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  • BT | A | Works » The Freezing of Vancouver’s One Million Dollar Line?
    1 million line analysis is 68 355 In 2014 about 55 percent 37 800 of the total number of Single Family properties in the City of Vancouver were worth more than 1 million While 1 135 Single Family properties in the City of Vancouver valued at under the 1 million line became valued at more than 1 million between 2013 to 2014 740 SF properties valued at more than 1 million in 2013 fell below the 1 million line in 2014 In terms of value category growth categories of homes under 3 million did not see significant increases in their numbers however homes worth between 4 million to 5 million and over 5 million saw sizable growth at 7 and 10 percent respectively Study Write up The 2014 BTAworks edition of the 1 million in the City of Vancouver s One family Dwelling or RS districts is the fourth version of our series in exploring the changing patterns of Single Family property values in the City of Vancouver We have continued to followed the same methodology of our 2013 study which follows the pathways of our 2012 and 2011 studies Generally speaking the observations and zoning histories remain steady from

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2014/01/25/the-freezing-of-vancouvers-one-million-dollar-line/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » The Erosion of Vancouver’s One Million Dollar Line
    formally and informally With the defacto two dwelling units found in many Vancouver Specials built in the 1960s to 1980s to the more recent adaptation of legalized secondary suites and laneway homes the definition of single family zoning has increasingly loosen Utilizing laneway homes and legalized secondary suites property owners in SF districts can now build up to 3 units of housing on most lots in this traditionally Single Family zoning area The policies that have theoretically led to the tripling of housing units in one family dwelling districts have been done under the auspices of increasing the amount of affordable rental homes in the City However one aspect to note in these changes is that the sizes of laneway houses are regulated by the City of Vancouver and is dependent on lot size and not all single family properties automatically qualify for a laneway house See this link for exact specifications For example should a property qualify the maximum unit laneway house for a standard 33 foot by 122 foot lot the most prevalent lot size in the City of Vancouver single family home districts is 500 square feet or 46 square meters and 750 square feet or 70 square meters for 50 by 122 lots The levels of success and impacts of these policies in achieving this goal particularly for families with children in the world s second most unaffordable housing market will perhaps be the subject of a future paper With these new analytic capacities to the 2013 map one prime observation is the steady erosion of the 1 million line Since release of the 2012 property assessments about 2 200 properties have crossed the 1 million line Where in 2009 Main St the closest arterial and Ontario Street in particular symbolized a very pronounced division for properties over and under 1 millions this division has continuously eroded In 2013 about 54 percent of the total number of Single Family properties in the City of Vancouver were valued at over 1 000 000 while in 2009 about 34 percent were worth over 1 000 000 when controlled for inflation However this erosion also comes from the southeast section of the city In the Victoria Fraserview and Killarney local planning area these areas have seen the largest amount of properties cross the 1 million line Beyond a bi variable red and blue over and under 1 million value map when values are mapped at 1 dollar intervals they further highlight the progression of high value homes in the City of Vancouver especially at the very high end For homes worth more than 5 million they grew by nearly 250 percent in the span of 4 years In 2013 about 708 01 percent of all Single Family properties in the City of Vancouver were valued at over 5 000 000 while in 2009 274 about 004 percent were valued at over 5 000 000 Our continued interest in the state and future of land in Vancouver s One family

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2013/03/02/the-erosion-of-vancouvers-one-million-dollar-line/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » Revisiting Vancouver’s One Million Dollar Line
    to 2012 80 percent of properties grew more than 100 000 in this one single year To place this amount in context the median household income in the City of Vancouver based on 2006 Canadian census information adjusted for inflation was 53 000 By geography the distribution of 1 million properties have slowly diffused across Main Street especially in the Riley Park Local Area the growth of 1 million properties in the southeast section of the City of Vancouver is particularly worth noting Victoria Fraserview 1 226 saw the largest number of properties cross the 1 million mark followed by the Riley Park 987 and Killarney 815 local areas On the other end of housing value spectrum the number of properties under 500 000 decreased by 80 percent from 71 properties in 2011 to 14 properties in 2012 Of these 14 properties or 0 2 percent of the study population all were located on the East of Main and well over 20 years old Moving forward a value spectrum and going beyond a geographic line may be the best way of studying and understanding property values in the Single Family districts of Vancouver Instead of a single and simple geographic line such as Main Street or more specifically Ontario Street neatly summarizing and segregating property values in the City of Vancouver value clusters are emerging throughout the City and the complexities of how much housing costs in this City Moreover when these value clusters are more finely broken down by 1 million increments they show another level of housing value distribution in the City both as an artifact of Vancouver s real estate history and as a trend of current and future real estate consumption and investment This brief will not examine the reasons behind the distributions and patterns but

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2012/03/31/revisiting-vancouvers-one-million-dollar-line/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » Should the corner store and coffee house return to residential neighbourhoods?
