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  • BT | A | Works » Media
    is Vancouver Real Estate So Expensive A three part series by Don Cayo in the Vancouver Sun with interviews from BTAworks Data Desk Media Observations Research Papers March 31 2010 Climate Change and the City of Vancouver The Georgia Straight recently published on cover article on BTAworks upcoming atlas and toolkit on the Neighborhood Effects of Global Climate Change Click here to read the article Watch this blog for Part One of the publication Media September 23 2009 Families are being priced out of Vancouver study shows Don Cayo s coverage in the Vancouver Sun of BTAworks Downtown empty condo and condo ownership study with elementary school enrollment study in the City of Vancouer Media May 24 2009 Empty condos not the problem downtown it s lack of room for families The BTAworks Empty Condo study on Frances Bula s blog and Gordon Price s blog with some interesting readers comments NEWER ENTRIES RSS Subscribe ARTICLE CATEGORIES ALL 72 Data Desk 47 Research Papers 33 Observations 37 A Look Back 8 Media 25 Public Programming 7 Search Bing Thom Architects BTArchitects Join the conversation Data Desk March 21 2013 BTAworks Foreign Investment in Vancouver Real Estate Slide Presentation at SFU

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/category/media/page/3/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » DSC_4903
    of Vancouver DSC 4903 This entry was posted on Thursday January 21st 2016 at 8 55 pm and is filed under You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2 0 feed Both comments and pings are

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2016/01/20/rising-tides-and-city-building-the-btaworks-climate-change-gauge-the-museum-of-vancouver/dsc_4903/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works
    s far too short summers coffee is one liquid aspect of culture in the City of Vancouver As a city cultural artifact BTAworks wanted to explore the patterns of coffee bars and houses in the City of Vancouver One little known piece of global coffee trivia is that the first Starbucks to open outside of the United States and in Canada was at the Seabus Skytrain Station on March 1 1987 As known as the Waterfront Station and the former Pacific Terminus for the Canadian Pacific Railway it is one of the principle intermodal transportation hubs for the Metro Vancouver region Using business license data from the City of Vancouver s Open Data catalogue BTAworks mined analyzed and mapped the locations of the major coffee chains in the City We are reserving an analysis of Vancouver vibrant independent coffee scene for a future time given the difficulties of sculpting out that data however a quick Yelp query suggests that there are over 82 independent coffeehouses and bars around the City We will also be including the City s many Bubble Tea houses in this analysis A quick unsponsored acknowledgement to Matchstick Coffee Roasters and Room for Cream on Kingsway Abruzzo on Commercial 49th Parallel on 4th Avenue and Main Street the Wired Monk on 4th Avenue Our Town on Broadway the Grind Cafe and Gallery on Main and the Wilder Snail in Strathcona for the forthcoming analysis and to preserve some semblance of indie cred At Bing Thom Architects we have a particular affinity to the Musette Caffe located just a few blocks from our offices First the major coffee chain census At 85 retail outlets Starbucks is by far the largest coffee chain in the City of Vancouver Followed by Tim Horton s 26 Blenz 26 JJ Bean 11 and Bean Around the World and Waves at 10 outlets Take 5 at 8 and Cafe Artigiano at 7 round out the major coffee chains in the City of Vancouver Interestingly when compared to the City of Surrey s business license database there are contrasts in coffee communities Where Vancouver has 85 Starbucks the City of Surrey has 18 outlets however the City of Surrey has 22 Tim Horton s while Vancouver has 26 Tim s Major coffee chains seem to follow a spatial pattern related to population and employment density and commuter and transportation flow in the City In short major coffee chains go where the people and the jobs are and where the people go through In certain parts of Downtown Vancouver and Broadway corridor there really is a Starbucks on every corner as the core is inundated with coffee chains However as one goes into the neighborhoods outside of Vancouver s downtown core chains take a much more opportunistic position often locating at primary commuting hubs like the Broadway Street Skytrain Station or transportation corridors like Hastings or Granville Street One can observe these relationships between major coffee chains and population densities on the map by adding a population density layer to the locations of these chains On Commercial Drive the street that arguably started Vancouver s coffee culture with its collection of independent Italian coffee bars the coffee chains have located on the commuting nexuses of Commercial and 1st and Broadway and Commercial In outer and less dense single family neighborhoods of the City of Vancouver there are even fewer chains and where they do appear they are on major arterial Of course this is also a