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  • BT | A | Works » All Hands on Deck: Building a Resilience Constituency – A BTAworks+MASNYC Essay
    data from NYC OpenData and the Federal Emergency Management Agency BTAworks was able to map and model the effects of another possible 1 percent flood event upon New York City Not surprising flooding would be very uneven through a City like New York as it reflect the local topography and development history of each borough of New York City Moreover using land use and property value spatial datasets available on NYC OpenData we were able to model the possible impacts of another 1 percent flood in terms of land mass demography land mass and property values The above slidedeck are maps and tables that did not make it to publication but we thought might prove to be helpful documents to facilitate an informed dialogue Some key findings of this slidesdeck include Modern Manhattan is profoundly different from the original 1609 shoreline that Henry Hudson had first encounter and has been profoundly shaped and reshaped by human activity An insight talk about these changes can be found in this TED Talk by Eric Sanderson Based up the New FEMA Base Flood Elevations 16 percent 47 Square Miles of New York City is susceptible to being heavily affected by 100 year Hurricane Sandy level flood In total this area is equivalent to 36 Central Parks or the entire land mass of the City of San Francisco By boroughs New York will be unevenly distributed by flooding risk as Queen s at 36 of its land area would be the most heavily affected compared to 8 of Manhattan who which would be the least By square footage one and two family houses are the heavily affected land use type in New York City About 9 percent 325 000 units of the City s housing stock is under the 1 Flood Elevation While the

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  • BT | A | Works » Observations
    and Richards West 4th and Dunbar and Commercial Drive and East 2th as well as along certain corridors like Broadway as well as a cluster of Chinese language bookstores in Chinatown and specifically along Keefer Over 50 percent of bookstores are located in just four of the City s Plan Areas Downtown Vancouver Kitsilano Fairview and Strathcona with all the chain bookstores located either in Downtown Vancouver or Fairview The rest are well spread throughout the City and which probably reflect a geography of retail rents household income language and education attainment levels For the rest of a breakdown of bookstores by plan area please refer to the table below Out of curiosity BTAworks juxtaposed a map layer of the City of Vancouver s Public Library branches to this independent and chain bookstore discussion The combination illustrates the geographical differences between community commons and private enterprise in this City While the bookstore locations may reflect a geography of retail rent household income language and education attainment the remarkable aspect of public libraries is that they serve populations regardless of these criterion To the immense credit of prior generations of civic governments every neighbourhood in the City has a local library branch while not necessarily having a bookstore Organizationally we do have a predisposition towards the happenings and architecture of the Surrey City Centre Library As always if this map is missing your favourite local bookseller independent or otherwise please contact the BTAworks mapping email info at btaworks com and we ll add it to the map Data Desk Observations Research Papers May 25 2013 The Life Death and Reincarnation of the Great Vancouver Corner Grocery Please click the above image for the interactive map of Neighbourhood Corner Grocery Stores in the City of Vancouver Continuing with variations on the theme of exploring the centres of community and commerce this entry looks at the phenomenon of the neighbourhood corner grocery stores in the City of Vancouver In the spirit of contributing to urban planning discourse this map of the corner groceries is the done within the context of existing land use zoning in the City As reported by the intrepid Frances Bula most of these shops were established when zoning requirements in many neighbourhoods were more flexible and when the slurpee was the unfortunate cause and effect of a night s overindulgences However as explored in her piece many of these corner groceries have seen a life death and reincarnation over the decades With factors such as changing family lifestyles and consumers behaviours the dominance of the car the emergence of 7 11 s and other chain convenience stores they have all contributed to the decline of the neighbourhood corner store However colonial modernist contemporary zoning practice in Vancouver have also not been conducive towards nurturing corner groceries Adherence to certain British planning traditions have tended to concentrate retail and commercial activities onto a High Street as opposed to sprinkled them throughout a neighbourhood as seen in other cities While this practice has perhaps pre emptively increased the land use peace in residential neighbourhoods it has also created a land use zoning regime that is not particularly friendly toward existing or much less establishing new neighbourhood commerce inside the residential districts of Vancouver Conversely these corner for the most part groceries hold a special role in the built histories and community economies of many Vancouver neighbourhoods These buildings reflect the entrepreneurial pragmatism and guile of previous generations of Vancouverites as they have often served as economic entreports for many immigrants families from around the world to establish themselves into the City The best history of the corner grocery store amongest many other built form histories in Vancouver can be found in the book Vanishing Vancouver by Michael Kluckner In particular his CBC radio interview reflects on the disappearing corner grocery store in Vancouver Another initiative to document indie convenience store in the City of Vancouver is by the Vancouver is Awesome website with their At Your Convenience project As City policies hopefully incrementally and thoughtfully densify the City s single family neighborhoods there is a new opportunity to renew these community hubs whether it is in restarting pre existing buildings or even allowing for the construction of