    Lamontagne and Boyd Thompson from the Wilder Snail we looked at the challenges and opportunities for retail commercial services to enter Vancouver s residential neighbourhoods This is Andy s slideshow In addition to previously published BTAworks papers on coffee houses and corner grocery stores the summary of his presentation was not the question of Should the corner store and coffee house return to residential neighbourhood but rather the question of

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2013/09/12/should-the-corner-store-and-coffee-house-return-to-residential-neighbourhoods/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » The Density and Flow of Major Coffee Chains in the City of Vancouver
    the Grind Cafe and Gallery on Main and the Wilder Snail in Strathcona for the forthcoming analysis and to preserve some semblance of indie cred At Bing Thom Architects we have a particular affinity to the Musette Caffe located just a few blocks from our offices First the major coffee chain census At 85 retail outlets Starbucks is by far the largest coffee chain in the City of Vancouver Followed by Tim Horton s 26 Blenz 26 JJ Bean 11 and Bean Around the World and Waves at 10 outlets Take 5 at 8 and Cafe Artigiano at 7 round out the major coffee chains in the City of Vancouver Interestingly when compared to the City of Surrey s business license database there are contrasts in coffee communities Where Vancouver has 85 Starbucks the City of Surrey has 18 outlets however the City of Surrey has 22 Tim Horton s while Vancouver has 26 Tim s Major coffee chains seem to follow a spatial pattern related to population and employment density and commuter and transportation flow in the City In short major coffee chains go where the people and the jobs are and where the people go through In certain parts of Downtown Vancouver and Broadway corridor there really is a Starbucks on every corner as the core is inundated with coffee chains However as one goes into the neighborhoods outside of Vancouver s downtown core chains take a much more opportunistic position often locating at primary commuting hubs like the Broadway Street Skytrain Station or transportation corridors like Hastings or Granville Street One can observe these relationships between major coffee chains and population densities on the map by adding a population density layer to the locations of these chains On Commercial Drive the street that arguably started Vancouver s

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2013/04/27/the-density-and-flow-of-major-coffee-chains-in-the-city-of-vancouver/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » The Life, Death, and Reincarnation of the Great Vancouver Corner Grocery
    less establishing new neighbourhood commerce inside the residential districts of Vancouver Conversely these corner for the most part groceries hold a special role in the built histories and community economies of many Vancouver neighbourhoods These buildings reflect the entrepreneurial pragmatism and guile of previous generations of Vancouverites as they have often served as economic entreports for many immigrants families from around the world to establish themselves into the City The best history of the corner grocery store amongest many other built form histories in Vancouver can be found in the book Vanishing Vancouver by Michael Kluckner In particular his CBC radio interview reflects on the disappearing corner grocery store in Vancouver Another initiative to document indie convenience store in the City of Vancouver is by the Vancouver is Awesome website with their At Your Convenience project As City policies hopefully incrementally and thoughtfully densify the City s single family neighborhoods there is a new opportunity to renew these community hubs whether it is in restarting pre existing buildings or even allowing for the construction of new ones Rediscovering and supporting the local corner grocery in various incarnations could be another step towards building a sustainable city and promoting connectivity and community in the City s neighbourhoods Certainly cities like San Francisco and Portland have shown that vibrant corner groceries and commerce can still make good neighbours In this map using business licensing data from the City of Vancouver s Open Data Catalogue it documents the remaining neighbourhood corner grocery stores in the City of Vancouver in the context of land use in the City of Vancouver The methodology of identifying and mapping a corner grocery is based on the selection of active business license whose name or trade name contained either the keywords Market or Grocery In cases of glaring

