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  • Cell Research
    G Tawar 1 2 Laurent Mailly 1 2 and Thomas F Baumert 1 2 3 1 Inserm U1110 Strasbourg France 2 Université de Strasbourg Strasbourg France 3 Pôle Hépato digestif Institut Hospitalo Universitaire Strasbourg France Correspondence Thomas F Baumert Tel 33 368853703 Fax 33 368853750 E mail Thomas Baumert unistra fr The investigation of virus induced liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma needs small animal models modeling hepatitis C virus HCV

    Original URL path: http://www.cell-research.com/arts.asp?id=1994 (2016-02-14)
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  • Cell Research
    1 1 Center for Neurologic Diseases Brigham and Women s Hospital Harvard Medical School Boston MA 02115 USA Correspondence Francisco J Quintana Tel 1 617 525 5317 E mail fquintana rics bwh harvard edu The aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR is an important regulator of the immune response A report by Puccetti and coworkers describes a regulatory pathway by which L kynurenine L Kyn produced by tryptophan 2 3 dioxygenase 2

    Original URL path: http://www.cell-research.com/arts.asp?id=1995 (2016-02-14)
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  • Cell Research
    contributions complexities and opportunities FREE Yeon Sook Choi 1 and David E Fisher 1 1 Cutaneous Biology Research Center Department of Dermatology Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School 55 Fruit Street Boston MA 02114 USA Correspondence David E Fisher E mail dfisher3 partners org Ultraviolet radiation UVR is a major risk factor for melanoma development but it has been unclear exactly how UVR leads to melanomagenesis In a recent publication

    Original URL path: http://www.cell-research.com/arts.asp?id=1996 (2016-02-14)
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  • Cell Research
    2013 Free Sample Issue Submission Advanced Online Publication Current Issue Top 10 VOLUME 24 ISSUE 10 10 2014 1159 1161 Regeneration making muscle from hPSCs FREE Xiping Zhu 1 Lina Fu 1 Fei Yi 2 Guang Hui Liu 1 3 Alejandro Ocampo2 Jing Qu 4 5 and Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte 2 1 National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules Institute of Biophysics Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing 100101 China 2 Gene Expression Laboratory Salk Institute for Biological Studies 10010 North Torrey Pines Road La Jolla CA 92037 USA 3 Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders Beijing 100069 China 4 Key Laboratory of Non coding RNA Institute of Biophysics Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing 100101 China 5 Laboratory of RNA Biology Institute of Biophysics Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing 100101 China Correspondence Jing Qu Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte E mail jqu moon ibp ac cn belmonte salk edu In recent years researchers worldwide have developed protocols to efficiently differentiate skeletal myogenic cells from human pluripotent stem cells through either ectopic gene expression or the use of small molecules These stem cell derived myogenic cells provide new avenues for the study of muscle related diseases drug screening and are potentially a new tool for cell

    Original URL path: http://www.cell-research.com/arts.asp?id=2007 (2016-02-14)
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  • Cell Research
    Laboratory of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine South China Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health Chinese Academy of Sciences Guangzhou Guangdong 510530 China 2 Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology Shanghai Institutes of Biological Sciences Shanghai 200031 China Correspondence Duanqing Pei E mail pei duanqing gibh ac cn Gang Pei E mail gpei sibs ac cn Accumulating evidence indicates that the mesenchymal

