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  • 100 Books Every Blues Fans Should Own, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Lanham, MD
    giant born in Rolling Fork Mississippi As I turned each page of 100 Books I reminded myself of the daunting task of whittling down generations of blues scholarship in the English language to just 100 titles I thought a few more of my favorite books would land on 100 Books but that s no slight against Komara and Johnson It s a matter of personal preference I still enjoy Bill Wyman s Blues Odyssey a 2001 coffee table style travelogue from the Rolling Stones bassist and despite its occasional tilt toward academic research I like Dr David Grazian s Blue Chicago The Search for Authenticity in Urban Blues Clubs Another book on my best of list is Today s Chicago Blues by local author Karen Hanson While this guidebook was not intended to explore the history and nuances of Chicago blues I thought it captured a creative snapshot of the 2007 Chicago blues scene Fortunately for fans of Chicago blues approximately one fifth of the titles in 100 Books is about or by artists who have contributed significantly to Chicago blues including autobiographies from Buddy Guy David Honeyboy Edwards and Big Bill Broonzy plus biographies of Howlin Wolf Muddy Waters and Little Brother Montgomery I am pleased that David Whiteis Chicago Blues Portraits and Stories landed in 100 Books Whiteis followup Southern Soul Blues was likely released during the production of 100 Books so it could not have been included still it received the 2014 Best Research in Recorded Blues Hip Hop Rhythm Blues Award by the Association for Recorded Sound Collections Whiteis is no stranger to recognition in 2001 he received the Keeping the Blues Alive Award in the journalism category in 2001 from the Blues Foundation For me three Chicago blues books in 100 Books have stood the test of time Chicago Breakdown Spinning Blues into Gold and Chicago Blues as Seen from the Inside Mike Rowe s landmark Chicago Breakdown was first published in the UK in 1973 and in the USA two years later as Chicago Blues The City the Music Rowe not only presents a history of Chicago blues in cultural and musical contexts he also uses U S Census data to paint a demographic picture of the Great Migrations of African Americans from the South to the City of the Big Shoulders in the early 1910 1930 and mid 1940 1970 decades of the 20 th century I found the British edition at the long shuttered Kroch s and Brentano s on South Wabash Street in Chicago as a teenager this book has been with me ever since Author Nadine Cohodas has written a number of books about politics and race relations Her entry in 100 Books Spinning Blues into Gold The Chess Brothers and the Legendary Chess Records was a New York Times Notable Book of 2000 and inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 2002 as a classic of blues literature Cohodas painstakingly recreates the early days of the label in

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  • Amy Hart with Nick Gaitan & The Umbrella Man, live at Mayne Stage, Chicago, concert review
    air of extra urgency to the proceedings At the opening cue Hart s five piece band launched into an instrumental groove owing heavily to the blues as well as Americana with a slightly country leaning touch every now and then Not many Chicago blues bands feature dobro alongside blues harp but Hart is apparently more than pleased to do a little genre bending and the results are more than decent Dobro player Gene Bush distinguished himself a number of times during the set Also with the tape rolling Amy was looking good which while not essential to the performance never hurts of course Decked out in a black cocktail dress with silver bangles set off against her long blond hair she wielded her Fender with style and grace While many blues acts sprinkle their sets liberally with cover versions Hart concentrates on original songs such as Put Me Back and Red Dress Blues Blues At The Top Of The World documents her experience headlining the Himalayan Blues Festival in Nepal Sometimes Country Gets The Blues blends Nashville with Chicago a slower number that showcases Hart s youthful sounding vocals All in all Hart s Mayne Stage performance was a winning

    Original URL path: http://www.chicagobluesguide.com/reviews/live-reviews/amy-hart-review/amy_hart_live_mayne_stage_page.html (2016-02-15)
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  • Dave Specter interview, Dave Specter injects heart, soul, blues into his Message In Blue