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2013/05/25/the-life-death-and-reincarnation-of-the-great-vancouver-corner-grocery/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » Data Desk
    analysis where matters About 35 percent 69 of Independents in the City of Vancouver were located inside the City s Downtown core compared to 50 percent of major coffee chains The mass major of Independents are located outside of Downtown Vancouver Within this type of dispersal one seeks how these independents help form the neighborhood identities throughout the city The top 5 planning areas with the largest amount of independents were Central Business Downtown area at 58 cafes and shops followed by Fairview 21 Kitsilano 18 Mount Pleasant 14 and the West End 10 Interestingly with the 12 Bubble Tea Houses in the study 10 are located in the outer neighborhoods of Vancouver and generally reflects the residential patterns of the City s Chinese Canadian populations particularly those with Cantonese as their mother tongue The above interactive map summarizes the number of independent and chain coffee and teahouses in the City of Vancouver by Plan Area Please excuse difference between the map viewers as we are experimenting between ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Explorer Online and would like to hear from readers about your preferences Independents have a tendency of appearing in clusters throughout the City of Vancouver While one ought to note the effects of land use zoning which in the City of Vancouver tends to concentrate commercial and retail activities on to main arterials and designated high streets Independents tend to locate near one another The best example of this occurs on 3 blocks of Commercial Drive 1200 to 1400 blocks in Grandview Woodlands with 4 Independents Moreover outside of Downtown certain street segments on Broadway West 4th Avenue Fraser Dunbar Kingsway and Hastings can be defined by the presence of Independents and Chains These segments are often located in neighbourhoods with some of the strongest urban identities in the City This short series of studies in Independents and Chain Coffee and Teahouses in the City of Vancouver occurs in the intersection of community and commerce As third spaces a space that is neither work or home cafes and coffee shops have always had role in the life of the City Indeed coffee and tea houses have been remarkable institutions in the urban landscape where events like the French Revolution first brewed in the coffeehouses of Paris Forward to Vancouver today coffee and tea houses in Vancouver have multiple roles in the City as they can serve as both conveners and indicators for a neighborhood where coffee or tea serves as a social lubricant or in certain professions a caffeinated overlord Where some readers in the Twitterverse have observed how these spaces bring together and connect nascent communities others have suggested that certain types of Independents and Chains are heralds of gentrification and displacement as not everyone in Vancouver can afford a 3 dollar cup of coffee These tensions reflect the ongoing and bigger concerns about and direction of the urban economic social and cultural development of City of Vancouver One interesting land use planning experiment would be the allowance of neighbourhood cafes particularly for Independents with certain operating parameters in Vancouver s residential neighborhoods as opposed to just being located on major transportation corridors or arterials Such a phenomenon is not without precedences given the City s long history of neighborhood corner stores In the rise of the corner or even laneway cafe there lies an opportunity to further strengthen a neighborhood s social fabric while incrementally introducing a mixed use community based local economy to these residential neighbourhoods Neighborhoods like Kitsilano and Strathcona already have prototypical examples of this type of land use with specific store types like Le Marche St George in Ridley Park and the Wilder Snail in Strathcona In a city where connection and loneliness is a growing concern this might be one community based commercial opportunity to get to know one s neighbours Beyond spaces of consumption it is worth talking about coffee and tea houses as emerging places of production An article entitled Laptopistan in the New York Times explored how cafes have become extensions of the new workplace Ideas and connections steep while people talk around a cup of coffee or contemplate on a laptop with a pot of tea which propel parts of the economy In and of themselves both independent and chain coffee and tea houses are small parts of the City s overall economy but as Tom Standage observes in his 2005 book A History