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  • Cell Research
    J Lim 9 Hong Seob So 1 and Raekil Park 1 1 Vestibulocochlear Research Center Department of Microbiology Wonkwang University Iksan Jeonbuk 570 749 Korea 2 Department of Otolaryngology School of Medicine Wonkwang University Iksan Jeonbuk 570 749 Korea 3 Department of Beauty Design Wonkwang University Iksan Jeonbuk 570 749 Korea 4 Department of Herbology School of Oriental Medicine Wonkwang University Iksan Jeonbuk 570 749 Korea 5 Department of Oral Biochemistry School of Dentistry Wonkwang University Iksan Jeonbuk 570 749 Korea 6 College of Sport Science Chung Ang University Seoul Korea 7 Department of Audiology Nambu University Gwangju 506 824 Korea 8 Department of Surgery Chonnam National University Medical School Gwangju 560 182 Korea 9 Gonda Department of Cell and Molecular Biology House Ear Institute Los Angeles CA 90057 USA Correspondence Hong Seob So Raekil Park Tel 82 63 850 6950 82 63 850 6777 E mail jeanso wku ac kr rkpark wku ac kr We herein investigated the role of the STAT signaling cascade in the production of pro inflammatory cytokines and cisplatin ototoxicity A significant hearing impairment caused by cisplatin injection was observed in Balb c wild type WT and STAT4 but not in STAT6 mice Moreover the expression levels of the protein and mRNA of pro inflammatory cytokines including TNF α IL 1β and IL 6 were markedly increased in the serum and cochlea of WT and STAT4 but not STAT6 mice Organotypic culture revealed that the shape of stereocilia bundles and arrays of sensory hair cell layers in the organ of Corti from STAT6 mice were intact after treatment with cisplatin whereas those from WT and STAT4 mice were highly distorted and disarrayed after the treatment Cisplatin induced the phosphorylation of STAT6 in HEI OC1 auditory cells and the knockdown of STAT6 by STAT6 specific siRNA

    Original URL path: http://www.cell-research.com/arts.asp?id=349 (2016-02-14)
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  • Cell Research
    Liu Feng Cui Qingliang Li Bojiao Yin Huawei Zhang Baoying Lin Yaorong Wu Ran Xia Sanyuan Tang and Qi Xie State Key Laboratory of Plant Genomics National Center for Plant Gene Research Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology Chinese Academy of Sciences No 1 West Beichen Road Beijing 100101 China Correspondence Qi Xie E mail qxie genetics ac cn Eukaryotic organisms have quality control mechanisms that allow misfolded or unassembled proteins to be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum ER and subsequently degraded by ER associated degradation ERAD The ERAD pathway is well studied in yeast and mammals however the biological functions of plant ERAD have not been reported Through molecular and cellular biological approaches we found that ERAD is necessary for plants to overcome salt stress Upon salt treatment ubiquitinated proteins increased in plant cells especially unfolded proteins that quickly accumulated in the ER and subsequently induced ER stress responses Defect in HRD3A of the HRD1 HRD3 complex of the ERAD pathway resulted in alteration of the unfolded protein response UPR increased plant sensitivity to salt and retention of ERAD substrates in plant cells Furthermore we demonstrated that Ca 2 release from the ER is involved in the elevation of

    Original URL path: http://www.cell-research.com/arts.asp?id=350 (2016-02-14)
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  • Cell Research
    Jiri Friml 5 6 Ben Scheres 4 Hongwei Guo 1 and Zhenbiao Yang 2 1 National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering College of Life Sciences Peking University Beijing 100871 China 2 Center for Plant Cell Biology Department of Botany and Plant Sciences University of California Riverside CA 92507 USA 3 State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry Department of Plant Sciences College of Biological Sciences China Agricultural University Beijing 100193 China 4 Section of Molecular Genetics Department of Biology Utrecht University Padualaan 8 3584 CH Utrecht The Netherlands 5 Department of Plant Systems Biology Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie Ghent University 9052 Gent Belgium 6 Department of Plant Biotechnology and Genetics Ghent University 9052 Gent Belgium Correspondence Zhenbiao Yang E mail yang ucr edu Within a multicellular tissue cells may coordinately form a singular or multiple polar axes but it is unclear whether a common mechanism governs different types of polar axis formation The phosphorylation status of PIN proteins which is directly affected by the PINOID PID protein kinase and the PP2A protein phosphatase is known to regulate the apical basal polarity of PIN localization in bipolar cells of roots and shoot apices Here we provide evidence that the phosphorylation status mediated PIN polarity switch is widely used to modulate cellular processes in Arabidopsis including multipolar pavement cells PC with interdigitated lobes and indentations The degree of PC interdigitation was greatly reduced either when the FYPP1 gene which encodes a PP2A called phytochrome associated serine threonine protein phosphatase was knocked out or when the PID gene was overexpressed 35S PID These genetic modifications caused PIN1 localization to switch from lobe to indentation regions The PP2A and PID mediated switching of PIN1 localization is strikingly similar to their regulation of the apical basal polarity switch of PIN proteins

