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  • BT | A | Works » Demographic Correlations and the Metro Vancouver Transit Plebiscite: What the Results Say About Us
    we performed a basic linear correlation table for the percentage of Yes and No votes with each demographic characteristic A special credit to Metro Vancouver for its very rich data site on the region and its member municipalities Correlation coefficients of above 7 are considered strong correlations 5 to 7 are considered moderate correlations 3 to 5 are a low correlation and 0 to 3 being negligible essentially irrelevant correlations while correlations with a minus sign indicate a negative relationship between variables eg the more of x the less of y A reference guide on correlation coefficients can be found here Moreover the classic statistician disclaimer of correlation is not causation still stands This is also tempered with the caveat that given the small size of dataset 22 municipalities that is currently available observations may change such as if the data points and voter turnout increases from citywide characteristics to census tract levels of observations Education was the variable that was strongly correlated in our study to the Yes or No vote in the referendum The higher a city had in terms of a percentage of population with only a high school education 0 746 the higher the percentage in most cases of a No vote Conversely the cities that had a greater population in percentage terms with university education 0 732 the higher the percentage Yes votes The moderate correlations with a No vote were percentages of residential ownership and residential tax rates Municipalities with high percentages of home ownership 0 608 and high residential property taxation 0 507 had a correlation to a high percentage of No votes For low correlations for a Yes vote municipalities with high percentages of apartments 5 stories or higher 0 420 as part of their housing stock and a workforce reliant on

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2015/07/03/demographic-correlations-and-the-metro-vancouver-transit-plebiscite-what-the-results-say-about-us/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » #GenerationTransit – Workers Reliant on Transit by Generation
    to source but we wanted to keep the analysis to 15 year every increments as per their availability on the National Household Survey This is a survey of workers aged 15 years and older who listed Public Transit as their primary means of traveling to work in 2011 Key results were About 20 percent of all workers in Metro Vancouver listed transit as their major mode of transportation to work Out of all transit reliant workers Millennials 39 are the most transit reliant followed by Generation X ers 32 and Baby Boomers 27 Transit Reliance by Workers varied significantly within each Generation Almost 1 in 3 millennial workers in Metro Vancouver rely on Transit to get to work 1 in 5 Generation X ers rely on Transit to get to work 1 in 10 Baby Boomers rely on Transit to get to work The results were unexpected as generational lines seemed to be very strong There is of course the possibility that the age ranges were too arbitrarily drawn Moreover transit usage may be a stage and related to the age of worker We ll explore this question by examining earlier datasets from the 1996 Census however given the significantly different methodologies between the Census and National Household Survey we will proceed with caution as such as comparison has been called risky by some Nevertheless some transportation planners and researchers have suggested that Millennial usage of transit represents a distinct and possible permanent trends for that generation in the United States and Canada Indeed many professional and journalist articles have focused on this change particularly on Millennials With the impending transit plebiscite in Metro Vancouver it is curious to see how these patterns and trends may affect voting by generation in the region 0 COMMENTS Comments are closed RSS Subscribe

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2015/03/23/generationtransit-workers-reliant-on-transit-by-generation/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » The #Hipsterhomelands of #Vancouver
    starts households and begins its families with children From Hipsters growing into the ranks of the Procreative Class this age range captures important demographic for a City Taken from Statistics Canada s 2011 Census and mapped along dissemination areas the smallest publicly available geographic unit of information in the census we looked at where this population was settling and where it was leaving Surprisingly or not this population is leaving the neighbourhoods of multi million dollar single family homes in the Southwest the area south of Broadway and west of Main Street in favour of neighborhoods centred around the downtown core and Mount Pleasant areas with enclaves on the Eastside of the City While the number of 25 39 year olds in the City of Vancouver were stable between the 2001 and 2011 Censuses this Southwest section of Vancouver saw a 17 decline for age group These settlement decisions reflect the residential choices and tastes of a particular population but also the forces of housing affordability economy and community in the City and Region of Vancouver We re working on a regional version 0 COMMENTS Comments are closed RSS Subscribe ARTICLE CATEGORIES ALL 72 Data Desk 47 Research Papers 33

