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  • Quebec Act | Great Britain [1774] | Britannica.com
    boundaries given the province by the Proclamation of 1763 were extended This was done because no satisfactory means had been found to regulate native affairs and to govern the French settlers on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers It was decided therefore to put the territory between the Ohio and the Mississippi under the governor of Quebec and the boundaries of Quebec were extended westward and southward to the junction of the Ohio and the Mississippi and northward to the height of land between the Great Lakes and Hudson Bay This provision of the act together with the recognition of the Roman Catholic religion was seen to threaten the unity security and not least the territorial ambitions of British America Many American colonists viewed the act as a measure of coercion The act was thus a major cause of the American Revolution and helped provoke an invasion of Quebec by the armies of the revolting colonies in the winter of 1775 76 Its provisions on the other hand did little at the time to win French support of British rule in Quebec and except for the clergy and seigneurs most of the French colonists remained neutral The act eventually became important to French Canadians as the basis of their religious and legal rights Comments Share Email Print Cite Last Updated 5 1 2015 You may also be interested in Intolerable Acts American Revolution Voting Rights Act Compromise of 1850 Sherman Antitrust Act Missouri Compromise Civil Rights Act Navigation Acts Frederick North Lord North Jim Crow law Townshend Acts Nürnberg Laws Keep exploring Structures of Government Fact or Fiction All American History Quiz American History and Politics Order in the Court 10 Trials of the Century Editor Picks Top 10 Must Visit Fictional Lands What made you want to look up Quebec Act To From Subject Comments Please limit to 900 characters Cancel Britannica Stories Behind The News Philosophy Religion Healing the Schism Pope Meets Patriarch Behind The News Science Gravitational Waves Observed Spotlight History Thomas Malthus s 250th Birthday See More Stories FEATURED QUIZZES Vocabulary Quiz True or False Spell It See More Quizzes About Us About Our Ads Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms of Use 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Inc MLA style Quebec Act Encyclopædia Britannica Encyclopædia Britannica Online Encyclopædia Britannica Inc 2016 Web 12 Feb 2016 http www britannica com event Quebec Act APA style Quebec Act 2016 In Encyclopædia Britannica Retrieved from http www britannica com event Quebec Act Harvard style Quebec Act 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Online Retrieved 12 February 2016 from http www britannica com event Quebec Act Chicago Manual of Style Encyclopædia Britannica Online s v Quebec Act accessed February 12 2016 http www britannica com event Quebec Act While every effort has been made to follow citation style rules there may be some discrepancies Please refer to the appropriate style manual or other sources if you have any questions Update Link Click anywhere inside the article to add text or insert superscripts subscripts and special characters