new ones Rediscovering and supporting the local corner grocery in various incarnations could be another step towards building a sustainable city and promoting connectivity and community in the City s neighbourhoods Certainly cities like San Francisco and Portland have shown that vibrant corner groceries and commerce can still make good neighbours In this map using business licensing data from the City of Vancouver s Open Data Catalogue it documents the remaining neighbourhood corner grocery stores in the City of Vancouver in the context of land use in the City of Vancouver The methodology of identifying and mapping a corner grocery is based on the selection of active business license whose name or trade name contained either the keywords Market or Grocery In cases of glaring omission additional points where manually added to the map Chain convenience stores were excluded in this map Once these shops were identified their location in a zoning district was also noted For a breakdown on zoning district codes please consult this link Using this methodology 180 possible corner groceries were identified and not surprisingly the mass majority on a High Street or Arterial and in a non residential zone Of these 35 were located within residential zones from splits off to 18 in multi family zones and 17 in single family zones It is interesting to note that single family zones make up about 50 of the City s land mass and are single family on paper but whose unit density has effectively tripled with policies to legalize secondary basement suite and laneway homes The majority of residential corner groceries were located on the East side of the City and specifically towards its northeast corner Outside of Kitsilano residential corner groceries were sparsely located on Vancouver s West side This methodology is not a necessarily a perfect tactic of capturing every neighbourhood corner grocery in the City of Vancouver as this particular type of business crosses a number of City business licenses category There is a bit of subjectivity in this method as there is no specific City designations for neighbourhood corner groceries As always if this map is missing your favourite local corner grocery please contact the BTAworks mapping email info at btaworks com and we ll add it to the map Data Desk Observations Research Papers May 18 2013 The Independent Purveyors of Caffeine in the City of Vancouver The above interactive map provides the locations of the independent coffee and teahouses in the City of Vancouver used in this study The task of documenting the independent purveyors of caffeine in the City of Vancouver has been a far more complicated task than analyzing major coffee chains These complications come as a combination of hard technical challenges of mining and mapping raw business license data with the softer subjectivities of what qualifies as an independent coffee and tea house This analysis not only includes caffeine in the form of coffee but to reflect the multicultural fabric of this city include those who also sell tea beverages including of course Bubble Tea Cafes In this collection the sociology of caffeine in Vancouver also reflects the cultural buzz found in this City This entry represents our best try at quantitatively studying the independent coffee and tea spaces in the City of Vancouver with some observations about their possible urban economic and social implications We hope you enjoy the brew To keep terms short and simple this entry will refer to Vancouver s collection of independent houses bars counters cafes and outlets as the Independents and their corporate counterparts as the Chains Using business license data from the City of Vancouver s Open Data Catalogue BTAworks has attempted to document and map the City s numerous independent caffeine outlets To be considered an Independent a shop had to have less than 5 outlets within the City These parameters were inspired by the City of San Francisco s Chain Store Ordinance which regulates the types of Chain Stores Formula Retail in that City to protect San Francisco s vibrant small business sector and create a supportive environment for new small business innovations With arguments such as that for every 100 spent a local store has a local impact of 68 versus 43 for chain the economic and social rationale for such an ordinance can be read here Based upon our methodologies and best estimates there were a total of 198 independent coffee and tea houses bars counters cafes bars and outlets in the City of Vancouver and is compared to the 186 chain outlets spread over 8 major chains As with the Major Coffee Chains in the City of Vancouver analysis where matters About 35 percent 69 of Independents in the City of Vancouver were located inside the City s Downtown core compared to 50 percent of major coffee chains The mass major of Independents are located outside of Downtown Vancouver Within this type of dispersal one seeks how these independents help form the neighborhood identities throughout the city The top 5 planning areas with the largest amount of independents were Central Business Downtown area at 58 cafes and shops followed by Fairview 21 Kitsilano 18 Mount Pleasant 14 and the West End 10 Interestingly with the 12 Bubble Tea Houses in the study 10 are located in the outer neighborhoods of Vancouver and generally reflects the residential patterns of the City s Chinese Canadian populations particularly those with Cantonese as their mother tongue The above interactive map summarizes the number of independent and chain coffee and teahouses in the City of Vancouver by Plan Area Please excuse difference between the map viewers as we are experimenting between ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Explorer Online and would like to hear from readers about your preferences Independents have a tendency of appearing in clusters throughout the City of Vancouver While one ought to note the effects of land use zoning which in the City of Vancouver tends to concentrate commercial and retail activities on to main arterials and designated high streets Independents tend to locate near one another The best example of this occurs on 3 blocks of Commercial Drive 1200 to 1400 blocks in Grandview Woodlands with 4 Independents Moreover outside of Downtown certain street segments on Broadway West 4th Avenue Fraser Dunbar Kingsway and Hastings can be defined by the presence of Independents and Chains