function of land use zoning as retail and commercial outlets are restricted to the high streets of these neighborhoods In this capacity it brings a discussion of whether Starbucks and other coffee chains are trend setters or density and or flow indicators Does a community appear first and then a coffee chain moves in or does a coffee chain move in to become part of a package of amenities that attracts residents to a neighborhood With these maps they suggest that chains move to density as oppose to create them It would be curious to see what BTAworks readers think UPDATE A special thank you to the Globe and Mail s Kerry Gold for an article on this piece You can read her article here To build a neighbourhood it takes a good coffee shop Data Desk April 9 2013 Non Resident Occupancy Dwelling Units in Communities across British Columbia While earlier BTAworks non resident occupied dwelling studies have focused on the City of Vancouver this entry focused on the prevalence of these types of units in other communities in British Columbia After all at 115 square kilometers 44 square miles the City of Vancouver represents only 0 01 percent of the land mass of British Columbia Using the same 2011 Census methodology as those in the Foreign Investment in Vancouver Real Estate the following are rankings by percentage and number of non resident occupied units in BC communities that had more than 25 000 residents or more in 2011 Non Resident Occupancy is defined as a regular private dwelling unit that is either unoccupied or occupied solely by foreign residents and or temporarily present residents on the Census reference day May 10 2011 While the municipalities of Squamish pop 17 158 and Whistler 9 824 fell under this population threshold they have been included in these tables just out of general interest On this province wide scale it is also an opportunity to examine the phenomenon of Whistlerization Named after the Resort Municipality of Whistler the term is often used to describe an economic situation where a town or city becomes heavily dependent and defined by the hospitality and tourism sectors and caters predominantly to temporary visitors and tourist at the real or perceived economic social and or cultural cost of local year round residents To this extent Whistlerization is a BC born reference to resortification While other studies may use employment base in the hospitality and retail sectors as an economic indicator of Whistlerization this blog entry suggests that non resident occupancy may be another socioeconomic indicator In Whistler 58 percent of all regular private dwelling units were non resident occupied To place this number in context the census tract with the highest percentage of non resident occupancy in the City of Vancouver was a census tract in the Coal Harbour neighborhood at 23 5 percent With a total number of 5 339 non resident occupied units in Whistler it is just behind the cities of Vancouver and Surrey in total number of these types of units It is worthwhile to mention that the total housing stock of the cities of Vancouver 286 742 dwellings and Surrey 163 986 dwellings are 31 times and 18 times bigger than Whistler 9 239 dwellings Given these statistics for Whistler it is important to recognize the remarkable and innovative affordable and workforce housing initiatives that the municipality via the Whistler Housing Authority is undertaking to house the full time residents and workers in the municipality Data Desk Media Observations Research Papers April 4 2013 Media and Metrics Accounts of the Foreign Investment in Vancouver s Real Estate Panel A Collection of Headlines from the SFU Woodwards event As part of making a teaching moment of media coverage of the SFU Woodwards panel here is a list of the various media stories on the Foreign Investment in Vancouver Real Estate presentation at SFU Woodwards With 23 stories these headlines highlight the best the worst and the sensational of which prompted the publication of our recent clarification entry Over the last two weeks the English and Chinese print television and web publications as well as a number of local blogs and all their commentators provide some interesting insights into the issue of investment in Vancouver real estate For any aspiring Marshall McLuhan s out there it would be interesting to hear about your take on the subject of media and real estate through these articles Special thanks to Heather Amos at UBC Public Affairs for collecting most of these media entries Some final entries June 2013 Real Estate Weekly Foreign Investment in Vancouver Real Estate Vancouver Sun Vancouver urban planner works to prevent a zombie city Print Globe and Mail Vancouver s vacancies point to investors not residents Also appeared in BNN Nearly one in four Vancouver condos empty Metro Vancouver Up to a quarter of Coal Harbour condos sitting empty or foreign owned The Province 15 of downtown Vancouver condos sit empty turning areas into ghost towns Study Vancouver Sun How can we debate foreign ownership if governments don t collect the facts Globe and Mail April 12 2013 It s a problem when Vancouver condos sell but the lights stay off Television CTV BC Anybody home Posh Vancouver neighbourhood