    capture the soulful intensity of the tune I ve recorded with some great singers but working with Otis is about as good as it gets Q This Time I m Gone For Good was recorded as a tribute to the late Bobby Blue Bland What do you think was his greatest contribution to the music world Bobby Bland was simply one of the greatest blues and R B singers of all time An amazing body of work with a long list of classic songs and albums His early Duke sides are my favorites along with His California Album and Dreamer albums from the 70s Q You are just coming off an extensive European trip How did that go I ve heard that European audiences are more receptive to the blues than American audiences How do you find European audiences compared to American audiences Well we just played 14 shows in 8 countries in 17 days so I think I ve finally recovered Very cool tour with great audience response The European fans don t take us for granted They respect the music and show it They also buy our albums and often show up to gigs with entire collections of your work wanting autographs European audiences are generally more reserved and polite than here in America which can be a bit of an adjustment Q I understand you were first introduced to the blues listening to The Midnight Special show on WFMT Was there any artist in particular that got you interested in the blues Who would you say has been your biggest influence Jimmy Johnson Dave Specter I grew up in a very musical home here in Chicago where my parents loved listening to WFMT s Midnight Special as well as Studs Terkel s radio show where I first heard Big Bill Broonzy Leadbelly Josh White and Mahalia Jackson who my dad really loved My older brother who plays harp also turned me onto the blues of Howlin Wolf Muddy Waters and Junior Wells as he d tell me about seeing them perform live when I was just a kid Impossible to name only one influence so I d have to include my family Chicago blues from Muddy Waters to Otis Rush and Magic Sam T Bone Walker and Kenny Burrell B B Albert and Freddy King Steve Freund Jimmy Johnson Ronnie Earl and Duke Robillard Q You toured with the likes of Son Seals Hubert Sumlin and Sam Lay before forming your own band in 1989 What did they teach you How do you think your playing has evolved over the years Dave Specter Hubert Sumlin 1985 Hubert taught me that developing an original style of playing is what it s all about Don t copy other players Be yourself Hubert was also so encouraging as I first toured with him and Sam Lay when I was only in my early 20s It took me awhile to learn Hubert s lesson and I wish so many of the

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  • Interview with WXRT Blues DJ Tom Marker, Keeping the Blues Alive Since 1984
    acts versions of blues songs so that made me more familiar with the style Butterfield was an eye opener with the East West record I was 15 years old at the time and it was a record that opened my imagination as to what music could be with its blend of blues and Eastern music Also during my high school years the great Chicago blues label Chess Records was selling their library to another record company I think it was an attempt to goose their sales at the time but they decided to release a classic blues album by one of their big stars every week for a period of time My buddy Charles Schantz went out and bought one every week I had heard all this blues rock but now here was the real thing on our turntables L to R Phil Guy Tom Marker Buddy Guy Q You ve had the opportunity to interview and meet many blues musicians over the years including Muddy Waters and Stevie Ray Vaughan What were your impressions of them Do you have any favorite interviews or stories There were several times I found myself backstage at a Muddy Waters show often at Harry Hopes in Cary IL There was always a crowd around Muddy so I sort of hung around Pinetop Perkins one of the sweetest men ever Meanwhile Bob Margolin was telling my young bride where his hotel was just in case she wanted to know Q What was it like receiving the Keeping the Blues Alive award Do you feel that Blues Breakers has helped to keep the blues alive I was very proud to receive the KBA Plus it meant WXRT would fly me to Memphis for a fun blues weekend The award did its job Ever since it

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  • Interview with Bobby Rush by Terry Abrahamson