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2015/03/20/hipsterhomelands-of-vancouver/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » Data Desk
    their coverage The 2015 BTAworks 1 Million Line edition marks the fourth edition of this map Since 2011 we have mapped the change in total assessment values for Vancouver single family properties through data made available on the City of Vancouver s Open Data Catalogue This year s analysis followed in the footsteps of previous maps but the 2015 editions have been based on more edited property assessment value datasets that excludes properties that are classified as single family parcels such as those in parks or right of ways In addition to total assessed values over and under 1 million we have included a breakdown of properties categories in 1 million intervals as well as included an animated gif for both map types It is important to note that assessment values are not necessarily current market values and reflect assessments as of July of the previous year so an assessment value of 2015 was made in July 2014 and 2010 was made in July 2009 Not all property assessments could be traced from the 2015 to 2010 assessments After this data editing the final total data universe was about 68 600 viable properties records To place the changes in assessment values in context inflation adjusted 2010 assessment values were also used Some key observations are There is no longer a distinct 1 million line in the City of Vancouver but rather clusters of sub 1 million Single Family Properties SFP surrounded by a rising tide of 1 million and above SFPs In 2015 66 percent of all Single Family Properties in the City of Vancouver have a total assessment of over 1 million In 2010 when adjusted for inflation 33 percent of all SFPs in the City of Vancouver were assessed at more than 1 million 99 percent of Single Family Properties west of Ontario Street were assessed at over 1 million in 2015 44 percent of Single Family Properties east of Ontario Street are over 1 million in 2015 The number of luxury properties worth over 5 million nearly tripled from 373 in 2010 to 1 282 in 2015 There are no longer any single family properties in the City of Vancouver with total assessments under 500 000 in 2015 Total assessments for all SFPs increased by 11 on the average in the City of Vancouver Out of the City of Vancouver s 20 planning areas South Cambie saw the highest percent increases of 15 followed by a four way tie of Single Family Properties in Kensington Cedar Cottage Mount Pleasant Riley Park and West Point Grey 14 At 8 single family properties in Arbutus Ridge saw the lowest increases Between the 2015 to 2010 Assessment Years the fastest growing value category were homes assessed at between 4 million to 5 million grew by 408 followed by homes between 3 to 4 million by 363 and homes worth more than 5 million which grew by 243 The only value category to decline in number were single family properties under 1 million by 45 Data Desk Media Public Programming Research Papers October 15 2014 Vancouver in the 21st Century THANK YOU A belated thank you to SFU s Vancity Office of Community Engagement SFU Woodwards and the City of Vancouver s City Planning Commission for hosting Vancouver in the 21 st Century With over 250 attendees the event was a great success towards getting citizens to engage in the future social economic and planning issues of the City and its region as well as wonderful fundraiser for the Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House Here s a short list of the media coverage on the event in chronological order as well as the three part series of the City and Regional economic sections of the presentation with Pete McMartin from the Vancouver Sun Jen St Denis September 25 2014 Business in Vancouver Vancouver s huge income to home price gap will continue to challenge city planner Frances Bula September 28 2014 Globe and Mail Study suggests Vancouver mayoral candidates should target super engagers Pete McMartin October 1 2014 Vancouver Sun Lotus Land or Lowest Land Pete McMartin October 4 2014 Vancouver Sun To have expensive houses and have not money Pete McMartin October 6 2014 Vancouver Sun Does Metro have room for a future We have also included a selected slide show presentation from the talk To access the slidedeck click above slide or here To see a video of the full talk and panel on Vancouver in the 21st Century click here Data Desk Research Papers July 28 2014 Visualizing Commute Patterns in Metro Vancouver Using the 2011 National Household Survey this blog entry looks at the flows of workers with fixed workplaces between the 5 largest municipalities of Metro Vancouver and their commutes between their places of residence to places of work by census subdivision commonly equivalent to local municipality While it would have been ideal to show these flows amongst all 21 municipalities one treaty First Nation and one Electoral Area of Metro Vancouver we chose to focus the commute flows of the five largest municipalities of the region by population Vancouver Surrey Richmond Coquitlam and Surrey for the sake of graphical legibility For a fuller breakdown of Metro Vancouver please see Chad Skelton s article on Metro Vancouver commute patterns in the Vancouver Sun and for the original data used in both analyses click this link for the Statistics Canada Commuting Flow data page To graphically illustrate where workers who living in Vancouver Surrey Richmond Coquitlam and Surrey are commuting BTAworks is using a chord diagram generated by Circos a visualization software package developed by