limit to 900 characters Cancel Britannica Stories Behind The News Philosophy Religion Healing the Schism Pope Meets Patriarch Behind The News Science Gravitational Waves Observed Spotlight History Thomas Malthus s 250th Birthday See More Stories FEATURED QUIZZES Vocabulary Quiz True or False Spell It See More Quizzes About Us About Our Ads Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms of Use 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Inc MLA style Chiba Encyclopædia Britannica Encyclopædia Britannica Online Encyclopædia Britannica Inc 2016 Web 12 Feb 2016 http www britannica com place Chiba prefecture Japan APA style Chiba 2016 In Encyclopædia Britannica Retrieved from http www britannica com place Chiba prefecture Japan Harvard style Chiba 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Online Retrieved 12 February 2016 from http www britannica com place Chiba prefecture Japan Chicago Manual of Style Encyclopædia Britannica Online s v Chiba accessed February 12 2016 http www britannica com place Chiba prefecture Japan While every effort has been made to follow citation style rules there may be some discrepancies Please refer to the appropriate style manual or other sources if you have any questions Update Link Click anywhere inside the article to add text or insert superscripts subscripts and special characters You can also highlight a section

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  • Kamaishi | Japan | Britannica.com
    the existing Rikuchū kaigan National Park as part of a larger entity stretching north and south along the coast Pop 2005 42 987 2010 39 574 Comments Share Email Print Cite Last Updated 12 22 2014 You may also be interested in Tōhoku Honshu Morioka Miyako Mizusawa Asia Kyōto Japan earthquake and tsunami of 2011 Mount Fuji Tokugawa period Hiroshima Tokyo Yokohama Metropolitan Area Keep exploring Capitals Cities Fact or Fiction Hit the Road Quiz World Cities Food for Thought The Origins of 6 Favorite Foods Nutritional Powerhouses 8 Foods That Pack a Nutritional Punch What made you want to look up Kamaishi To From Subject Comments Please limit to 900 characters Cancel Britannica Stories Behind The News Philosophy Religion Healing the Schism Pope Meets Patriarch Behind The News Science Gravitational Waves Observed Spotlight History Thomas Malthus s 250th Birthday See More Stories FEATURED QUIZZES Vocabulary Quiz True or False Spell It See More Quizzes About Us About Our Ads Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms of Use 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Inc MLA style Kamaishi Encyclopædia Britannica Encyclopædia Britannica Online Encyclopædia Britannica Inc 2016 Web 12 Feb 2016 http www britannica com place Kamaishi APA style Kamaishi 2016 In Encyclopædia Britannica Retrieved from http www britannica com place Kamaishi Harvard style Kamaishi 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Online Retrieved 12 February 2016 from http www britannica com place Kamaishi Chicago Manual of Style Encyclopædia Britannica Online s v Kamaishi accessed February 12 2016 http www britannica com place Kamaishi While every effort has been made to follow citation style rules there may be some discrepancies Please refer to the appropriate style manual or other sources if you have any questions Update Link Click anywhere inside the article to add text or insert superscripts subscripts and special characters You can also highlight a section

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  • Miyako | port, Japan | Britannica.com
    Area Keep exploring Capitals Cities Fact or Fiction Hit the Road Quiz World Cities 9 Unsportsmanlike Sportsmen 10 Incredible Uses for Eggs What made you want to look up Miyako To From Subject Comments Please limit to 900 characters Cancel FEATURED QUIZZES Vocabulary Quiz True or False Spell It See More Quizzes MORE QUIZZES A Serving of Fruit Sports Authority Fact or Fiction World Cuisine Fact or Fiction See More Quizzes About Us About Our Ads Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms of Use 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Inc MLA style Miyako Encyclopædia Britannica Encyclopædia Britannica Online Encyclopædia Britannica Inc 2016 Web 12 Feb 2016 http www britannica com place Miyako APA style Miyako 2016 In Encyclopædia Britannica Retrieved from http www britannica com place Miyako Harvard style Miyako 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Online Retrieved 12 February 2016 from http www britannica com place Miyako Chicago Manual of Style Encyclopædia Britannica Online s v Miyako accessed February 12 2016 http www britannica com place Miyako While every effort has been made to follow citation style rules there may be some discrepancies Please refer to the appropriate style manual or other sources if you have any questions Update Link Click anywhere inside the article to add text or insert superscripts subscripts and special characters You can also highlight a section and use the tools in this bar to modify existing content Add links to related Britannica articles You can double click any word or highlight a word or phrase in the text below and then select an article from the search box Or simply highlight a word or phrase in the article then enter the article name or term you d like to link to in the search box below and select from the list of results Note we do not allow links to

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