    remember the name of the club at that time but it became The Cotton Club I was gettin 7 a night And I as the bandleader paid the band four dollar and fifty cents Early 50s that s what I m makin And Muddy Waters was makin 15 a night Fifteen dollars a night A Superstar I come to Chicago in 1951 Muddy Waters was there Little Walter was there Willie Dixon was there In 1953 or 54 Pigmeat Markham and Moms Mabley came In 1955 Chuck Berry came In 1957 Etta James came I was drivin a taxi picked her up at the bus station took her to Chess I didn t know her pure coincidence Also in 1957 the last of 56 Howlin Wolf came In 1957 Buddy Guy came In 1957 John Lee Hooker came Smokey Hogg and Lightnin Hopkins had already been there Ike Turner and the Girl with the Violin Case Shoes Bobby Rush s booty shakin dancers photos Michael Kurgansky BR I remember I went to Rock Island for the first time Ike Turner and I were playin The Habana Club And I remember this cause it was me and Ike Turner Tina wasn t there We was buckin heads with Little Richard He was playin an auditorium He was a bigger act than we was But we had fires settin in this little club I was really cocky in that area I was about 20 21 years old Ike s about the same age We both thought we was good lookin thought we could pull every woman we saw So I walked in the bar Fats Jenkins he was the owner and I got the gig through his nephew Curtis Jenkins who was a friend of mine Fats is sittin at the bar and he says Hey Bobby Rush How you doin And I say Fine I say What time do you start He say Well we ll start in a few minutes I had Earl Hooker on gui tar for me Moose John Walker was on keyboard And I went up to do my little set and came back and this lady was sittin down with her legs crossed like this bar stool show a lotta leg position And man she had some legs on her And I say How you doin baby and Ike Turner say That woman ain t gon talk to you cause I been tryin to talk to her all night and she won t talk to me she ain gon talk to you And that s what Ike said cause Ike thought he was the King of the Pretty Guys I thought I was too And my drummer was named my drummer was a big guy Tony And she was talkin to Tony and Tony would buy her a beer You got to see Tony Tony looked like a moose I say to Ike How d he beat us out and Ike say I don t know man This drummer got us beat out So I go back up on the stage and Ike came to sit in with me and at this point she been sittin there a couple hours And I look down and she got feet like this spreads his hands waaay apart and this is God s truth the feet was so big like violin cases And I say to Ike This woman we been hittin on look what she s walkin on laughter And by that time she d been drinkin and you could see this motions to his Adam s apple goozlin disgusted Ooo s all around But she was lookin good though She was lookin good But I told Ike Man I been tryin to talk to this woman all night And Ike says Man that s a drag queen You know what that is don t ya So we goes to the hotel that night Three o clock in the morning A little old shabby hotel I m in my room Tony knock on the door whispers Bobby Rush you gotta come here Man you wouldn t believe it I say What is it Tony What s goin on man He says That s a man I say Well I tried to tell you man So what you gonna do He says Well I spent so much money Why don t you just come in the room with me And I told Ike and we just fell down and laughed about it Whatever happened we was gone the next day But that was the most beautiful woman you would ever want to see Until I saw them feet and I told Ike Look at that And we walked down there and say Hello By that time she just says Goodnight The King Crosses Over photo Michael Kurgansky TA What were the first clubs you played in Chicago BR Skins in Robbins Illinois The Apex in Phoenix Illinois That s where I stood behind a curtain TA You stood behind a curtain BR I had to play behind a curtain because I was Black and they had this curtain on the stage and I had to play behind it They wanted to hear my music but they didn t want to see me Even here in Chicago in the 1950s There was no Black people on Rush Street They had signs No colored allowed and that was Bourbon Street that was the club on Rush and Walton and I was one of the first Black folks they hired I was maybe the first and Sammy Davis Jr was the second and Bill Cosby was the first Black MC they hired Then I hired Redd Foxx TA Did you ever play the Roberts Motel Lots of laughter from Bobby and Lynn LYNN ORMAN WEISS Herm is still alive BR You sure laughing I m gon kill him I didn t know Herm was still alive He had me Dinah Washington All of em Brook Benton He let me book Dinah Washington myself TA Unlike most of the guys of your generation who came up from the South you ve got more than just Chicago Blues You ve got the Louie Jordan Kansas City thing Plus R B You even landed on Kenny Gamble s Philadelphia International label for a while alongside Billy Paul and the O Jays So when you played these clubs what were you playing BR Mostly Chicago Blues but I got a mixture of Blues and another kinda thing too I think that s why I worked as much if not more than Muddy or Buddy Because of my swiftness of the crossover TA Did you ever play in a club and you re playing one kind of music and the clubowner asks What are you playing BR That come to me a few times There was one time in Kewanee Illinois and the clubowner says We love you The people love you But what the f k did you just play A Guy Walks into a Bar with This Head