Martin Krzywinski at the Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre at the BC Cancer Agency and used to visualize genomic data and molecular biology the above diagram was generated by mashing up Circos with Place of work data from Statistics Canada With these limitations in mind a pattern immediately worth noting is how most workers commute within their municipality of residents Far from a Central City Suburb model of workers living in the suburbs and commuting in Downtown Vancouver the majority or in certain cases pluralities of workers live and work in their municipality of residents For example 68 percent of residents in Vancouver work in Vancouver 46 percent of workers who live Surrey work in Surrey 36 percent of Burnaby residents work in Burnaby 55 percent of residents in Richmond work in Richmond and 24 percent of Coquitlam residents work in Coquitlam For a full explanation on how to read the chart please click here Metro Vancouver is increasingly a region of interdependent as opposed to a dominant central city fed by largely residential suburbs and perhaps a positive indicator of regional growth strategies that over the last 30 years have focused on creating a distributed network of town centres spread throughout the region More analysis on this chart coming soon A special addendum from Andy Coupland City of Vancouver data guru from the perspective of 1971 83 percent of residents in Vancouver work in Vancouver 61 percent of workers who live in Surrey White Rock work in Surrey White Rock 33 percent of Burnaby residents work in Burnaby 44 percent of residents in Richmond work in Richmond and 23 percent of Coquitlam residents work in Coquitlam Data Desk Media Observations July 14 2014 BTAworks in the Economist A screenshot of the Economist article A slightly delayed post but some BTAworks research was featured in this June 2014 posting in the Economist Data Desk Observations Research Papers March 25 2014 All Hands on Deck Building a Resilience Constituency A BTAworks MASNYC Essay Please click the image to start the slidedeck BTAworks recently had the opportunity to collaborate with Mary Rowe the Director of Urban Resilience and Livability of the Municipal Arts Society of New York City In the MAS publication s Ideas for New York s New Leadership it presents a set of essays that talks about a key issue opportunity or priority for action within a specific domain to the new mayor of New York City to stimulate a diverse and inclusive discourse to inform decision making and priority setting Working with Mary Rowe BTAworks looked at the challenge of nurturing a resilience constituency within a vastly complex and diversity metropolis How do we create an urban system that can sustain itself and quickly rebound from shock and stresses In the spirit of BTAworks early work on a toolkit on Climate Change and the City of Vancouver this is a question that is affected cities around the world in terms of sudden and gradual shocks and stresses In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy it highlighted the urgency for New York City to engage this question Using data from NYC OpenData and the Federal Emergency Management Agency BTAworks was able to map and model the effects of another possible 1 percent flood event upon New York City Not surprising flooding would be very uneven through a City like New York as it reflect the local topography and development history of each borough of New York City Moreover using land use and property value spatial datasets available on NYC OpenData we were able to model the possible impacts of another 1 percent flood in terms of land mass demography land mass and property values The above slidedeck are maps and tables that did not make it to publication but we thought might prove to be helpful documents to facilitate an informed dialogue Some key findings of this slidesdeck include Modern Manhattan is profoundly different from the original 1609 shoreline that Henry Hudson had first encounter and has been profoundly shaped and reshaped by human activity An insight talk about these changes can be found in this TED Talk by Eric Sanderson Based up the New FEMA Base Flood Elevations 16 percent 47 Square Miles of New York City is susceptible to being heavily affected by 100 year Hurricane Sandy level flood In total this area is equivalent to 36 Central Parks or the entire land mass of the City of San Francisco By boroughs New York will be unevenly distributed by flooding risk as Queen s at 36 of its land area would be the most heavily affected compared to 8 of Manhattan who which would be the least By square footage one and two family houses are the heavily affected land use type in New York City About 9 percent 325 000 units of the City s housing stock is under the 1 Flood Elevation While the full assessed value of New York City is about 1 trillion the assessed value of properties under a 1 flood elevation is 111 billion In 2012 about 1 3 million people live in an 1 Flood Zone 23 of the total population living under the Flood Elevation is Hispanic compared to 18 of the total NYC patterns In 1983 33 square miles of New York City is in a 100 year floodplain By 2050 and projected effect of climate change 72 square miles of New York City will be in a 100 year flood plain Data Desk Observations Research Papers January 29 2014 Changes in Total Property Assessment Values in the City of Vancouver by Percentage 2013 2014 With the publication of the 2014 BC Assessment property value dataset on the City of Vancouver s Open Data Catalogue BTAworks wanted