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  • Intolerable Acts | Great Britain [1774] | Britannica.com
    earlier Quartering Act which had been allowed to expire in 1770 Passed on June 2 1774 the new Quartering Act applied to all of British America and gave colonial governors the right to requisition unoccupied buildings to house British troops However in Massachusetts the British troops were forced to remain camped on the Boston Common until the following November because the Boston patriots refused to allow workmen to repair the vacant buildings General Gage had obtained for quarters The Quebec Act under consideration since 1773 removed all the territory and fur trade between the Ohio and Mississippi rivers from possible colonial jurisdiction and awarded it to the province of Quebec By establishing French civil law and the Roman Catholic religion in the coveted area Britain acted liberally toward Quebec s settlers but raised the spectre of popery before the mainly Protestant colonies to Canada s south The Intolerable Acts represented an attempt to reimpose strict British control over the American colonies but after 10 years of vacillation the decision to be firm had come too late Rather than cowing Massachusetts and separating it from the other colonies the oppressive measures became the justification for convening the First Continental Congress later in 1774 Comments Share Email Print Cite Last Updated 4 1 2015 You may also be interested in American Revolution Townshend Acts Quebec Act Statute of Westminster Sugar Act Tea Act Declaratory Act William Legge 2nd earl of Dartmouth Molasses Act Australian Colonies Government Act Iron Act Hat Act Keep exploring All American History Quiz American History and Politics History Buff Quiz Order in the Court 10 Trials of the Century From Box Office to Ballot Box 10 Celebrity Politicians What made you want to look up Intolerable Acts To From Subject Comments Please limit to 900 characters Cancel Britannica Stories Behind The News Philosophy Religion Healing the Schism Pope Meets Patriarch Behind The News Science Gravitational Waves Observed Spotlight History Thomas Malthus s 250th Birthday See More Stories FEATURED QUIZZES Vocabulary Quiz True or False Spell It See More Quizzes About Us About Our Ads Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms of Use 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Inc MLA style Intolerable Acts Encyclopædia Britannica Encyclopædia Britannica Online Encyclopædia Britannica Inc 2016 Web 12 Feb 2016 http www britannica com event Intolerable Acts APA style Intolerable Acts 2016 In Encyclopædia Britannica Retrieved from http www britannica com event Intolerable Acts Harvard style Intolerable Acts 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Online Retrieved 12 February 2016 from http www britannica com event Intolerable Acts Chicago Manual of Style Encyclopædia Britannica Online s v Intolerable Acts accessed February 12 2016 http www britannica com event Intolerable Acts While every effort has been made to follow citation style rules there may be some discrepancies Please refer to the appropriate style manual or other sources if you have any questions Update Link Click anywhere inside the article to add text or insert superscripts subscripts and special characters You can also highlight a section and use the tools in this

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  • Wagner Act | United States [1935] | Britannica.com
    the legal right of most workers notably excepting agricultural and domestic workers to organize or join labour unions and to bargain collectively with their employers Sponsored by Democratic Sen Robert F Wagner of New York the Wagner Act established the federal government as the regulator and ultimate arbiter of labour relations It set up a permanent three member later five member National Labor Relations Board NLRB with the power to

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  • Act of Settlement | Great Britain [1701] | Britannica.com
    that all matters properly cognizable in the Privy Council shall be transacted there and that all resolutions shall be signed by such of the Privy Council as shall advise and consent to the same Another declared that all officeholders and pensioners under the Crown shall be incapable of sitting in the House of Commons The first of these clauses which was an attempt to destroy the growing power of the Cabinet was repealed and the second was seriously modified in 1706 Another clause repealed in the reign of George I forbade the sovereign to leave England Scotland or Ireland without the consent of Parliament Finally a clause said that no person born out of the kingdoms of England Scotland or Ireland or the dominions thereunto belonging although he be naturalized or made a denizen except such as are born of English parents shall be capable to be of the Privy Council or a member of either House of Parliament or enjoy any office or place of trust either civil or military or to have any grant of lands tenements or hereditaments from the Crown to himself or to any other or others in trust for him By the Naturalization Act of 1870 this clause was virtually repealed for all persons who obtain a certificate of naturalization Comments Share Email Print Cite You may also be interested in Voting Rights Act Compromise of 1850 Sherman Antitrust Act Missouri Compromise Navigation Acts Civil Rights Act Nürnberg Laws Jim Crow law Townshend Acts Quebec Act Intolerable Acts Wagner Act Keep exploring British Culture and Politics Exploring French History European History 9 Mysterious Disappearances of People Other Than Amelia Earhart Swashbuckling Sisters 6 Lady Pirates What made you want to look up Act of Settlement To From Subject Comments Please limit to 900 characters Cancel Britannica Stories Behind The News Philosophy Religion Healing the Schism Pope Meets Patriarch Behind The News Science Gravitational Waves Observed Spotlight History Thomas Malthus s 250th Birthday See More Stories FEATURED QUIZZES Vocabulary Quiz True or False Spell It See More Quizzes About Us About Our Ads Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms of Use 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Inc MLA style Act of Settlement Encyclopædia Britannica Encyclopædia Britannica Online Encyclopædia Britannica Inc 2016 Web 12 Feb 2016 http www britannica com event Act of Settlement Great Britain 1701 APA style Act of Settlement 2016 In Encyclopædia Britannica Retrieved from http www britannica com event Act of Settlement Great Britain 1701 Harvard style Act of Settlement 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Online Retrieved 12 February 2016 from http www britannica com event Act of Settlement Great Britain 1701 Chicago Manual of Style Encyclopædia Britannica Online s v Act of Settlement accessed February 12 2016 http www britannica com event Act of Settlement Great Britain 1701 While every effort has been made to follow citation style rules there may be some discrepancies Please refer to the appropriate style manual or other sources if you have any questions Update Link Click anywhere inside the article