photo Michael Kurgansky TA A Blues bar from the 50s and 60s that you don t hear much about is the Zanzibar BR Right the Zanzibar That was on Ashland and around 13 th just south of Roosevelt They d have nights same night every week Muddy would play on this night Howlin Wolf on that night Little Walter was a big deal there But I ll tell you a better story See I didn t live but a few blocks west of there One night I m comin home from the Zanzibar with Little Eddie Little Eddie was a harp player who was a barber by day He had a barber shop at Roosevelt and Kedzie Well one night Little Eddie and I walk out of the Zanzibar up Ashland and we re stoppin in this bar at Roosevelt and Ashland But we re walkin in and everybody else is runnin out like somebody been shootin or something By the time we get inside ain t but one man at the bar and next to him up on the bar was this woman s head TA A head BR Just a head And this guy next to the head I don t know if she was his wife or his girlfriend but apparently he walked in the bar not in a hurry not nervous just takes the head from under his coat puts it on the bar and says Gimme a drink and give this bitch a drink And everybody runs out and the bartender goes berserk But not this guy He s just calm I don t know what she did to piss him off but she did somethin Vee Jay The DJs and Chicken Heads photo Jennifer Noble BR Calvin Carter and Vivian Carter had this record company out of Gary Calvin that was Vivian s brother Calvin Carter was my best friend That was my running buddy my sho nuff friend In 1953 she met Jimmy Bracken who had Jimmy Records And they got married and changed the name to Vee Jay Records Don t nobody know this but me and Chuck Berry They got in trouble in 65 Calvin Carter had a business partner His name was Leo Arsdell Leo Arsdell was a preacher here in Chicago He was a Jehovah s Witness preacher He was his money banker So he say Bobby Rush I need a song to cut I say I got a song They say What s the name of your song I say Chick Heads He says Bring it by me and my partner let us listen to it So I bring it by And Leo says Whatcha got there boy And I say I got a song I had my guitar And I played it 1968 He say What s the name of it I say Chick Heads He said No boy you can t call no record like that And I say What I mean by it is Chicken Heads He say Chicken Heads Where you from boy I say Down South He say Oh yeah they eat chicken heads down there don t they boy Now at that time he musta been 60 65 years old Wasn t an old man but to me he was old because he was much older than I was He says Oh yeah I remember they eat chicken heads and feet down South He says How s your song go I told him Daddy told me on his dyin bed Give up your heart but don t lose your head You came along and what did I do I lost my heart and my head went too Didn t have nothin to do with a chicken But he bought it and he said But we need a A and a B side What else you got And I said I got a song Mary Jane He said Oh yeah a girl like that did me wrong I say I m not talkin about a girl at all I was talkin about the smoke laughing you know And I was talkin about that because Muddy Waters had this song when he s thirsty give him champagne when he wants to get high give him reefer If he could get away with it why couldn t I So we went in the studio Tyrone Davis went in the studio with me So Calvin Carter Tyrone Davis and I and two or three musicians I was takin my guitar and showin em how to play the lines Now what they did with this session Betty Everett and Tyrone Davis and I had four hours I m payin for the four hours I didn t know Calvin Carter was cuttin two other artists on my money TA You re paying to rent the studio time BR I m payin four hours studio time to cut my record and they recorded Betty Everett and Tyrone Davis two other artists before me on my time So when we got there about 45 minutes was all we had This was my money I m payin for this So I had Ralph Bass the producer from Chess and he says Well we got about 45 minutes So I say I don t have much time let me show you how this go So I show em sings the groove They couldn t catch it And Tyrone Davis is cussin and says Man you play the damn thing yourself I say Okay let me show you this one more time And I play it on my guitar from the top to the bottom I m singin and playin I say that s what it is Let s do it And Ralph Bass says Good take He cut it while I m showin him how to play it Never cut it again So let me tell you what happened We go to the disc jockey convention in Miami So I go and rent a suite The suite was a couple hundred dollars A lotta money They went down with me They had my record and a Betty Everett record Now Calvin Carter was in trouble with the record companies And a lady come with me says Let s go rent this suite for the disc jockeys So I m tryin to invite promoters