These segments are often located in neighbourhoods with some of the strongest urban identities in the City This short series of studies in Independents and Chain Coffee and Teahouses in the City of Vancouver occurs in the intersection of community and commerce As third spaces a space that is neither work or home cafes and coffee shops have always had role in the life of the City Indeed coffee and tea houses have been remarkable institutions in the urban landscape where events like the French Revolution first brewed in the coffeehouses of Paris Forward to Vancouver today coffee and tea houses in Vancouver have multiple roles in the City as they can serve as both conveners and indicators for a neighborhood where coffee or tea serves as a social lubricant or in certain professions a caffeinated overlord Where some readers in the Twitterverse have observed how these spaces bring together and connect nascent communities others have suggested that certain types of Independents and Chains are heralds of gentrification and displacement as not everyone in Vancouver can afford a 3 dollar cup of coffee These tensions reflect the ongoing and bigger concerns about and direction of the urban economic social and cultural development of City of Vancouver One interesting land use planning experiment would be the allowance of neighbourhood cafes particularly for Independents with certain operating parameters in Vancouver s residential neighborhoods as opposed to just being located on major transportation corridors or arterials Such a phenomenon is not without precedences given the City s long history of neighborhood corner stores In the rise of the corner or even laneway cafe there lies an opportunity to further strengthen a neighborhood s social fabric while incrementally introducing a mixed use community based local economy to these residential neighbourhoods Neighborhoods like Kitsilano and Strathcona already have prototypical examples of this type of land use with specific store types like Le Marche St George in Ridley Park and the Wilder Snail in Strathcona In a city where connection and loneliness is a growing concern this might be one community based commercial opportunity to get to know one s neighbours Beyond spaces of consumption it is worth talking about coffee and tea houses as emerging places of production An article entitled Laptopistan in the New York Times explored how cafes have become extensions of the new workplace Ideas and connections steep while people talk around a cup of coffee or contemplate on a laptop with a pot of tea which propel parts of the economy In and of themselves both independent and chain coffee and tea houses are small parts of the City s overall economy but as Tom Standage observes in his 2005 book A History of the World in Six Glasses coffee and tea and the social act of bringing people together can have powerful results However it remains an unwritten chapter whether these ideas and industries brewing coffee and tea houses of Vancouver can scale to the numbers of employment with accompanying wages that are needed to support a sustainable livable and just city Technical Notes On a technical level the difficulty in capturing independent cafes and tea shops begins with the fact that they can span five difference business license types in the City s license database Limited Service Food Establishment Restaurant Class 1 and Retail dealer Food Wholesale Dealer Food and Manufacturer Food with Ancillary Retail Between general selection parameters of coffee cafe and tea within these business license types a earlier coffee shop study on the Yelp website and participant observer field research the study was able to obtain study universe Further filtering occurred with cross referencing the Yelp study and Google searches to exclude full service restaurants It is important to note the number of full service Southeast Asian Vietnamese restaurants that have the word cafe in their Business Trade Name of which were excluded in this study There is a certain level of subjectivity in this study as it excludes most full service restaurants but does include bakery cafes and general merchandise shops where a Google search suggests that retail coffee tea hot beverage services are a major part of everyday business Stemming from comments from the earlier Kerry Gold piece on the BTAworks major coffee chain analysis citizens in this town hold deep passions for their local independent caffeine outlets far more than the 186 chain outlets Indeed one reader mentions how this hot beverage means community in a coffee cup Readers quickly volunteered neighborhood shops and cafes to this list and hopefully this piece captures the wide diversity of Independents in the City of Vancouver If this list has somehow missed your favorite independent coffee tea spot please feel free to email any omissions to the BTAworks hotline email info at btaworks com Their omission was strictly accidental Data Desk Observations Research Papers April 27 2013 The Density and Flow of Major Coffee Chains in the City of Vancouver With this interactive Coffee map please feel free to use the upper left hand buttons to see a map legend and turn a population density layer on and off Whether it is served hot to counter Vancouver s cold wet winters or enjoyed iced in the City s far too short summers coffee is one liquid aspect of culture in the City of Vancouver As a city cultural artifact BTAworks wanted to explore the patterns of coffee bars and houses in the City of Vancouver One little known piece of global coffee trivia is that the first Starbucks to open outside of the United States and in Canada was at the Seabus Skytrain Station on March 1 1987 As known as the Waterfront Station and the former Pacific Terminus for the Canadian Pacific Railway it is one of the principle intermodal transportation hubs for the Metro Vancouver region Using business license data from the City of Vancouver s Open Data catalogue BTAworks mined analyzed and mapped the locations of the major coffee chains in the City We are reserving an analysis of Vancouver vibrant independent coffee scene for a future time given the difficulties of sculpting out that data however a quick Yelp query suggests that there are over 82 independent coffeehouses and bars around the City We will also be including the City s many Bubble Tea houses in this analysis A quick unsponsored acknowledgement to Matchstick Coffee Roasters and Room for Cream on Kingsway Abruzzo on Commercial 49th Parallel on 4th Avenue and Main Street the Wired Monk on 4th Avenue Our Town on Broadway the Grind Cafe and Gallery on Main and the Wilder Snail in Strathcona for the forthcoming analysis and to preserve some semblance of indie cred At Bing Thom Architects we have a particular affinity to the Musette Caffe located just a few blocks from our offices First the major coffee chain census At 85 retail outlets Starbucks is by far the largest coffee chain in the City of Vancouver Followed by Tim Horton s 26 Blenz 26 JJ Bean 11 and Bean Around the World and Waves at 10 outlets Take 5 at 8 and Cafe Artigiano at 7 round out the major coffee chains in the City of Vancouver Interestingly when compared to the City of Surrey s business license database there are contrasts in coffee communities Where Vancouver has 85 Starbucks the City of Surrey has 18 outlets however the City of Surrey