    Original URL path: http://www.cell-research.com/arts.asp?id=1997 (2016-02-14)
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  • Cell Research
    Yokoyama 4 Cheng Wang 1 Liang Li 1 Limin Li 1 Dongxia Hou 1 Lei Dong 1 Tao Xu 5 Takachika Hiroi 4 Fuquan Yang 3 Hongbin Ji 2 Junfeng Zhang 1 Ke Zen 1 and Chen Yu Zhang 1 1 Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for MicroRNA Biology and Biotechnology JERC MBB State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology School of Life Sciences Nanjing University 22 Hankou Road Nanjing Jiangsu 210093 China 2 State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences Chinese Academy of Sciences 320 Yue Yang Road Shanghai 200031 China 3 Key Laboratory of Protein and Peptide Pharmaceuticals Laboratory of Proteomics Institute of Biophysics Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing 100101 China 4 Department of Allergy and Immunology The Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science Tokyo 156 8506 Japan 5National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules Institute of Biophysics Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing 100101 China 6 Wuxi Oncology Institute the Affiliated Hospital of Jiang Nan University Wuxi Jiangsu 214062 China Correspondence Chen Yu Zhang E mail cyzhang nju edu cn Ke Zen E mail kzen nju edu cn Junfeng Zhang E mail jfzhang nju edu cn An increased population of CD4 CD25highFoxp3 regulatory T cells Tregs in the tumor associated microenvironment plays an important role in cancer immune evasion However the underlying mechanism remains unclear Here we observed an increased secretion of miR 214 in various types of human cancers and mouse tumor models Tumor secreted miR 214 was sufficiently delivered into recipient T cells by microvesicles MVs In targeted mouse peripheral CD4 T cells tumor derived miR 214 efficiently downregulated phosphatase and tensin homolog PTEN and promoted Treg expansion The miR 214 induced Tregs secreted higher levels of IL 10 and promoted tumor growth in nude mice Furthermore in vivo studies indicated

    Original URL path: http://www.cell-research.com/arts.asp?id=1998 (2016-02-14)
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  • Cell Research
    Graduate School Shenzhen Guangdong 518055 China 2 Department of Biomedical Engineering College of Engineering Peking University Beijing 100871 China 3 Department of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation 307 Hospital Academy of Military Medicine Sciences Beijing 100071 China 4 The MOE Key Laboratory of Cell Proliferation and Differentiation College of Life Sciences Peking Tsinghua Center for Life Sciences Peking University Beijing 100871 China 5 BGI Shenzhen Shenzhen Guangdong 518083 China 6 Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences China Japan Friendship Hospital Beijing 100029 China 7 Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics China Japan Friendship Hospital Beijing 100029 China 8 Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics Beijing Renhe Hospital Beijing 102600 China 9 Peking University Stem Cell Research Center Department of Cell Biology School of Basic Medical Sciences Peking University Health Science Center Beijing 100191 China Correspondence Hongkui Deng E mail hongkui deng pku edu cn Jianzhong Xi E mail xi coe pku edu cn The applications of human pluripotent stem cell hPSC derived cells in regenerative medicine has encountered a long standing challenge how can we efficiently obtain mature cell types from hPSCs Attempts to address this problem are hindered by the complexity of controlling cell fate commitment and the lack of sufficient developmental knowledge for guiding hPSC differentiation Here we developed a systematic strategy to study hPSC differentiation by labeling sequential developmental genes to encompass the major developmental stages using the directed differentiation of pancreatic β cells from hPSCs as a model We therefore generated a large panel of pancreas specific mono and dual reporter cell lines With this unique platform we visualized the kinetics of the entire differentiation process in real time for the first time by monitoring the expression dynamics of the reporter genes identified desired cell populations at each differentiation stage and demonstrated the ability to isolate these cell populations for

    Original URL path: http://www.cell-research.com/arts.asp?id=1999 (2016-02-14)
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  • Cell Research
    Medicine at Mount Sinai One Gustave L Levy Place New York NY 10029 USA 2 Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai One Gustave L Levy Place New York NY 10029 USA 3 Developmental and Regenerative Biology Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai One Gustave L Levy Place New York NY 10029 USA 4 Department of Cardiac Surgery Cardiovascular Research Center University of Michigan 2800 Plymouth Road Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA Correspondence Yong Zhao Tel 1 212 824 8916 Fax 1 212 241 3310 E mail yong zhao mssm edu Zhong Wang Tel 1 734 763 3691 Fax 1 734 763 3697 E mail zhongw med umich edu The sinoatrial node SAN is essential for rhythmic beating of the heart however our understanding of what controls proper functioning of the SAN remains primitive To explore molecular control of SAN function we specifically deleted Baf250a a key regulatory component of the ATP dependent chromatin remodeling complex SWI SNF in the SAN Deletion of Baf250a in the SAN led to sinus bradycardia Time series analysis of dysregulated genes after deletion of Baf250a reveals a transcriptional hierarchy maintaining pacemaker cell identity i e Baf250a activates

    Original URL path: http://www.cell-research.com/arts.asp?id=2000 (2016-02-14)
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