of the World in Six Glasses coffee and tea and the social act of bringing people together can have powerful results However it remains an unwritten chapter whether these ideas and industries brewing coffee and tea houses of Vancouver can scale to the numbers of employment with accompanying wages that are needed to support a sustainable livable and just city Technical Notes On a technical level the difficulty in capturing independent cafes and tea shops begins with the fact that they can span five difference business license types in the City s license database Limited Service Food Establishment Restaurant Class 1 and Retail dealer Food Wholesale Dealer Food and Manufacturer Food with Ancillary Retail Between general selection parameters of coffee cafe and tea within these business license types a earlier coffee shop study on the Yelp website and participant observer field research the study was able to obtain study universe Further filtering occurred with cross referencing the Yelp study and Google searches to exclude full service restaurants It is important to note the number of full service Southeast Asian Vietnamese restaurants that have the word cafe in their Business Trade Name of which were excluded in this study There is a certain level of subjectivity in this study as it excludes most full service restaurants but does include bakery cafes and general merchandise shops where a Google search suggests that retail coffee tea hot beverage services are a major part of everyday business Stemming from comments from the earlier Kerry Gold piece on the BTAworks major coffee chain analysis citizens in this town hold deep passions for their local independent caffeine outlets far more than the 186 chain outlets Indeed one reader mentions how this hot beverage means community in a coffee cup Readers quickly volunteered neighborhood shops and cafes to this list and hopefully this piece captures the wide diversity of Independents in the City of Vancouver If this list has somehow missed your favorite independent coffee tea spot please feel free to email any omissions to the BTAworks hotline email info at btaworks com Their omission was strictly accidental Data Desk Observations Research Papers April 27 2013 The Density and Flow of Major Coffee Chains in the City of Vancouver With this interactive Coffee map please feel free to use the upper left hand buttons to see a map legend and turn a population density layer on and off Whether it is served hot to counter Vancouver s cold wet winters or enjoyed iced in the City s far too short summers coffee is one liquid aspect of culture in the City of Vancouver As a city cultural artifact BTAworks wanted to explore the patterns of coffee bars and houses in the City of Vancouver One little known piece of global coffee trivia is that the first Starbucks to open outside of the United States and in Canada was at the Seabus Skytrain Station on March 1 1987 As known as the Waterfront Station and the former Pacific Terminus for the Canadian Pacific Railway it is one of the principle intermodal transportation hubs for the Metro Vancouver region Using business license data from the City of Vancouver s Open Data catalogue BTAworks mined analyzed and mapped the locations of the major coffee chains in the City We are reserving an analysis of Vancouver vibrant independent coffee scene for a future time given the difficulties of sculpting out that data however a quick Yelp query suggests that there are over 82 independent coffeehouses and bars around the City We will also be including the City s many Bubble Tea houses in this analysis A quick unsponsored acknowledgement to Matchstick Coffee Roasters and Room for Cream on Kingsway Abruzzo on Commercial 49th Parallel on 4th Avenue and Main Street the Wired Monk on 4th Avenue Our Town on Broadway the Grind Cafe and Gallery on Main and the Wilder Snail in Strathcona for the forthcoming analysis and to preserve some semblance of indie cred At Bing Thom Architects we have a particular affinity to the Musette Caffe located just a few blocks from our offices First the major coffee chain census At 85 retail outlets Starbucks is by far the largest coffee chain in the City of Vancouver Followed by Tim Horton s 26 Blenz 26 JJ Bean 11 and Bean Around the World and Waves at 10 outlets Take 5 at 8 and Cafe Artigiano at 7 round out the major coffee chains in the City of Vancouver Interestingly when compared to the City of Surrey s business license database there are contrasts in coffee communities Where Vancouver has 85 Starbucks the City of Surrey has 18 outlets however the City of Surrey has 22 Tim Horton s while Vancouver has 26 Tim s Major coffee chains seem to follow a spatial pattern