to extend its annual 1 million line Single Family properties analysis to the entire City of Vancouver and all property types After overcoming a key technical challenge see note below We wanted to explore how the values of Vancouver real estate changes over a single year as each dot on the map represents one single property What s interesting about these value changes may not necessarily be what happens to a single dot but rather a cluster of dots or distinct area of dots in particular neighbourhoods as they reflect changes in public policy real estate market sentiment or simply demand for properties in a particular land use type Citywide the total property value of the City of Vancouver was 283 billion in 2014 which represents an increase of 2 3 percent 6 4 billion from 2013 When broken down by land use types total value changes ranged vastly from an increase of 10 percent for light industrial use to a decrease of 17 percent for limited agricultural uses Light industrial zones saw the highest percentage increases in total values at 10 percent followed by Industrial 7 percent Historic area 6 8 percent and Commercial uses 5 percent While likely the effect of high pre existing total values values in one family dwelling areas only increased by 1 4 percent Please see the accompanying table but note that data points such as transportation right of ways may not be assigned a land use category and are listed as Data Unavailable Nevertheless as BTAworks expands this analysis to a longer time series it will be interesting to see if these value patterns of increases and declines hold for various land use types over time In terms of specific portions of the City of Vancouver properties that saw increases of total values by over 25 percent were clustered on the West End Downtown Eastside and Mount Pleasant area Properties in the inner city light industrial and industrial areas and port areas saw 25 percent or more increases in total values Strips of properties along Kingsway Main Street areas around Granville and Arbutus Street also saw major increases in property values Interestingly most properties in Vancouver s Single Family Home districts saw relatively flat patterns and in certain cases declines It would be interesting to explore the causes of these patterns but it is important to note that give the rapid ascent of the Single Family properties values in the City of Vancouver value shifts up or down could reflect the inertia of already high property values While this analysis will not examine the particular reasons why specific areas saw value increases or decreases these light industrial areas are of particular concern as they are often cited as the nursery for new firms and economic employment activities on a regional and citywide level but at the same time offer parcel assemblages that are attractive for new multi family residential development in terms of size and relative ease of acquisition to other land use types and land divisions While there are ongoing initiatives to preserve and retain employment lands within the City of Vancouver and Metro Vancouver region it remains unclear if these large value shifts in light industrial land uses in such a short time will have an upward pressure for existing tenants on the lands and their rents or arrest or even prevent the emergence of the next economic dynamo for the Region With increased industrial land values there is an opportunity to intensify industrial uses on these lands but also the danger to displace major current and future economic and employment drivers and prospects for the City and Region Technical Notes It has been an ongoing BTAworks project over the years of the 1 million line Single Family property mapping to document the total values and value changes for all properties in the City of Vancouver However the challenge has always been to how to best illustrate and account for strata properties such as condominiums Single family homes are relatively simple to represent as they have a one to one relationship to a dot however when it comes to strata properties one dot can represent dozens if not hundreds of records a One to Many relationship Without accounting for this Many to One relationship a direct matching of BC Assessment records to City of Vancouver GIS files could inadvertently only document the common areas of the near4 300 strata properties 108 000 units as oppose to the actual price dynamics with each strata property While most stratas are residential in nature it is important to note that commercial and retail stratas also exist After several years of periodic concentration this analysis pre processes the 2014 BC assessment database to create a single data point for each strata parcel Prices changes for these strata data points is an average of all total value changes of records for a particular strata property This is a pragmatic mapping solution to address this many to one data record dilemma but is much more precise than a possible inadvertent map of the values changes for strata condo areas Please note that like our previous 1 million single family home analysis we have focused on total value that is the value of both the land and improvement typically a building on it Moreover due to long standing BC Assessment Authority methodologies values in this analysis reflect the market value of a particular property in July of the previous year For example 2014 values reflect assessments made in July 2013 and 2013 values represent ones from July 2012 Another important note to acknowledge is that the analysis in