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  • The Sounds of Spanish: Preface to the Teacher
    of Spanish In accord with your specific classroom goals you will have to decide how much detail students will be required to retain In a beginning undergraduate course in Spanish pronunciation it will probably be reasonable to expect students to learn only the basic material At the same time this book will additionally serve these same students as a resource for future questions about Spanish pronunciation For students in graduate level programs in Spanish or Spanish linguistics it is reasonable to require students to acquire a much more thorough background in Spanish phonetics and phonology In Part V Other Topics in Spanish Pronunciation topics such as the characteristics of Spanish word stress intonation and vowel combinations are presented Finally the last three chapters of this book provide brief introductions to the historical development of the Spanish language as it relates to present day dialect differences and to the general characteristics of the Spanish spoken on the Iberian Peninsula the Canary Islands and the New World These chapters provide only brief sketches about these topics and instructors may find it useful to supplement these areas with additional more advanced readings especially in graduate level courses After much thought on the matter and in consultation with many students and colleagues a deliberate decision was made to write this book in English The rationale for writing this book in English is that especially for undergraduate students it is useful to be able to read this type of scientifically oriented material in their native language in light of the fact that for many of these undergraduate students this is their first Spanish linguistics course If the course itself is taught in Spanish then the student benefits from reading somewhat difficult material in English which is subsequently reinforced in Spanish Many of the tables and

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  • The Sounds of Spanish: Web Resources
    4 Figure 4 1 Figure 4 2 Chapter 5 Table 5 1 Table 5 3 Chapter 7 Table 7 2 Table 7 3 Table 7 4 Table 7 5 Table 7 6 Table 7 7 Table 7 8 Table 7 9 Chapter 8 Table 8 1 Table 8 2 Table 8 3 Table 8 4 Table 8 5 Table 8 6 Table 8 7 Table 8 8 Chapter 9 Table 9 1 Table 9 2 Table 9 3 Table 9 4 Table 9 5 Table 9 6 Table 9 7 Table 9 8 Table 9 9 Chapter 10 Table 10 1 Table 10 2 Table 10 3 Table 10 5 Table 10 7 Table 10 8 Table 10 9 Table 10 10 Table 10 12 Chapter 11 Table 11 1 Table 11 2 Table 11 3 Table 11 5 Table 11 6 Table 11 7 Table 11 8 Table 11 9 Table 11 10 Table 11 11 Table 11 12 Table 11 13 Table 11 14 Table 11 15 Table 11 17 Chapter 12 Table 12 1 Table 12 2 part 1 Table 12 2 part 2 Table 12 3 Table 12 4 Table 12 5 part 1 Table 12 5 part 2 Table 12 6 Table 12 7 Table 12 8 Table 12 9 Table 12 10 Chapter 13 Table 13 1 Table 13 2 Table 13 3 Table 13 4 Table 13 5 Table 13 6 Table 13 7 Table 13 8 Table 13 9 Table 13 10 Table 13 11 Table 13 12 Chapter 14 Table 14 1 Table 14 2 Table 14 3 Table 14 4 Table 14 5 Table 14 6 Table 14 8 Table 14 9 Table 14 10 Chapter 15 Table 15 1 Table 15 2 Table 15 3 Table 15 4 Table

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  • The Sounds of Spanish: Cover
    Robert M Hammond Return to The Sounds of Spanish Home FAQ Shopping cart Order form 2009 Cascadilla Press P O Box 440355 Somerville MA 02144 USA 1 617 776 2370