related to population and employment density and commuter and transportation flow in the City In short major coffee chains go where the people and the jobs are and where the people go through In certain parts of Downtown Vancouver and Broadway corridor there really is a Starbucks on every corner as the core is inundated with coffee chains However as one goes into the neighborhoods outside of Vancouver s downtown core chains take a much more opportunistic position often locating at primary commuting hubs like the Broadway Street Skytrain Station or transportation corridors like Hastings or Granville Street One can observe these relationships between major coffee chains and population densities on the map by adding a population density layer to the locations of these chains On Commercial Drive the street that arguably started Vancouver s coffee culture with its collection of independent Italian coffee bars the coffee chains have located on the commuting nexuses of Commercial and 1st and Broadway and Commercial In outer and less dense single family neighborhoods of the City of Vancouver there are even fewer chains and where they do appear they are on major arterial Of course this is also a function of land use zoning as retail and commercial outlets are restricted to the high streets of these neighborhoods In this capacity it brings a discussion of whether Starbucks and other coffee chains are trend setters or density and or flow indicators Does a community appear first and then a coffee chain moves in or does a coffee chain move in to become part of a package of amenities that attracts residents to a neighborhood With these maps they suggest that chains move to density as oppose to create them It would be curious to see what BTAworks readers think UPDATE A special thank you to the Globe and Mail s Kerry Gold for an article on this piece You can read her article here To build a neighbourhood it takes a good coffee shop Data Desk April 9 2013 Non Resident Occupancy Dwelling Units in Communities across British Columbia While earlier BTAworks non resident occupied dwelling studies have focused on the City of Vancouver this entry focused on the prevalence of these types of units in other communities in British Columbia After all at 115 square kilometers 44 square miles the City of Vancouver represents only 0 01 percent of the land mass of British Columbia Using the same 2011 Census methodology as those in the Foreign Investment in Vancouver Real Estate the following are rankings by percentage and number of non resident occupied units in BC communities that had more than 25 000 residents or more in 2011 Non Resident Occupancy is defined as a regular private dwelling unit that is either unoccupied or occupied solely by foreign residents and or temporarily present residents on the Census reference day May 10 2011 While the municipalities of Squamish pop 17 158 and Whistler 9 824 fell under this population threshold they have been included in these tables just out of general interest On this province wide scale it is also an opportunity to examine the phenomenon of Whistlerization Named after the Resort Municipality of Whistler the term is often used to describe an economic situation where a town or city becomes heavily dependent and defined by the hospitality and tourism sectors and caters predominantly to temporary visitors and tourist at the real or perceived economic social and or cultural cost of local year round residents To this extent Whistlerization is a BC born reference to resortification While other studies may use employment base in the hospitality and retail sectors as an economic indicator of Whistlerization this blog entry suggests that non resident occupancy may be another socioeconomic indicator In Whistler 58 percent of all regular private dwelling units were non resident occupied To place this number in context the census tract with the highest percentage of non resident occupancy in the City of Vancouver was a census tract in the Coal Harbour neighborhood at 23 5 percent With a total number of 5 339 non resident occupied units in Whistler it is just behind the cities of Vancouver and Surrey in total number of these types of units It is worthwhile to mention that the total housing stock of the cities of Vancouver 286 742 dwellings and Surrey 163 986 dwellings are 31 times and 18 times bigger than Whistler 9 239 dwellings Given these statistics for Whistler it is important to recognize the remarkable and innovative affordable and workforce housing initiatives that the municipality via the Whistler Housing Authority is undertaking to house the full time residents and workers in the municipality Data Desk Media Observations Research Papers