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  • BT | A | Works » Research Papers
    percent While likely the effect of high pre existing total values values in one family dwelling areas only increased by 1 4 percent Please see the accompanying table but note that data points such as transportation right of ways may not be assigned a land use category and are listed as Data Unavailable Nevertheless as BTAworks expands this analysis to a longer time series it will be interesting to see if these value patterns of increases and declines hold for various land use types over time In terms of specific portions of the City of Vancouver properties that saw increases of total values by over 25 percent were clustered on the West End Downtown Eastside and Mount Pleasant area Properties in the inner city light industrial and industrial areas and port areas saw 25 percent or more increases in total values Strips of properties along Kingsway Main Street areas around Granville and Arbutus Street also saw major increases in property values Interestingly most properties in Vancouver s Single Family Home districts saw relatively flat patterns and in certain cases declines It would be interesting to explore the causes of these patterns but it is important to note that give the rapid ascent of the Single Family properties values in the City of Vancouver value shifts up or down could reflect the inertia of already high property values While this analysis will not examine the particular reasons why specific areas saw value increases or decreases these light industrial areas are of particular concern as they are often cited as the nursery for new firms and economic employment activities on a regional and citywide level but at the same time offer parcel assemblages that are attractive for new multi family residential development in terms of size and relative ease of acquisition to other land use types and land divisions While there are ongoing initiatives to preserve and retain employment lands within the City of Vancouver and Metro Vancouver region it remains unclear if these large value shifts in light industrial land uses in such a short time will have an upward pressure for existing tenants on the lands and their rents or arrest or even prevent the emergence of the next economic dynamo for the Region With increased industrial land values there is an opportunity to intensify industrial uses on these lands but also the danger to displace major current and future economic and employment drivers and prospects for the City and Region Technical Notes It has been an ongoing BTAworks project over the years of the 1 million line Single Family property mapping to document the total values and value changes for all properties in the City of Vancouver However the challenge has always been to how to best illustrate and account for strata properties such as condominiums Single family homes are relatively simple to represent as they have a one to one relationship to a dot however when it comes to strata properties one dot can represent dozens if not hundreds of records a One to Many relationship Without accounting for this Many to One relationship a direct matching of BC Assessment records to City of Vancouver GIS files could inadvertently only document the common areas of the near4 300 strata properties 108 000 units as oppose to the actual price dynamics with each strata property While most stratas are residential in nature it is important to note that commercial and retail stratas also exist After several years of periodic concentration this analysis pre processes the 2014 BC assessment database to create a single data point for each strata parcel Prices changes for these strata data points is an average of all total value changes of records for a particular strata property This is a pragmatic mapping solution to address this many to one data record dilemma but is much more precise than a possible inadvertent map of the values changes for strata condo areas Please note that like our previous 1 million single family home analysis we have focused on total value that is the value of both the land and improvement typically a building on it Moreover due to long standing BC Assessment Authority methodologies values in this analysis reflect the market value of a particular property in July of the previous year For example 2014 values reflect assessments made in July 2013 and 2013 values represent ones from July 2012 Another important note to acknowledge is that the analysis in this entry is based upon an unedited version of the Property tax report data available on the Vancouver Open Data Catalogue obtained in January 2013 Revisions of the tabular data may occur as the database is revised to account and or exclude data artifacts and landuse miscodes in later versions as they are discovered in later versions Data Desk Observations Research Papers January 25 2014 The Freezing of Vancouver s One Million Dollar Line Please note that these figures may be revised as the Open Data database that used in this study is refined to excluded properties like schools parks and right of ways that may have been invertantly classed as Single Family Homes in the original database AY Sept 2014 Key Findings Between 2013 to 2014 the number of single family homes in the City of Vancouver assessed at 1 million line or more has effectively remained unchanged There were 37 800 SF properties worth over 1 million in 2014 compared to 37 410 SF properties in 2013 When