and record company executives to make me a record deal James Brown is there and he s down the hall and I go visit him and I tell him what I m doing And he was a business man And he says Bobby Rush I ain t got time right now but I ll head on there and give it a listen So I m in this room sittin back there in the corner with the light off and I m sittin there and I m kinda dozin off and Calvin Carter and Leo came in with these White guys from Fantasy Records So when they come in they put the record on it s a Betty Everett record And they said We like that And then they say But where s that Bobby Rush guy at And Calvin says He s at James Brown s room I ll go get him So when he left the two White guys say moanin and groanin We don t like this sh t Talkin about the Betty Everett record And a minute later Calvin comes back in and they smile and say Hey Calvin We really like this but we gonna let you know See when they re talkin to themselves they re sayin We don t like it But when Calvin comes in they sayin We think you got somethin there Calvin But what about that snaps his fingers several times as though trying to summon the name that little longhaired guy that so and so And Calvin turned the light on and there I was sittin in the corner And they pick up this record and it says Bobby Rush on it and Calvin didn t want them to hear it because it wasn t done it didn t have the mix on it But they put it on and they say Wow What kinda sh t is that They was all over this record And I walk over and they made a deal right this minute gave me fifty five thousand dollars For that record Right then On the spot And guess what I got Five hundred Totally Chicken Heads Follow me That was a Gold Record Vee Jay Records But they released it on Fantasy Fantasy had the record The biggest thing they had Follow me See Calvin didn t believe in me He used my money and all my recording expectations cutting Betty Everett on my money and wouldn t put my record on there TA So where d the fifty five thousand go BR To him And I didn t get but five hundred dollars of that Went to VeeJay or whoever it went to But you know all them peoples dead and gone Bobby Rush and Paul Brown Come Together Bobby Rush Paul Brown at the Grammys photo Lynn Orman Orman Music BR Now I have grown in crossover to a White audience I have come to know them as well as a BB or a Buddy Guy But by the same token there s Black Blues guys who don t know nothin about this over here You know what I m talkin about They don t know nothin about how to soothe this Black audience They don t know nothin about what I did last night I can soothe an audience They don t know nothin about that So I got to be careful you know that I don t get out of line That s a hard task if I want to do an all White audience well that s another story altogether PAUL BROWN I mean I don t even know of anybody else who can do that And to me that s somethin I treasure How he can do that And that s so important to me to not stay in the lines in that to keep that goin BR Now think about yourself You wasn t hired to do that and yet you can get with Roy Rogers you can play with Ann Peebles Look at that PB Well I m twisted BR That s a hard task You do the same thing I do You play with the White guys and then you go play with Roy Rogers and Ann Peebles and Shirley Brown But everybody can t do it I ll tell you what you do take one of my guys and put em over there and see what happens PB I ll tell you a good example of that is that I just

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  • Bobby Rush's "Down in Louisiana" is up for a Grammy
    song we showed up for waited for shouted for Forty years on I can see Joe wrapped in a sleeveless Play Doh colored leisure suit rotating his Black Jell O hips crooning Little Girl Little Girl you sure can cook Little Girl Little Girl you got me hooked When you cook that chicken save me the head I should be workin but I m home in bed Minutes later I learned that the biggest crowd ever to fill Charlie s undoubtedly the biggest New England crowd ever to hear Chicken Heads was actually there for the headliner a guy I d never heard of named Bruce Springsteen But so what Good for Chicken Heads and good for Mighty Joe finally getting a little well deserved recognition Decades later I learned that Chicken Heads wasn t even written by Mighty Joe Young at all but by his fellow Louisiana native Bobby Rush And here Bobby Rush was living in my native Chicago having relocated north to expand his musical horizons from the Southern chitlin circuit and to open a BBQ joint featuring his own homemade hot link sausages And maybe served with some chicken heads on the side And this Sunday January 26 with a little help from a Tennessee keyboardist human Jiffy Pop Memphis producer named Paul Brown Bobby Rush might just bag himself a Grammy for his