rife with vacancies CBC Many Vancouver condos are sitting empty Global BC Large number of absentee condo owners A corollary from Global BC Homes sitting empty as well as condos Radio News 1130 Large number of Vancouver condos sit empty Report Web Publications Huffington Post Vancouver Empty Condos Underscore Investor Speculations The Tyee Vancouver foreign investment panel tackles safety deposit condos for wealthy Vancouver Observer Foreign investment in real estate market resulting in empty condos panel told Yahoo Canada Nearly a quarter of Vancouver s condos are empty but Gen Y still can t afford to buy in Chinese Media Sing Tao Vancouver World Journal Commentary Gary Mason Globe and Mail The great unoccupied condo scandal Get over it with observations and responses from the Vancouver Real Estate Anecdote Blog Geoff Meggs Is there really an empty condo problem And if so anything to be done about it Bob Ransford Vancouver Sun Facts not rhetoric needed on housing supply affordability The Blogosphere The Thirties Grind Vancouver real estate do we have a foreign investment problem or just an investment problem The Mainlander Empty Condos and foreign investors Sign of the times or synonyms for racism Frances Bula The city of empty condos New census number crunching shows high numbers of condos are empty or occupied only by temporary visitors Vancouver Real Estate Anecdotes For A City To Have That Kind Of Vacancy It s Like Cancer Downtown the vacant unit rate is so high that it s as though there were 35 towers at 20 storeys apiece all empty Vancouver Condo Info Have we built too many condos Data Desk Media Observations March 25 2013 Measuring the Presence of Absence Clarifications and Corrections in the Reportage of the BTAworks Foreign Investment in Vancouver Real Estate Over the past few days media coverage on the SFU Woodwards panel on the Foreign Investment in Vancouver Real Estate has been well intense Covering a spectrum from confirming the triumphs of high density and high amenity Downtown urbanism to affirming the tropes of an increasingly unaffordable and alienating global resort city these reports reflect the concerns and passions of those who call Vancouver home and their views about the present and future direction of the City Unfortunately in certain instances these stories highlight the need for more cross training between professions as planners ought to take courses in media relations and communications and some journalists could learn about the complexities of presenting social and urban statistics and its limitations To this end this blog entry will try to clarify some of the more egregious statements attributed to the panel Where myth busting was part of the intent of the panel this entry engages meme crushing its 21 st Century social media equivalent Complex urban issues often do not nicely fit into a 140 character Twitter news world Here are some clarifications 1 Data Origins of the New Study The Non Resident Occupancy method used to create a new Empty Condo estimate utilized a Statistics Canada 2011 Census definition of a regular private dwelling unit that was either unoccupied or occupied solely by foreign residents and or temporary present residents on the Census reference day May 10 2011 This combination was chosen as data that breaks out these two categories from Statistics Canada was not freely available and would require an custom tabulation of the 2011 data at considerable expense Hence the use of the term non resident occupancy as opposed to just unoccupied We wanted to recognize the data did blend occupied solely by foreign residents and or temporary present residents into this category Moreover our study is based upon the 2011 Census dwelling counts and may not necessarily directly correspond with other private or public housing real estate unit databases 2 All Condos in the City of Vancouver are NOT 25 percent empty The presentation did not make a statement that condos in the entire City of Vancouver were 25 percent were empty The presentation examined a universe of private regular dwelling units the formal Census definition and did not breakdown typology It was properly reported that nearly a quarter of condos in Vancouver are empty or occupied by non residents in some dense areas of downtown Indeed 22 8 percent of dwelling units in the Coal Harbour census tract were non resident occupied However one cannot extend this percentage to the state of housing occupancy in the City of Vancouver The overall pattern for Downtown Vancouver as defined by the BTAworks Powerpoint slide deck was 14 9 or 5 710 units and is compared to 7 7 for overall Citywide and 6 1 for Metro Vancouver wide patterns Where 93 of dwelling structures are Apartment buildings greater than 5 stories in Downtown Vancouver it is important to note that the dwelling stock greatly diversifies as one exits Downtown Vancouver into a number of other structural types such as single detached houses and duplexes 3 Non resident occupied does NOT equal to why The reasons why these dwellings are non resident occupied can be diverse From investment properties to seasonal homes to being in between tenants or owners to being under renovation there is a vast array of reasons