this entry is based upon an unedited version of the Property tax report data available on the Vancouver Open Data Catalogue obtained in January 2013 Revisions of the tabular data may occur as the database is revised to account and or exclude data artifacts and landuse miscodes in later versions as they are discovered in later versions Data Desk Observations Research Papers January 25 2014 The Freezing of Vancouver s One Million Dollar Line Please note that these figures may be revised as the Open Data database that used in this study is refined to excluded properties like schools parks and right of ways that may have been invertantly classed as Single Family Homes in the original database AY Sept 2014 Key Findings Between 2013 to 2014 the number of single family homes in the City of Vancouver assessed at 1 million line or more has effectively remained unchanged There were 37 800 SF properties worth over 1 million in 2014 compared to 37 410 SF

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/category/datadesk/page/2/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » A Step Back and One Vote to Go Forward: Numbers and Design for Transit in Metro Vancouver
    above the Canadian average of 13 This is light years ahead of every metropolitan region on the Pacific Coast from Seattle 8 to Portland 7 to San Francisco 15 to Los Angeles 6 to San Diego 3 Calgary by the way is 16 If we were to slip to Calgary levels Metro Vancouver would need to accommodate another 117 000 drivers on the road imagine the new roads and bridges we would need for that Who is reliant on transit is just as important as how many Over 210 000 Metro Vancouverites have decided to take transit to work instead of driving This is slight smaller than the entire population of Burnaby 223 000 in 2012 that moves daily by transit to work everyday Divided by gender the majority 60 of workers who take transit to work are women Divided by age 60 of these workers are under the age of 40 While a third are either in the retail trade or business services overall transit riders are spread through every facet of our economy An effective transit network is critically important for connecting low income workers to their jobs and about 54 of transit reliant workers have total incomes of less than 30 000 a year Slightly over 25 of these workers make over 50 000 A robust public transportation system that connects the region is one of the most important economic and social development tools we have For all workers an efficient and robust public transportation system connects workers to their workplaces for those who choose to not to drive and those who cannot afford to drive As a region we have done the right thing by offer workers viable alternatives to the car and need to continue to building this infrastructure to the new communities around Metro Vancouver What is often missed is how big the Tranlink service area is intrusted to serve the Translink service area is bigger than the systems found in Chicago Montreal and Toronto While transit in the region is not perfect Rush Reports reminded twice a day for five days a week on the television and radio about the inadequacies of a car dependent region The Metro Vancouver region is more interdependent than ever before For example more workers who live in Surrey now go to jobs within Surrey than commute between Surrey and Vancouver The municipalities surrounding Vancouver have the most to lose in a No vote where they ve seen tremendous amounts of growth in a very short amount of time growth that is straining the aging transportation infrastructure and in places where there is no alternative but a car today From an architectural perspective a well thought transit system is the foundation of a sustainable city Over 10 years ago a decision was made to locate a new university campus adjacent to a transit exchange in suburban Surrey Students are significant users of transit with low incomes and very limited choices to drive Today at SFU Surrey over 80

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2015/03/18/one-step-back-and-one-vote-to-go-forward-numbers-and-design-for-transit-in-metro-vancouver/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » chicago
    Transit in Metro Vancouver chicago This entry was posted on Wednesday March 18th 2015 at 3 32 am and is filed under You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2 0 feed Both comments and pings

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2015/03/18/one-step-back-and-one-vote-to-go-forward-numbers-and-design-for-transit-in-metro-vancouver/chicago/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » montreal
    Transit in Metro Vancouver montreal This entry was posted on Wednesday March 18th 2015 at 3 32 am and is filed under You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2 0 feed Both comments and pings

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2015/03/18/one-step-back-and-one-vote-to-go-forward-numbers-and-design-for-transit-in-metro-vancouver/montreal/ (2016-04-28)
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  • BT | A | Works » toronto
    Transit in Metro Vancouver toronto This entry was posted on Wednesday March 18th 2015 at 3 32 am and is filed under You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2 0 feed Both comments and pings

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2015/03/18/one-step-back-and-one-vote-to-go-forward-numbers-and-design-for-transit-in-metro-vancouver/toronto/ (2016-04-28)
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