April 4 2013 Media and Metrics Accounts of the Foreign Investment in Vancouver s Real Estate Panel A Collection of Headlines from the SFU Woodwards event As part of making a teaching moment of media coverage of the SFU Woodwards panel here is a list of the various media stories on the Foreign Investment in Vancouver Real Estate presentation at SFU Woodwards With 23 stories these headlines highlight the best the worst and the sensational of which prompted the publication of our recent clarification entry Over the last two weeks the English and Chinese print television and web publications as well as a number of local blogs and all their commentators provide some interesting insights into the issue of investment in Vancouver real estate For any aspiring Marshall McLuhan s out there it would be interesting to hear about your take on the subject of media and real estate through these articles Special thanks to Heather Amos at UBC Public Affairs for collecting most of these media entries Some final entries June 2013 Real Estate Weekly Foreign Investment in Vancouver Real Estate Vancouver Sun Vancouver urban planner works to prevent a zombie city Print Globe and Mail Vancouver s vacancies point to investors not residents Also appeared in BNN Nearly one in four Vancouver condos empty Metro Vancouver Up to a quarter of Coal Harbour condos sitting empty or foreign owned The Province 15 of downtown Vancouver condos sit empty turning areas into ghost towns Study Vancouver Sun How can we debate foreign ownership if governments don t collect the facts Globe and Mail April 12 2013 It s a problem when Vancouver condos sell but the lights stay off Television CTV BC Anybody home Posh Vancouver neighbourhood rife with vacancies CBC Many Vancouver condos are sitting empty Global BC Large number of absentee condo owners A corollary from Global BC Homes sitting empty as well as condos Radio News 1130 Large number of Vancouver condos sit empty Report Web Publications Huffington Post Vancouver Empty Condos Underscore Investor Speculations The Tyee Vancouver foreign investment panel tackles safety deposit condos for wealthy Vancouver Observer Foreign investment in real estate market resulting in empty condos panel told Yahoo Canada Nearly a quarter of Vancouver s condos are empty but Gen Y still can t afford to buy in Chinese Media Sing Tao Vancouver World Journal Commentary Gary Mason Globe and Mail The great unoccupied condo scandal Get over it with observations and responses from the Vancouver Real Estate Anecdote Blog Geoff Meggs Is there really an empty condo problem And if so anything to be done about it Bob Ransford Vancouver Sun Facts not rhetoric needed on housing supply affordability The Blogosphere The Thirties Grind Vancouver real estate do we have a foreign investment problem or just an investment problem The Mainlander Empty Condos and foreign investors Sign of the times or synonyms for racism Frances Bula The city of empty condos New census number crunching shows high numbers of condos are empty or occupied only by temporary visitors Vancouver Real Estate Anecdotes For A City To Have That Kind Of Vacancy It s Like Cancer Downtown the vacant unit rate is so high that it s as though there were 35 towers at 20 storeys apiece all empty Vancouver Condo Info Have we built too many condos Data Desk Media Observations March 25 2013 Measuring the Presence of Absence Clarifications and Corrections in the Reportage of the BTAworks Foreign Investment in Vancouver Real Estate Over the past few days media coverage on the SFU Woodwards panel on the Foreign Investment in Vancouver Real Estate has been well intense Covering a spectrum from confirming the triumphs of high density and high amenity Downtown urbanism to affirming the tropes of an increasingly unaffordable and alienating global resort city these reports reflect the concerns and passions of those who call Vancouver home and their views about the present and future direction of the City Unfortunately in certain instances these stories highlight the need for more cross training

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/category/datadesk/page/3/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » Surrey_central_library_and_skytrain
    Metro Vancouver Surrey central library and skytrain This entry was posted on Wednesday March 18th 2015 at 2 01 am and is filed under You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2 0 feed Both comments

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2015/03/18/one-step-back-and-one-vote-to-go-forward-numbers-and-design-for-transit-in-metro-vancouver/surrey_central_library_and_skytrain/ (2016-04-28)
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