why a unit could be non resident occupied Among other reasons as urban writer France Bula identifies in a recent article on Vancouver s economy is an increasingly substantial professional services workforce in Vancouver that is travelling all over the world and was perhaps away on Census Day 2011 However one interesting aspect of the why question occurs to why there are such a large concentrations of non resident occupied units in Downtown Vancouver compared to other areas of the Metro Vancouver region Non resident occupancy is not necessarily the result of high density as they are very weakly correlated For those who are interested this relationship has an R value of 19 when population density per square kilometre and number of non resident occupied units on a census tract level are fed into a correlation equation Perhaps the varying localized and regional patterns of non resident occupied dwellings across the City of Vancouver and Metro Vancouver are subjects of a future talk 4 Non resident occupied does NOT equate to foreign A major theme throughout presentation was that foreign is a very difficult concept to measure from the data sets that BTAworks has used in its condo studies Sources such as BC Assessment Home Owner Grants BC Hydro and Census data do not directly identify the citizenship status of property owners Moreover when a BC Assessment ticket is sent abroad to another country it is not known that it is being received by a foreign national or a Canadian living in that country wanting to keep a piece of property in Vancouver It is troubling that the popular press and the blogosphere is automatically attributing foreign to investment ownership While through other methods and data sources we strongly believe that many Downtown condos are investor owned non owner occupied However there is no simple and direct method of determining whether this investment is held by a Canadian or not The nationalities citizenship status of these investors is not readily known through these data sets 5 Non resident occupied unit does NOT necessarily suggest a market availability status An unit that was non resident occupied will not necessary be listed for sale or available for rent 6 There are obviously NOT 35 20 storey empty buildings in Downtown Vancouver Instead non resident occupied units were spread throughout Downtown Vancouver and dozens of buildings However one has to keep in mind that various metrics often use this writing device to convey the magnitude of a phenomenon such as x many times stretching to the moon or x many times circulating the world to convey the magnitude of a factory s productive capacity 7 A minor point occurs with my credentials I am a senior planner with Bing Thom Architects BTA and a researcher with BTAworks the firm s research and development division I am also an ADJUNCT professor at the University of British Columbia s School of Community and Regional Planning SCARP an honour that SCARP has bestowed up me To this point BTA has had the pleasure of hosting two cycles of the SCARP Planning 548V Course the Vancouver Planning Laboratory at our Burrard Street studios In these classes we have explored various great and infamous ideas affecting City Building from social capital to economic restructuring to climate change as well as the in s and out s of the Planning profession For both the instructors and the students it has been a great experiment on how the profession can be better taught to future generations of urban planners and urban professionals If there are any more questions about the presentation please feel free to contact Andy Yan info at btaworks com Data Desk Media Observations March 21 2013 BTAworks Foreign Investment in Vancouver Real Estate Slide Presentation at SFU Woodwards The Presentation Slidedeck A special thanks to Am Johal Community Engagement Coordinator at SFU Woodwards and Gordon Price Director SFU City Program for the invitation to this panel and to fellow panel members Sandy Garossino and Tsur Somerville for creating an informative dialogue to

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/page/4/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » Non-Resident Occupancy Dwelling Units in Communities across British Columbia
    unoccupied or occupied solely by foreign residents and or temporarily present residents on the Census reference day May 10 2011 While the municipalities of Squamish pop 17 158 and Whistler 9 824 fell under this population threshold they have been included in these tables just out of general interest On this province wide scale it is also an opportunity to examine the phenomenon of Whistlerization Named after the Resort Municipality of Whistler the term is often used to describe an economic situation where a town or city becomes heavily dependent and defined by the hospitality and tourism sectors and caters predominantly to temporary visitors and tourist at the real or perceived economic social and or cultural cost of local year round residents To this extent Whistlerization is a BC born reference to resortification While other studies may use employment base in the hospitality and retail sectors as an economic indicator of Whistlerization this blog entry suggests that