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  • A Study of History: Who, What, Where, and When Quiz | Britannica.com
    higher your score When you re done try again to beat your best score vm state secondsLeft fixedLength 2 QUESTION vm state currentQuestion 1 of vm questions length Timer Score vm state score A Study of History Who What Where and When vm state secondsLeft fixedLength 2 QUESTION vm state currentQuestion 1 of vm questions length Timer Score vm state score A Study of History Who What Where and When 0 vm state nextLabel Quiz Results A Study of History Who What Where and When vm state numberCorrect vm questions length correct vm state score vm maxPoints points Replay Share your score Log in to save your score History Exploring Russia Fact or Fiction Music A Study of Musicians Animals Cry Wolf Fact or Fiction Technology Internet Firsts Fact or Fiction Society Yemen Quiz Are you a Quizmaster Log in to save your score and compete against the community Compare your score Max Score vm maxPoints New Best Score vm state score vm communityAverage number 0 Your Score Community Average High scores Your results vm state responsesVisible Hide Show Answers Questions Correct vm state numberCorrect vm questions length Total Score vm state score vm maxPoints Question Question index 1 Your

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  • 10 Frequently Confused Literary Terms | Britannica.com
    is defined as an elaborate or fanciful way of expressing something in which that something can be absolutely anything from the weather it s raining cats and dogs to the entire world as the Bard once famously penned All the world s a stage and all the men and women merely players Simply put a metaphor is a direct substitution of one concept or object for another with the goal to draw a comparison between the two concepts or objects The use of the metaphor forces a reader to actively engage with what is being said in order to understand in what ways the concepts are related so that he or she can see the subject in an entirely new light Many perceive metaphors as the language of poetry though they are not completely limited to such elevated language They are often found in everyday speech novels and formal declamations in which persuasion is the speaker s primary goal 5 Symbol Another commonly used and yet confused literary device a symbol stands for something Symbols and metaphors are easily mixed up because both in effect stand in for another idea or object However it s usually the case that symbols stand in for more abstract concepts or institutions and are presented in different ways than metaphors An easy example is the flag of the United States People see it and immediately think of the White House or Declaration of Independence because it has come to be associated with those things in the same way that the French flag conjures images of the Eiffel Tower or the wide countryside of France In literature one of the best known symbols is Hester Prynne s scarlet A that she s forced to wear throughout Nathaniel Hawthorne s iconic novel The Scarlet Letter The symbol evolves through the novel and comes to stand for a plethora of concepts first and foremost adultery and then as Prynne s perception of her crime changes she and readers see it as a symbol for angel The key point here is that metaphors swap one for one whereas a symbol can stand in for a plethora of images and concepts that are typically abstract and have the possibility to evolve in their meanings 4 Denotation Now I know what you are thinking Let s denotate an explosive Sure thing explosive a substance such as dynamite that is used to cause an explosion Beware not to confuse denotation with detonation or more importantly with its sibling connotation A denotation is the literal or primary meaning of a word or phrase In fact it can be used as a glorified synonym for definition when discussing a word s meaning The importance of a denotation becomes apparent when analyzing an author s specific word choice namely when the word is foreign or new to a reader However knowing the strict definition of a word or the literal meaning of a phrase only goes so far That s where connotation comes in