    Original URL path: http://www.cell-research.com/arts.asp?id=351 (2016-02-14)
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  • Cell Research
    1 Zhen Ouyang 1 Zhaoming Liu 1 Yu Zhao 1 Nana Fan 1 Jun Song 1 Jiangtian Tian 1 Feng Li 1 Jifeng Zhang 2 Lin Chang 2 Duanqing Pei 1 Y Eugene Chen 2 and Liangxue Lai 1 1 Key Laboratory of Regenerative Biology South China Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health Chinese Academy of Sciences Guangzhou 510530 China 2 Cardiovascular

    Original URL path: http://www.cell-research.com/arts.asp?id=352 (2016-02-14)
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  • Cell Research
    direct binding to pyruvate kinases Nan Chen 1 2 Oliver Rinner 1 Dominika Czernik 1 Katarzyna J Nytko 3 Dan Zheng 1 Daniel P Stiehl 3 Nicola Zamboni 1 Matthias Gstaiger 1 and Christian Frei 1 1 ETH Zurich Department of Biology and Competence Center for Systems Physiology and Metabolic Diseases CC SPMD 8093 Zurich Switzerland 2 Laboratory of Physical Biology Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences

    Original URL path: http://www.cell-research.com/arts.asp?id=353 (2016-02-14)
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  • Cell Research
    Sample Issue Submission Advanced Online Publication Current Issue Top 10 VOLUME 21 ISSUE 6 6 2011 987 990 Human peripheral blood born hematosphere as a niche for hematopoietic stem cell expansion Jin Hur 1 2 Jonghanne Park 1 Sang Eun Lee 1 3 Chang Hwan Yoon 1 3 Jae Hee Jang 1 4 Ji Min Yang 1 4 Tae Kyu Lee 1 Jae Il Choi 1 Han Mo Yang 1 3 Eun Ju Lee 1 2 Hyun Jai Cho 1 2 3 Hyun Jae Kang 1 2 3 Byung Hee Oh 3 Young Bae Park 2 3 and Hyo Soo Kim 1 2 3 4 1 National Research Laboratory for Cardiovascular Stem Cell Niche Seoul National University Hospital 101 Daehak ro Jongno gu Seoul 110 744 Korea 2 Innovative Research Institute for Cell Therapy Seoul National University Hospital 101 Daehak ro Jongno gu Seoul 110 744 Korea 3 Cardiovascular Center Department of Internal Medicine Seoul National University Hospital 101 Daehak ro Jongno gu Seoul 110 744 Korea 4 Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences Seoul National University Seoul Korea Correspondence Hyo Soo Kim Tel 82 2 2072 2226 E mail hyosoo snu ac kr Cell Research 2011 21 987 990 doi

    Original URL path: http://www.cell-research.com/arts.asp?id=354 (2016-02-14)
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  • Cell Research

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    Original URL path: /artsmore1.asp?id=24 (2016-02-14)


  • Cell Research
    factor 10 526 Thomson Reuters 2013 Free Sample Issue Submission Advanced Online Publication Current Issue Top 10 VOLUME 21 ISSUE 7 7 2011 993 994 Caveolar vesicles generate DNA damage and perpetuate cellular aging Keith Wheaton Department of Biology York University 4700 Keele Street Toronto Ontario M3J 1P3 Canada Correspondence Keith Wheaton E mail kwheaton yorku ca Cell Research 2011 21 993 994 doi 10 1038 cr 2011 73 published

    Original URL path: http://www.cell-research.com/arts.asp?id=323 (2016-02-14)
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