non resident occupancy may be another socioeconomic indicator In Whistler 58 percent of all regular private dwelling units were non resident occupied To place this number in context the census tract with the highest percentage of non resident occupancy in the City of Vancouver was a census tract in the Coal Harbour neighborhood at 23 5 percent With a total number of 5 339 non resident occupied units in Whistler it is just behind the cities of Vancouver and Surrey in total number of these types of units It is worthwhile to mention that the total housing stock of the cities of Vancouver 286 742 dwellings and Surrey 163 986 dwellings are 31 times and 18 times bigger than Whistler 9 239 dwellings Given these statistics for Whistler it is important to recognize the remarkable and innovative affordable and workforce housing initiatives that

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2013/04/09/non-resident-occupancy-dwelling-units-in-communities-across-british-columbia/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » Data Desk
    find properties in the City s RS Districts for less than 500 000 all 182 of them which out of the 71 000 study properties which equates to about 0 3 percent of the study base To respect the privacy of individual homeowners we won t publish a map on their specific locations but highlight the characteristics of this population The characteristics include All properties were east of Main Being built between 1905 and 1996 Generally along major arterials or next to mass transit right of ways like the Expo line Valuations for land value far exceeded improvement values which is term that refers to buildings well beyond the overall patterns for the overall SFH population Other details in this map include Overall Patterns 42 percent of overall properties in the study population were over 1 million however as earlier identified this pattern is highly geographically uneven with Main Street and specifically Ontario Street being the principal dividing line with value shifts depending where a property falls either west or east of Ontario Street In one sample block with similar housing stock on either side properties west of Ontario were worth between 100 000 to 300 000 more than their counterparts east of it East of Main Patterns 7 percent of our study parcels east of Main were equal or more than 1 million in the 2011 BC Assessment or conversely 93 percent of our study parcels were under 1 million West of Main Patterns 89 percent of our study parcels west of Main were equal or more than 1 million in the 2011 BC Assessment or conversely 11 percent of parcels were under 1 million This Study in the News An interesting web dialogue has occured with the publication of this map and two subsequent analysis are of particular note one written by Pete McMartin in the Vancouver Sun and another by Gordon Price on his blog Price Tags Thank you Pete and Gordon for sharing your insights on these patterns Data Desk Research Papers December 10 2011 Main Street The City of Vancouver s Million Dollar Line Land zoned for single family housing represents about half of the overall land mass of the City of Vancouver As Vancouver strives to become the Greenest City on Earth this land and activities on it will invariably have a role in determining this outcome In turn its value will help influence what can and cannot occur on it and perhaps just as importantly who can and cannot afford to own it Using data from Vancouver s Open Data Catalogue this map illustrates the property values of single family districts in the City of Vancouver and its distribution For purposes of this map single family homes are defined as all properties that are within the City s RS zoning Interestingly historic neighbourhoods with large amount of single family homes like Strathcona and Shaughnessy do not have a RS zoning but rather a RT 3 and First Shaughnessy District which were established to preserve the architectural heritage in each respective neighborhood Another key note is that with the approval of laneway housing and the legalization of secondary basement suites the traditional notion of a single family homes in Vancouver is changing The property values in this map are derived by the combination of land and improvement assessed values for 2011 released by BC Assessment which in turn were the market value of each element assessed as of July 2010 Through the usage of the ArcGIS Geographic Information Systems platform this map was produced Certain data artifacts were kept and left unedited in this map by purpose There are some data point in Stanley Park along Beach Avenue near Sunset Beach the Kitsilano waterfront and Jericho Beach that fall into an RS 1 zoning The designation of these properties are likely spurious or erroneous zoning and property data that need to be updated or edited within the Open data Dataset rather than development potential and highlight some of the data editing that is required in the usage of some datasets in the Catalogue Before discussing values this first observation of this map begins with the distribution of RS zoning as it largely corresponds with the pre consolidation 1929 boundaries of the municipalities of Point Grey and South Vancouver