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  • 5 Wacky Facts about U.S. Presidents | Britannica.com
    of 1751 by Parliament Formerly the Julian calendar was in use in Britain and its colonies The change added 11 days to the date This act also changed the date of the new year from March 25 to January 1 Hence if there had been a calendar on the wall at Washington s birth it might have read February 11 3 March 8 Matchup Library of Congress Washington D C Millard Fillmore 13th president and William Howard Taft 27th both died on March 8 Fillmore died in Buffalo New York in 1874 at age 74 as a result of a stroke Taft died in Washington D C in 1930 at age 72 of heart disease At 340 pounds it is somewhat remarkable that Taft exceeded the life expectancy of his time He once wrote a friend Took a long horseback ride today feel fine The friend replied How s the horse 2 Seventy year Split Library of Congress Washington D C James K Polk 11th president and Warren G Harding 29th were both born on November 2 seventy years apart Polk was born in North Carolina in 1795 Harding was born in Ohio in 1865 1 Boxing Day Blues Courtesy Gerald R Ford Library Harry Truman 33rd president and Gerald Ford 38th both died on December 26 Truman died in 1972 at the age of 88 in Kansas City Missouri of cardiovascular disease Ford lived to be 93 years old He died in 2006 in Rancho Mirage California of vascular diseases He lived the longest of any president 45 days longer than Ronald Reagan Your Reaction 5 Unbelievable Facts About Christopher Columbus When Losers Finish First Top 10 Second Place Victories MORE History LISTS 11 Handsome Historical Figures All in the Family 8 Famous Sets of Siblings There s a

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  • Michel Martelly | president of Haiti | Britannica.com
    relations firm to manage his campaign and deftly positioned himself as a political outsider who could bring change to the poor quake ravaged country First round balloting in the presidential contest took place on November 28 2010 After Haiti s electoral commission announced that the election had resulted in the need for a runoff between Mirlande Manigat a legal scholar and the wife of a former Haitian president and ruling party candidate Jude Célestin supporters of Martelly who was said to have come in third rioted in response The Organization of American States later concluded that there had been widespread fraud in the vote counting and in February 2011 the electoral commission ruled that Martelly would replace Célestin in the runoff Martelly easily defeated Manigat and was sworn into office on May 14 2011 As president Martelly sought to hasten the pace of reconstruction in Haiti where hundreds of thousands of the displaced subsisted in squalid tent settlements and to lure more foreign investment to the country He also pledged to improve public education and established a fund to help guarantee access to primary schooling for all Haitian children However his policies stalled amid frequent clashes with parliament After being unable to agree to a date for the general election parliament expired in January 2015 as the terms of most members ended Martelly subsequently ruled by executive order a move that drew much criticism His leadership was also questioned as a number of staff members and associates were arrested for alleged crimes that included rape and murder Martelly was constitutionally barred from seeking a second term and the presidential election was held in October 2015 amid charges of fraud the candidate he supported a little known businessman placed first After protests delayed a runoff vote Martelly agreed to let the recently installed parliament select an interim president and he left office on February 7 2016 Sherman Hollar EB Editors Comments Share Email Print Cite Last Updated 2 9 2016 You may also be interested in Miles Davis Duke Ellington Benny Goodman Charlie Parker Count Basie John Coltrane Dizzy Gillespie Nat King Cole Ray Charles Ornette Coleman Cab Calloway Gene Krupa Keep exploring Structures of Government Fact or Fiction Music Fact or Fiction Music Quiz 8 Funny Females of Saturday Night Live History Vile or Visionary 11 Art Controversies of the Last Four Centuries What made you want to look up Michel Martelly To From Subject Comments Please limit to 900 characters Cancel Britannica Stories Behind The News Philosophy Religion Healing the Schism Pope Meets Patriarch Behind The News Science Gravitational Waves Observed Spotlight History Thomas Malthus s 250th Birthday See More Stories FEATURED QUIZZES Vocabulary Quiz True or False Spell It See More Quizzes About Us About Our Ads Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms of Use 2016 Encyclopædia Britannica Inc MLA style Michel Martelly Encyclopædia Britannica Encyclopædia Britannica Online Encyclopædia Britannica Inc 2016 Web 12 Feb 2016 http www britannica com biography Michel Martelly APA style Michel Martelly 2016 In

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