inflation is accounted for there were 37 910 SF properties assessed at over 1 million The total number of Single Family properties in the 2014 edition of the BTAwork s 1 million line analysis is 68 355 In 2014 about 55 percent 37 800 of the total number of Single Family properties in the City of Vancouver were worth more than 1 million While 1 135 Single Family properties in the City of Vancouver valued at under the 1 million line became valued at more than 1 million between 2013 to 2014 740 SF properties valued at more than 1 million in 2013 fell below the 1 million line in 2014 In terms of value category growth categories of homes under 3 million did not see significant increases in their numbers however homes worth between 4 million to 5 million and over 5 million saw sizable growth at 7 and 10 percent respectively Study Write up The 2014 BTAworks edition of the 1 million in the City of Vancouver s One family Dwelling or RS districts is the fourth version of our series in exploring the changing patterns of Single Family property values in the City of Vancouver We have continued to followed the same methodology of our 2013 study which follows the pathways of our 2012 and 2011 studies Generally speaking the observations and zoning histories remain steady from these previous studies However this 2014 analysis is not direct comparable with previous BTA 1 million line studies and maps as a rezoning of the Norquay Village area has removed about 1 900 Single Family parcels out of the 2014 study and as a consequence the area out of the map As with previous studies all data used in these maps was obtained from the City of Vancouver s Open Data Catalogue The property values data used in this study and map series are from BC Assessment whose methodology of assessment can be viewed it and as a consequence they do not necessarily reflect current market prices This study has also rounded raw numbers to the closest 5 or 0 Data Desk Research Papers September 5 2013 Enrollment Patterns in Metro Vancouver Public Elementary Schools 2007 08 to 2012 13 School Years As schools across the Metro Vancouver region open up for a new year BTAworks wanted to explore the enrollment patterns for public elementary schools in the region These citywide and regional wide patterns provide another proxy measure for neighbourhood dynamics beyond the Census data Public elementary school enrollment offers another measure for the demographic economic social and cultural change of a neighbourhood This scale of this map is also places individual school dynamics within a larger city and regional wide context Whether it is from the school up or the region down there are clear clusters of robust public elementary school enrollment growth decline and stability in Metro Vancouver The specific causes of this growth decline and stability through which we would like to open to our readership It is important to note that school enrollments have a tendency to ebb and flow from year to year and as consequence this map has taken a variance of 10 percent as an indicator of relative enrollment stability however past this variance decline or growth becomes increasingly statistically significant and acute In particular when a school sees either a 25 percent increase or decline over 5 school years and in particular a cluster of schools presents a particular question towards what might be happening in a particular community An older population smaller household sizes increases in regional housing choice and the short and long term housing affordability adequacy and suitability challenges for young families and increased competition for independent school options all have their effects upon declining and growing public elementary school enrollment Technical Notes All enrollment data used in this brief is from the British Columbia Ministry of Education through the DataBC website and is provided by the Province of BC under the Open Government License for the Government of BC Information v BC 2 0 The maps and tables were based on standard public elementary schools in Metro Vancouver in the BC Schools Student Headcount by Grade dataset on the DataBC website Elementary schools were specifically selected to control for district programming effects as secondary schools in many school districts have special programs that draw from throughout a school district to a single school Such programming occurred to a much lessor degree in elementary schools and we feel that this allows for most elementary schools to better reflect the local population of elementary school aged children in their immediate neighbourhoods than for secondary schools to reflect secondary school aged population Schools that were not established in or a complete headcount from the 2007 08 to 2012 2013 school years were excluded in the maps Acadia Road Elementary in Vancouver Adams Road Elementary Rosemary Heights Elementary Hazelgrove Elementary and Woodward Hill Elementary in Surrey Langley Fine Arts Elementary in Langley and Unversity Highlands Elementary and Taylor Park Elementary in Burnaby were excluded in this map Once the final tabular data was processed they were then geocoded to produce the map in the study Data Desk Observations Research Papers June 3 2013 Flotillas Not Flagships Independent and Chain Bookstores and Public Libraries in the City of Vancouver Please click the above image for the interactive map of Independent and Chain Bookstores Stores with Public Libraries in the City of Vancouver With Frances Bula s recent Vancouver magazine article on the City s bookstore scene she looks at the various reasons behind Vancouver s lack of a large independent destination flagship bookstore like Powell s Books in Portland Elliot Bay Books in Seattl e Strand Books in New York City or Munro s Books in Victoria She also looks at the overall challenges of operating an independent bookstore in the City of Vancouver and what does it take to survive and thrive in a changing climate of shifting reading habits disruptive technologies and ever increasing retail rents The answers seems to be hinged on a tale of entrepreneurial guile a mixture of specialization and co marketing merchandising customer service and a dose of luck with real estate While there are many aspects of a Murder Mystery when it comes to the fate of the independent bookstore RIP Duthie s in the City of Vancouver independent bookstores seem to best succeed when they pick a