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  • Spanish in Contact: Introduction
    cover a wide range of topics and approaches but all have in common a contact situation involving Spanish Studies in bilingualism have produced a significant and ever increasing bibliography We should like to call the reader s attention to a few recent volumes that also present papers on Spanish bilingualism Silva Corvalán 1995 Ashby Mithun Perissinotto and Raposo 1993 Posner and Green 1993 Smith and Zephir 1993 Holtus Metzeltin and Schmitt 1992 Klee and Ramos García 1991 Garza Cuarón and Levy 1990 Coulmas 1990 and Lope Blanch 1990 Some excellent works include Siguan 1993 Paulston 1988 1992 Fishman 1991 Carlos Solé 1990 and Tollefson 1990 John Lipski s text offers a useful readable overview of Latin American Spanish today 1994 Other useful resources can be found in the rich bibliographies provided in their papers by the contributors to this volume Organizing a collection of papers such as these which have not been commissioned according to some preconceived structure presents some interesting challenges Our solution has been to follow an overall geographical orientation However in the largest section Part III The United States some linguistically reasonable ordering criteria have also been applied The earlier papers dealing with lexicon and phonology are likely to be immediately accessible to all readers The syntax papers are the most theoretical contributions presupposing perhaps a greater degree of familiarity with current linguistic theory they are found last To help navigate through the volume we offer the following brief discussion of the papers included Part I Spain Two contributions dealing with Spanish Basque contact begin the section Robert Hammond s paper addresses the actual structure of Basque a non Indo European language and how it relates to Spanish structure in contact situations This paper is useful for those interested in the history of Spanish and its supposed Basque influence as well as for those looking at purely synchronic issues Hammond examines details on mutual influences that Spanish and Basque have had on each other s lexical systems He also presents examples of major differences and similarities in the phonological systems of both languages and discusses examples of possible mutual syntactic influence Jasone Cenoz s paper takes a very different approach and expands into the emerging area of research dealing with third language acquisition Her paper looks at the relative success of learners of English in Spain as a function of the monolingualism or Basque bilingualism of the students The author takes a rigorous methodological approach using carefully matched groups and statistical analysis Hope Doyle s essay examines the use of Catalan and Spanish in the case of bilingual youth in Barcelona By means of a questionnaire administered to students in the public school system in Barcelona the author gathers information on language behaviors and attitudes and acquires a better sense of the effects of the 1983 Law of Linguistic Normalization in Catalonia Part II Latin America The first three papers involve Spanish indigenous language contact Margarita Hidalgo examines the sociolinguistic situation of minority languages in Mexico since independence with emphasis on current circumstances Her findings especially regarding language planning and government policy toward linguistic minorities are especially timely Carol Klee studies the sociolects of a bilingual town in the Peruvian Andes She examines the Spanish spoken by partially assimilated Quechua Indians focusing on the adaptations made to standard Spanish structure She documents morphological variability in their interlanguage and compares it with the standard Spanish of Lima attempting to show to what extent Spanish may have been structurally modified by Quechua contact Yolanda Solé studies Guaraní Spanish diglossia in Paraguay She questions the prevailing wisdom that Paraguay enjoys stable bilingualism and finds rather a three dimensional language process a constellation of divergent language attitudes Using a thorough sociolinguistic technique and statistical analysis she has captured a linguistic change in process In the last paper in Part II Florencia Cortés Conde addresses English Spanish bilingualism but with English as the minority language as used among British descendants in Buenos Aires It is interesting to see the roles reversed from that most familiar of bilingual settings As is frequently the case of immigrant languages in the U S English in Argentina is shunned by young bilinguals who find its usage outside the English only Anglo school classroom inappropriate The author shows how attitudes are changing radically from a past in which the English proudly held on to their language and culture against the encroachment of Spanish Part III The United States Here are more theoretical papers many of which discuss matters that might apply to bilingualism almost anywhere In the first essay Robert Smead and Helvor Clegg look at English lexical influence specifically calques in Chicano Spanish Using a computer analysis of terms from a Chicano dictionary they apply a revised typology to the classification of English calques and a three dimensional analysis The next three papers are concerned with phonology Mehmet Yavas examines the Critical Age Hypothesis to see how age affects the accuracy of phonetic mastery of L2 acquisition He uses an instrumental analysis of Voice Onset Time after voiceless stops of bilingual children who began acquisition of English at six and at ten years of age to compare their performance with that of native speakers Marguerite MacDonald replicates an earlier project carried out in Miami s Little Havana neighborhood investigating the nature of the English heard among Hispanic high school seniors whose parents had come to the U S prior to 1980 In her new study she focuses on another set of high school seniors a newer group of refugees who were ten years old or younger when their families settled in Little Havana after the Mariel boatlift which brought 126 000 Cubans to Miami in 1980 Because of profound social and demographic changes in the Miami area in the 1980s she hypothesizes that sociolinguistic factors will bring about a change in her results MacDonald finds that social variables do influence the nature and the extent of the linguistic variation found in the English of her subjects

