archive-com.com » COM » C » CHNINTERNATIONAL.COM

Total: 294

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Stigma Hurts Patients
    due to the disease s name I think the name itself offends patients and it doesn t help them in terms of having people they know or anyone they contact believe that they are really sick It sounds just like a symptom said Dr Lea Steele who is with the Kansas Commission on Veterans Affairs in Topeka Kansas A growing number of chronic fatigue syndrome patients have been calling for a name change A vocal group claims the disease is given little respect and even funding efforts are harmed because the name implies that the patients are just fatigued and do not have a serious illness Many physicians attending the American Association for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome AACFS 5th International Conference said that most patients find the name to be unacceptable because it focuses too heavily on only one easily misunderstood symptom About 30 years ago multiple sclerosis patients were subject to this same type of stigma when people referred to MS as hysterical paralysis Steele commented I have felt for many years that the term chronic fatigue syndrome which came in 1988 was something that was a trivial name said Dr Leonard Jason from DePaul University in Chicago Illinois If I said you had chronic cough syndrome you would probably think that is kind of trivial But if I said you have tuberculosis you would probably say well that is serious Jason conducted a study with almost 100 medical students and found that the name made a difference and if it were changed to something more descriptive of the condition then patients would be considered more disabled and ultimately receive better care The syndrome is trivialized by many people and yet it is a very serious condition One way of rectifying that is to change the name he said Currently

    Original URL path: http://www.chninternational.com/cfidspage.htm (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Comment by Nancy Valko
    moods at various times throughout the day For comparison a group of healthy volunteers used the same devices When researchers tabulated the results they found that the levels of happiness were about the same for the two groups The researchers led by Dr Jason Riis of Princeton when he was a graduate student at the University of Michigan also found that the healthy people greatly overestimated how unhappy the sick ones would be And the sick people overestimated how happy healthy ones would be For most of us the authors write it would take a lot more than we think to make us permanently miserable For the study 49 kidney disease patients who were undergoing dialysis sessions three times a week were given personal digital assistants as were 49 healthy volunteers matched to the patients by age race education and sex When the devices beeped the subjects were asked to rate their mood on a 5 point scale with 2 defined as very pleasant and minus 2 defined as very unpleasant On average the kidney patients rated their mood as 0 70 while the healthy subjects rated it as 0 83 The participants were also asked to describe other emotions

    Original URL path: http://www.chninternational.com/health%20happiness%20not%20always%20linked.htm (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Cone snail venom Attacking Pain
    the venom and identified one peptide a short chain of amino acids that stopped nerve cells sending signals to the brain It acts by blocking the calcium channels on the nerves that transmit pain signals Once the channels are blocked calcium cannot enter the cells and pain signals are blocked from travelling between nerve cells Prialt was licensed in Europe by Elan which sold it to Eisai a Japanese pharmaceutical company best known in Britain for the Alzheimer drug Aricept There may be more to come from the cone snail Professor Olivera believes There are 500 different types and each produces as many as 100 toxins in its venom He hopes that they will provide compounds to treat a wide range of conditions from Parkinson s disease to depression Source The deadly sea snail venom that will take away your pain Cone snail venom Attacking Pain For millions of chronic pain sufferers big relief could come from a small sea snail This ScienCentral News video has more Please use your back button to return to CHN after visiting the numerous hyperlinks on this page Attacking Aches and Pains It strikes without warning harpooning its prey and injecting a toxic cocktail that paralyzes its victim Despite its small size only a few inches in length predatory cone snails wield a venom weapon deadly enough to kill a human Together the chemicals in a cone snail s venom do serious damage but each one on its own can actually do some good Cone snail venom is just one example of toxic tinctures researchers are turning into therapeutic treatments for chronic pain One such drug called Prialt is poised for approval by the US Food and Drug Administration this fall Roughly 50 million people in the United States suffer from pain lasting more than three to six months There s been a big venom movement in the chronic pain field says Michel Dubois director of NYU Medical Center s Pain Program That s some kind of reflection on the fact that our patients are quite desperate for treatment According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke chronic pain is usually caused by nerve signals misfiring in the central nervous system that continuously send pain messages to the brain Many chronic patients have tried a host of treatments ranging from physical therapy to electrostimulation to heavy duty drugs like morphine Morphine is the gold stallion for any analgesics says Dubois It is very effective on pain and any new drug will likely be tested against morphine The problem with morphine in addition to side effects like constipation and nausea for example is its addictive nature People build up a tolerance to the drug and need more and more of it to kill any pain Venom based medications can have their own side effects like dizziness but patients don t build up a tolerance to the drug Prialt is as effective the first day as the thirtieth day says Toto Olivera who pioneered research on cone snail venom some 20 years ago A 19 year old undergraduate first isolated the chemical called ziconotide on which this drug is based back in the early 1980s We were just trying to figure out why cone snails were able to use their venom to paralyze their prey and why certain snail killed people So it was really a basic science investigation and we never dreamt when we started that it would lead to a therapeutic application No Pain on the Brain We feel pain because pain fibers carry an electrical signal to the spinal cord and then that signal is transmitted across a gap a synapse to a nerve cell that then sends a signal to the brain explains Olivera In order to communicate across that gap the key thing is the electrical signal has to be converted into a chemical signal What is important is that calcium enters the end of the pain fiber to allow the chemical signal to be released Administered in the right dose ziconotide blocks the calcium gateways so the chemical pain signal never crosses the synapse It blocks the transmission of the chemical across the gap the synapse continues Olivera As a result you don t perceive any pain because your brain isn t receiving the signal Prialt was tested in human clinical trials over the past few years One volunteer Brian Braun started using the drug in 1999 after suffering 10 years of excruciating pain that left him in a wheelchair I couldn t walk says Braun The pain just got overwhelming Braun s chronic pain resulted as a delayed complication to back surgery he had in 1974 The pain began about 1989 he says They treated me with heavy steroids all types of drugs and that didn t do any good Then I had an implanted stimulator for three years then they started me on morphine for a good many years but morphine just wasn t doing it On Prialt Braun slowly regained mobility and no longer needs his wheelchair He says he cooks and cleans and even cuts the grass Not everyone has enjoyed Braun s success with ziconotide but his doctor Michel Dubois is happy to see such a good response If this drug has changed his life says Dubois this is a major step forward in the modalities available to our patients This drug is not for everyone but it is definitely useful for a few selected patients who are desperately in need of help Meanwhile Toto Olivera will continue to sift through the more than 50 000 individual chemicals found in the venom of the 500 different species of cone snails His recent review of cone snail venoms was published in the January 2004 issue of Physiological Reviews and the study was funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and the Biofuture Prize for the German Ministry of Education and Research Source http www sciencentral com articles view php3 language english type