excellent CD Down in Louisiana And if he doesn t well he and Paul still get to walk the red carpet And they still got their nomination which is more than Bruce Springsteen got at least this year When you grab your copy of Down in Louisiana and shame on you if you don t you won t find Chicken Heads on the song list But Chicken Heads is all over that music like turquoise polyester on Mighty Joe The same smoky swampy bluesy greasy funk that used to pull Gary and I out of our seats on Lincoln Avenue and deposit us onto a sloping rotting porch on the outskirts of Shreveport will leave you feeling like you survived a knife fight with an alligator only to find yourself passing him a jar in a rusted out Electra resting precariously on cinderblocks under the Dan Ryan As collaborators Bobby Rush and Paul Brown go back together 14 years As musicologists they go back nearly a century You Just Like a Dresser mines the lyrical your love is like a faucet metaphors that Bobby traces to the 1920s Rainin in My Heart echoes the hopefulness of Trouble in Mind Don t You Cry suggests a Sittin on Top of the World that must ve entered Howlin Wolf s psyche light years south of 21st and Michigan What is the Blues starts as a botheration on your mind that sets out on an unmarked dirt road and slowly slinks northward curling up 30 years later at the feet of Muddy Waters Swing Low puts Bobby at the pulpit leading a street corner revival

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  • Orthopedic surgeon Dan Ivankovich, aka Chicago Blues All-Stars bandleader Chicago Slim, mends bones by day and plays blues by night
    you happen to be counting floor tiles when Dan Ivankovich walks into the examining room you might miss the way he has to duck to get through the doorway That s the way it is though when the hairs on your head are nearly 7 feet off the ground And that s how it is for Dr Dan aka The Right Reverend Doctor D as the iconoclastic bone doc is called when he puts down his spine or knee or hip reconstruction tools and picks up his six string fire breathing Rodriguez Baritone Strat blues guitar Fact is once you see the doctor s supersize shadow spill across the floor you ll pay attention all right Start with the boots size 17 if you re measuring They re heavy black leather and studded with enough silver to set off the nearest metal detector Then go up the legs way up He s decked out this day and most every day in black surgical scrubs with Maltese crosses stitched into the thigh and across the right hip pocket Beneath the black leather vest you can read the words Bone Squad spelled out just above where his big heart thumps Then there s all the bling Skull and crossbones on the middle finger Hoop earrings Maybe a chain or two depending on the day And a black leather biker s cap pulled on backward with the bill behind him and riding down his neck It s not hard to be distracted by the getup It s not hard to think this is just some bad ass bone fixer who knows a thing or two about how to turn heads and take a star turn on the nightly TV news say when he air dropped into Haiti after the earthquake of 2010 to see what miracles of mending he could pull from all the rubble Don t miss the point here Ivankovich who graduated from Northwestern s Feinberg School of Medicine in 1995 might not look the part of the polished orthopedic surgeon Nor might he practice out of some spiffy Gold Coast suite But this good doctor who knows through and through the agony of defeat and the thrill of uncharted triumph has carried his surgeon s tools to the front lines of urban poverty and violence and he s hell bent on serving the most underserved photo Thomas Rosen That might be the little kid with the shattered elbow who never got a simple plaster cast and had to suffer through the pain Or the old woman whose odd angled knees buckle beneath her with cruel regularity leaving her to whimper on the bathroom floor for one whole morning recently before she found her way to Dr Dan Or more often than not it s one of the shattered ones from what Ivankovich calls The Knife and Gun Club That he explains is when the knife blade or the bullet doesn t hit a vital organ and leave the victim dead but rather it eventually penetrates a bone that s going to need the armament of plates and screws and pins and rods that is the everyday medicine of Dr Dan One recent morning in his red walled clinic in Chicago s rough and tumble West Side Austin neighborhood where in just one ugly summer s weekend a record setting 75 felonies that s murders rapes gunpoint robberies and carjackings were committed in a mere three block radius Ivankovich wasted no time in telling his story I went from being all everything to all nothing in the blink of an eye says the former high school basketball star who was admitted to Northwestern s six year Honors