tone and a niche in the 50 shades of grey in the City s population of readers and booklovers While BTAworks leaves the investigative journalism to the professionals we examine the total population of independent and chain bookstores in the City of Vancouver What is the mix of independent and chain book dealers in the City of Vancouver As with previous entries we derive this map and analysis from the City of Vancouver s ever useful Open Data Catalogue and specifically with the 2013 edition of its Business License database Unlike previous business categories like coffee tea shops and corner grocery stores there is a specific license business subtype which identifies retail dealers that specialize in books stationary After a quick filtering of records that sell stationary and printing services BTAworks has derived this analysis and list To further illustrate the diversity of independent bookstores in Vancouver we ve also created a typology of the most common subgroups of independent book shops from those that sell comic books to non English publications to religious materials to used books In a parallel discussion we also mapped the branches of Vancouver Public Library system to these bookstores It is important to note that Costco Walmart and other general merchandise retailers have been excluded in this survey however as observed in the Bula piece they have had an effect on booksellers in the City Of course one would need to also acknowledge internet book outlets like Amazon ca and Abebooks which have certainly effected the retail market for books nationwide According to our April 2013 extraction of the City of Vancouver s Business License database there were 58 bookstores in the City of Vancouver Three bookstores 2 Chapters and 1 Coles Books were parts of the Toronto based Indigo Books Music chain with the remaining 56 stores being independents The mass majority of independents were individual one off operators with Pulp Fiction Books with 3 storefronts being the largest independent bookstore in terms of number of shops When it comes to store size the two Chapters storefronts in Vancouver are clearly the largest in term of square footage The following chart illustrates the breakdown the number of chain and independent bookstores in Vancouver For the benefit of readers we have also broken out subtypes of independents to provide a sense of the specialization that is occurring in the industry The story of Vancouver s independent bookstore seems to be one about flotillas of small shops as opposed to large flagships There is no independent destination bookstore in Vancouver as opposed to small clusters of bookstores located in various parts of the City In Vancouver small is perhaps beautiful as they reflect the most viable forms of independent bookstore given the City s real estate and retail environment There are clusters of small independents on the intersections of Pender and Richards West 4th and Dunbar and Commercial Drive and East 2th as well as along certain corridors like Broadway as well as a cluster of Chinese language bookstores in Chinatown and specifically along Keefer Over 50 percent of bookstores are located in just four of the City s Plan Areas Downtown Vancouver Kitsilano Fairview and Strathcona with all the chain bookstores located either in Downtown Vancouver or Fairview The rest are well spread throughout the City and which probably reflect a geography of retail rents household income language and education attainment levels For the rest of a breakdown of bookstores by plan area please refer to the table below Out of curiosity BTAworks juxtaposed a map layer of the City of Vancouver s Public Library branches to this independent and chain bookstore discussion The combination illustrates the geographical differences between community commons and private enterprise in this City While the bookstore locations may reflect a geography of retail rent household income language and education attainment the remarkable aspect of public libraries is that they serve populations regardless of these criterion To the immense credit of prior generations of civic governments every neighbourhood in the City has a local library branch while not necessarily having a bookstore Organizationally we do have a predisposition towards the happenings and architecture of the Surrey City Centre Library As always if this map is missing your favourite local bookseller independent or otherwise please contact the BTAworks mapping email info at btaworks com and we ll add it to the map Data Desk Observations Research Papers May 25 2013 The Life Death and Reincarnation of the Great Vancouver Corner Grocery Please click the above image for the interactive map of Neighbourhood Corner Grocery Stores in the City of Vancouver Continuing with variations on the theme of exploring the centres of community and commerce this entry looks at the phenomenon of the neighbourhood corner grocery stores in the City of Vancouver In the spirit of contributing to urban planning discourse this map of the corner groceries is the done within the context of existing land use zoning in the City As reported by the intrepid Frances Bula most of these shops were established when zoning requirements in many neighbourhoods were more flexible and when the slurpee was the unfortunate cause and effect of a night s overindulgences However as explored in her piece many of these corner groceries have seen a life death and reincarnation over the decades With factors such as changing family lifestyles and consumers behaviours the dominance of the car the emergence of 7 11 s and other chain convenience stores they have all contributed to the decline of the neighbourhood corner store However colonial modernist contemporary zoning practice in Vancouver have also not been conducive towards nurturing corner groceries Adherence to certain British planning traditions have tended to concentrate retail and commercial activities onto a High Street as opposed to sprinkled them throughout a neighbourhood as seen in other cities While this practice has perhaps pre emptively increased the land use peace in residential neighbourhoods it has also created a land use zoning regime that is not particularly friendly toward existing or much less establishing new neighbourhood commerce inside the residential

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  • BT | A | Works » Vancouver in the 21st Century – THANK YOU!