Prior to 1929 Vancouver consisted of three separate municipalities Point Grey South Vancouver and Vancouver With the exception of a section of Vancouver east of Victoria Drive there is little to no RS zoning within the boundaries of pre 1929 Vancouver Instead RS zoning dominates the former pre 1929 municipalities of Point Grey and South Vancouver Within the distribution of property values a few patterns emerge In the 2011 assessment there were no single family homes in Vancouver that were worth less than 500 000 At the same time the overwhelming majority of homes west of Main were worth over a million dollars Admittedly this line is Ontario Street but Main Street is the closest arterial With some very small pockets of sub 1 000 000 homes in Marpole and minute isolated cases any single family home west of Main Street was worth over a million dollars Conversely homes east of Main Street were largely under 1 000 000 While there were homes over 1 000 000 of which were concentrated in the far southeast corner of the City there was a much more diverse collection of homes under 1 000 000 in areas east of Main Street In all likelihood there will be more homes worth a million dollars in the 2012 Assessment east of Main but one of the surprising patterns in this map is the how strong Main Street remains as delineation between million dollar and non million dollar homes in Vancouver Additional observations and details on this map are now avaliable in this later posting For most of the City of Vancouver s history in the 20 th Century Main Street was a social cultural and political dividing line of wealth social

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/category/datadesk/page/4/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » Foreign Investment in Vancouver’s Real Estate Market Public Event
    are the facts How does foreign investment impact affordability if at all What are other jurisdictions doing What public policy interventions would make sense if any These will be some of the questions discussed by our panel moderated by Tyee editor David Beers Andy Yan BTAWorks Tsur Somerville UBC s Sauder School of Business Sandy Garrosino Independent City Council Candidate Richard Wozny Principal Site Economics Ltd 0 COMMENTS Comments are

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2013/03/02/foreign-investment-in-vancouvers-real-estate-market-public-event/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » Revisiting the Local Effects of Global Climate Change in the City of Vancouver
    revisited this topic On the data front the Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium at the University of Victoria has just published its new regional data analysis tool The tool generates maps plots and data describing projected future climate conditions for the Pacific and Yukon Region It uses an ensemble of more than 15 Global Climate Model GCM and SRES emissions scenario combinations provided by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Expanding our initial research parameters from data visualization and analysis into realm of public policy New York City has published this paper on climate risk information for the Big Apple to inform its long term planning efforts As part of PlaNYC climate change along with topics such as housing parks and public space food and economic opportunity became plan elements for New York City and its vision for the New York of 2030 Of particular interest PlaNYC sets out on a series of Sustainability Indicators to track the progress of its long term goals With public art artist Eve Mosher developed the High Water Line project to show the very real effects of climate change along New York City s urban coastline through an immediate visual and local understanding of the effects of climate chagne Locally some interesting policy and design initiatives around the topic of climate change include the City of Vancouver s Climate Change Action Plan and the public art installation of A False Creek Metro Vancouver is seeking to minimize the region s contribution to global climate change through the adoption of the Integrated Air Quality and Greenhouse Gas Management Plan Between these initiatives they illustrate how local governments and arts in Vancouver are engaging the topic of global climate change in the near and the far future 0 COMMENTS Comments are closed RSS Subscribe ARTICLE CATEGORIES ALL

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2012/08/07/revisiting-the-local-effects-of-global-climate-change-in-the-city-of-vancouver/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » City of Strangers?
    Observer Lonely Town by Kate Zimmerman Calgary Herald 0 COMMENTS Comments are closed RSS Subscribe ARTICLE CATEGORIES ALL 72 Data Desk 47 Research Papers 33 Observations 37 A Look Back 8 Media 25 Public Programming 7 Search Bing Thom Architects BTArchitects Join the conversation Data Desk March 21 2013 BTAworks Foreign Investment in Vancouver Real Estate Slide Presentation at SFU Woodwards The Presentation Slidedeck A special thanks to Am Johal

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2012/03/13/city-of-strangers/ (2016-04-28)
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