Program in Medical Education back in 1981 I went from being the lead dog to having nothing I was the underdog It s that lead dog to underdog theme that is his leitmotif This long tall dude an All American center at Glenbrook South High School who could once shoot the lights out on any basketball court anywhere knows what it is to taste defeat And he lives and breathes to upturn the bitter equation It s about pulling for the underdog says the 49 year old surgeon who reconstructs two to three spines a week sees some 5 000 patients a year and still makes time for a handful of house calls every week Everybody wants a winner The people who have no monetary means no anything who are just in the shadows I wanna be their champion I can take them from despair to functionality That s the journey To take people to a place they can t conceive of This is the front line This is the combat zone We re at war Here s the back story Ivankovich the Croatian born son of immigrant physicians had his dream scheme all etched out back before he stepped into the bright lights at Boston University s Walter Brown Arena for the Boston Shootout a high stakes streetball invitational that long ago summer of 81 Team Chicago Boston Shootout 1981 with Walter Downing at Avalon Park Chicago IL My life was set he begins It was all determined I was on the golden path I was gonna be in the NBA then be a team doctor play on the Yugoslav Olympic team It was all very simple And very clear Until as Ivankovich recalls I collided with somebody at center court midway through the tournament in the last week of June 1981 I heard a huge pop I fell on the ground We were playing against Patrick Ewing s Boston streetball team he interjects for emphasis perhaps My knee just blew up like a balloon Back then there was no MRI no doctor was able to look at me and see what exactly it was I was a 17 year old kid I took the plane back home on crutches It took four doctors and one long month to figure out it was

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  • Blues is in Big Bill Morganfield's blood, interview with a true son of the blues
    at 1480 Old Deerfield Rd near Skokie Hwy Highland Park IL For info visit http www theshedfest com The Highland Park festival runs two days and features a variety of music acts and food booths The event is a fundraiser for Rebecca s Dream an organization dedicated to raising awareness for teen depression bi polar disorder and suicide prevention Big Bill was kind enough to take time from his busy schedule to do an interview with Chicago Blues Guide photo Jennifer Noble Q Congratulations on being inducted into the Chicago Blues Hall of Fame recently The ceremony was held at Buddy Guy s Legends on April 28 2013 and we were there to witness both you and your half brother Mud Morganfield accept your awards You and Mud performed together for a couple Muddy Waters songs which was a very special moment Was this the first time you and Mud performed together Thank you Larry Mud and I performed at Westmont Blues Festival several years ago That was the first time We also played Chicago Blues Festival with Pinetop Perkins and Willie Big Eyes Smith a couple of years before they passed Q Do you have any plans to perform again with Mud Or plans to perhaps record together There are no plans in the immediate future Mud Morganfield left Big Bill Morganfield receive Chicago Blues Hall of Fame awards on behalf of their father Muddy Waters Photo Dianne Bruce Dunklau Q You don t perform in Chicago very often But when you do come to town is there anything special that you like to do here Do you have family members in Chicago I have family there in Chicago I always love seeing my younger brother Joe Morganfield when I come to Chicago I love it when Buddy is in town because I get a chance to say hi He is one of my musical heroes and I love to just see him L to R Mud Morganfield Big Bill Morganfield Joe Morganfield at the Chicago Blues Hall of Fame awards Photo Lynn Orman Q Your new CD Blues With A Mood received a rave review from Chicago Blues Guide and other publications You recorded it down in Nashville the country music capitol of the world But these days Nashville s studios seem to be attracting a number of blues artists with greats like Buddy Guy and Lonnie Brooks making records down there What prompted you to head to Tennessee to make Blues With A Mood Well it s a long story but it basically had to do with me needing a great studio to record the new disc The studio I had reserved in Charleston called my engineer and said that I was being kicked out because a more famous guy needed the studio to finish a project You would think that my 50 deposit was good enough to lock things in but it wasn t In looking back they did me a great favor Q How does

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