    well as wonderful fundraiser for the Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House Here s a short list of the media coverage on the event in chronological order as well as the three part series of the City and Regional economic sections of the presentation with Pete McMartin from the Vancouver Sun Jen St Denis September 25 2014 Business in Vancouver Vancouver s huge income to home price gap will continue to challenge city planner Frances Bula September 28 2014 Globe and Mail Study suggests Vancouver mayoral candidates should target super engagers Pete McMartin October 1 2014 Vancouver Sun Lotus Land or Lowest Land Pete McMartin October 4 2014 Vancouver Sun To have expensive houses and have not money Pete McMartin October 6 2014 Vancouver Sun Does Metro have room for a future We have also included a selected slide show presentation from the talk To access the slidedeck click above slide or here To see a video of the full talk and panel on Vancouver in the 21st Century click here 0 COMMENTS Comments are closed RSS Subscribe ARTICLE CATEGORIES ALL 72 Data Desk 47 Research Papers 33 Observations 37 A Look Back 8 Media 25 Public Programming 7 Search Bing Thom

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  • BT | A | Works » A Reading List on Vancouver in the 21st Century
    and Dislocation in the 21st Century Metropolis Routledge Itter Carole and Marlatt Daphne 2011 Opening Doors In Vancouver s East End Strathcona Harbour Publishing Kluckner Michael 2006 Vancouver Remembered Whitecap Books Kluckner Michael 2012 Vanishing Vancouver The Last 25 Years Whitecap Books Kalman Harold 2012 Exploring Vancouver The Architectural Guide D M Publishers Inc Kheraj Sean 2013 Inventing Stanley Park An Environmental History UBC Press Ley David 2010 Millionaire Migrants Trans Pacific Lifelines Wiley Luxton Donald Building the West The Early Architects of British Columbia Talon Books MacDonald Bruce 1992 Vancouver Visual History Talon Books MacDonald Christopher 2010 A Guidebook to Contemporary Architecture in Vancouver D M Publishers Inc Mate Gabor 2009 In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts Close Encounters with Addiction Knopf Canada Metro Vancouver 2011 Regional Growth Strategy Vancouver 2040 Weblink Perez Gomez Alberto Grabowski Christopher and Green Jim 2007 Towards an Ethical Architecture Issues within the Work of Gregory Henriquez Simply Read Books Punter John 2004 The Vancouver Achievement UBC Press Russwurm Lani 2013 Vancouver was Awesome Arsenal Pulp Press Stouck David 2013 Arthur Erickson An Architect s Life D M Publishers Inc Soules Matthew 2013 The Livable Suburbanized City Post Politics and a Vancouver Near You Harvard Design Magazine Weblink Walsh Robert M 2013 The Origins of Vancouverism A Historical Inquiry into the Architecture and Urban form of Vancouver British Columbia University of Michigan Doctorate Dissertation Weblink Winson Liscombe Rhordri 1997 The New Spirit Modern Architecture in Vancouver 1938 1963 The MIT Press Of course in the spirit of pure transparency and disclosure we think this book on another local architect is pretty cool too Social Histories of Metro Vancouver Barman Jean 2007 Stanley Park s Secret The Forgotten Families of Whoi Whoi Kanaka Ranch and Brockton Point Harbour Publishing Bown Stephen 2008 Madness Betrayal and

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  • BT | A | Works » Media
    the entire City of Vancouver were 25 percent were empty The presentation examined a universe of private regular dwelling units the formal Census definition and did not breakdown typology It was properly reported that nearly a quarter of condos in Vancouver are empty or occupied by non residents in some dense areas of downtown Indeed 22 8 percent of dwelling units in the Coal Harbour census tract were non resident occupied However one cannot extend this percentage to the state of housing occupancy in the City of Vancouver The overall pattern for Downtown Vancouver as defined by the BTAworks Powerpoint slide deck was 14 9 or 5 710 units and is compared to 7 7 for overall Citywide and 6 1 for Metro Vancouver wide patterns Where 93 of dwelling structures are Apartment buildings greater than 5 stories in Downtown Vancouver it is important to note that the dwelling stock greatly diversifies as one exits Downtown Vancouver into a number of other structural types such as single detached houses and duplexes 3 Non resident occupied does NOT equal to why The reasons why these dwellings are non resident occupied can be diverse From investment properties to seasonal homes to being in between tenants or owners to being under renovation there is a vast array of reasons why a unit could be non resident occupied Among other reasons as urban writer France Bula identifies in a recent article on Vancouver s economy is an increasingly substantial professional services workforce in Vancouver that is travelling all over the world and was perhaps away on Census Day 2011 However one interesting aspect of the why question occurs to why there are such a large concentrations of non resident occupied units in Downtown