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  • Spanish in Contact: Review excerpt
    1998 In their introductory statement Editors Roca and Jensen state that this volume is about contact between Spanish and other language varieties with which it interacts in communities around the world v The three parts of this anthology of sociolinguistic essays by established and emerging scholars on Spanish throughout the world provide an enlightening account of the varieties of Spanish globally This anthology contains thirteen excellent papers on various aspects

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  • Spanish in Contact: Cover
    Roca and John B Jensen Return to Spanish in Contact Home FAQ Shopping cart Order form 2009 Cascadilla Press P O Box 440355 Somerville MA 02144 USA 1 617 776

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  • Surviving Linguistics: A Guide for Graduate Students, Contents
    10 pack 125 00 library binding 64 95 Contents Preface What Counts as Linguistics Who This Book Is For Always Ask for Advice Second Edition Acknowledgments 1 Graduate School Before During and After Before Graduate School Resources Imposter Syndrome Funding Job Prospects Post Degree 2 The Field of Linguistics Types of Writing That Linguists Do Collaborative Research Prescriptivism and the Linguist Learning about the Field 3 Writing Basics Finding a Topic Background Research Library Resources The Scientific Method Making an Argument Respect Plagiarism Human Subjects and Informed Consent 4 Mechanics How to Write Like a Linguist Structuring a Paper Writing up a Quantitative Study Using Examples Presenting Data Citations and References Footnotes Details Matter Danger Excessive Terminology and Thesaurus Style My Personal Top Ten Least Favorite Writing Habits 5 The Process of Writing A Place to Work Structure Getting Started Perfectionism Writer s Block Draft Groups and Writing Buddies Interpreting Comments and Taking Criticism 6 Conferences Finding an Appropriate Conference Writing and Submitting an Abstract Creating a Handout Delivering a Paper Poster Sessions Funding Your Trip Hosting a Conference 7 Funding and Publishing Your Research Grant Proposals Working Papers and Conference Proceedings Publishing an Article in a Journal Book Reviews

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  • Surviving Linguistics: A Guide for Graduate Students, Reviews
    a terrific resource for our Proseminar in Linguistics Macaulay s book provides many excellent starting points for discussing research methods and professionalization with those who are relatively new to the field and of diverse backgrounds as are many of our incoming graduate students We have found the sections on learning how to write like a linguist including how to appropriately discuss examples and how to write an effective abstract to be especially valuable as well as the sections on conference presentations and proposal writing which contain timely updates in the second edition Michael White The Ohio State University Reviews of the first edition Although she focuses on the particular needs of graduate students in her field Macaulay linguistics U of Wisconsin Madison gives common sense advice that applies to other disciplines Reference and Research Book News 21 3 August 2006 Anyone beginning graduate studies in linguistics or considering studying linguistics at the graduate level should own Surviving Linguistics by Monica Macaulay In lucid language Macaulay covers everything from applying to graduate school to applying for jobs In between she gives wonderful guidance in the important aspects of writing in linguistics obtaining funding and presenting at conferences Southwest Journal of Linguistics 25 2 December 2006 This is a much needed how to book for aspiring linguists This volume should be required reading for first year students eLanguage June 2010 Advance praise for the first edition This book satisfies a real need in our field it answers questions that our grad students repeatedly ask me and offers much better answers than I typically do Macaulay is general where she needs to be general and specific where she needs to be specific and covers an impressive range of areas most of which grad students learn about mainly through hearsay Surviving Linguistics should be

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