Vancouver compared to other areas of the Metro Vancouver region Non resident occupancy is not necessarily the result of high density as they are very weakly correlated For those who are interested this relationship has an R value of 19 when population density per square kilometre and number of non resident occupied units on a census tract level are fed into a correlation equation Perhaps the varying localized and regional patterns of non resident occupied dwellings across the City of Vancouver and Metro Vancouver are subjects of a future talk 4 Non resident occupied does NOT equate to foreign A major theme throughout presentation was that foreign is a very difficult concept to measure from the data sets that BTAworks has used in its condo studies Sources such as BC Assessment Home Owner Grants BC Hydro and Census data do not directly identify the citizenship status of property owners Moreover when a BC Assessment ticket is sent abroad to another country it is not known that it is being received by a foreign national or a Canadian living in that country wanting to keep a piece of property in Vancouver It is troubling that the popular press and the blogosphere is automatically attributing foreign to investment ownership While through other methods and data sources we strongly believe that many Downtown condos are investor owned non owner occupied However there is no simple and direct method of determining whether this investment is held by a Canadian or not The nationalities citizenship status of these investors is not readily known through these data sets 5 Non resident occupied unit does NOT necessarily suggest a market availability status An unit that was non resident occupied will not necessary be listed for sale or available for rent 6 There are obviously NOT 35 20 storey empty buildings in Downtown Vancouver Instead non resident occupied units were spread throughout Downtown Vancouver and dozens of buildings However one has to keep in mind that various metrics often use this writing device to convey the magnitude of a phenomenon such as x many times stretching to the moon or x many times circulating the world to convey the magnitude of a factory s productive capacity 7 A minor point occurs with my credentials I am a senior planner with Bing Thom Architects BTA and a researcher with BTAworks the firm s research and development division I am also an ADJUNCT professor at the University of British Columbia s School of Community and Regional Planning SCARP an honour that SCARP has bestowed up me To this point BTA has had the pleasure of hosting two cycles of the SCARP Planning 548V Course the Vancouver Planning Laboratory at our Burrard Street studios In these classes we have explored various great and infamous ideas affecting City Building from social capital to economic restructuring to climate change as well as the in s and out s of the Planning profession For both the instructors and the students it has been a great experiment on how the profession can be better taught to future generations of urban planners and urban professionals If there are any more questions about the presentation please feel free to contact Andy Yan info at btaworks com Data Desk Media Observations March 21 2013 BTAworks Foreign Investment in Vancouver Real Estate Slide Presentation at SFU Woodwards The Presentation Slidedeck A special thanks to Am Johal Community Engagement Coordinator at SFU Woodwards and Gordon Price Director SFU City Program for the invitation to this panel and to fellow panel members Sandy Garossino and Tsur Somerville for creating an informative dialogue to talk about the issue of foreign investment in Vancouver real estate Hopefully this will be part of a larger discussion about housing affordability and economic and physical development in an urban global age for Vancouver Media April 3 2012 Urbanpalooza 2 0 A Vancouver Urbanist Tweetup Calling all Urbanists in the City of Vancouver For the last three months the BTA Studios has been the venue for the University of British Columbia s School of Community and Regional Planning s Planning 548V Vancouver Planning Laboratory class Co taught by Dr Tom Hutton and Eileen Keenan and Andy Yan from BTAworks SCARP students explored the scholarship and the business of

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/category/media/page/2/ (2016-04-28)
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    of Vancouver Print This entry was posted on Wednesday January 20th 2016 at 12 52 am and is filed under You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2 0 feed Both comments and pings are currently

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    Vancouver tmp 22458 DSC 48931042729448 This entry was posted on Wednesday January 20th 2016 at 9 33 pm and is filed under You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2 0 feed Both comments and pings

    Original URL path: http://www.btaworks.com/2016/01/20/rising-tides-and-city-building-the-btaworks-climate-change-gauge-the-museum-of-vancouver/tmp_22458-dsc_48931042729448/ (2016-04-28)
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