    Original URL path: http://www.chninternational.com/cone_snail_venom_attacking_pain.htm (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Sufentanil preferred for Cancer pain

    (No additional info available in detailed archive for this subpage)
    Original URL path: /sufentanil_preferred_for_cancer_.htm (2016-02-17)


  • Chronic pain as a disease
    a personal experience and cannot be measured like other problems in medicine such as a broken leg or an infection For instance a broken leg can be confirmed by an X ray and an infection by a blood test measuring white blood cell count Unfortunately there is no medical test to measure pain levels To make matters more challenging for the patient for many chronic pain problems there is no objective evidence or physical findings to explain the pain Thus many back pain sufferers go from one doctor to the next searching for explanations This process can lead to unnecessary evaluations and treatments in addition to putting the patient at risk for actually being harmed or made worse by the healthcare profession Everyone experiences and expresses pain differently Two people with the exact same injury will feel and show their pain in unique ways depending on a number of things such as The situation in which the pain occurs Thoughts about the pain such as this is nothing serious versus this pain could kill me Emotions associated with the pain such as depression and anxiety versus hopefulness and optimism Cultural influences determining whether a person is to be more stoic or more dramatic in showing pain to others The newest theories of pain can now explain on a physiological level how and why people experience pain differently Types of pain Acute Chronic and Neuropathic Pain Understanding how pain is defined is important in order to learn how to better control it For the purposes of research and medical practice pain can be separated into three categories Acute pain Chronic pain Neuropathic pain Acute pain Acute pain is currently defined as pain lasting less than 3 to 6 months or pain that is directly related to tissue damage This is the kind of pain that is experienced from a paper cut or needle prick Other examples of acute pain include Touching a hot stove or iron This pain will cause a fast immediate intense pain with an almost simultaneous withdrawal of the body part that is being burned More of an aching pain might be experience a few seconds after the initial pain and withdrawal Smashing one s finger with a hammer This pain is similar to that of touching a hot stove in that there is immediate pain withdrawal and then slower aching pain Labor pains The pain during childbirth is acute and the cause is certainly identifiable The longer pain goes on the more susceptible it is to other influences and developing into a chronic pain problem These influences include such things as the ongoing pain signal input to the nervous system even without tissue damage lack of exercise physical deconditioning a person s thoughts about the pain as well as emotional states such as depression and anxiety Chronic pain There are at least two different types of chronic pain problems chronic pain due to an identifiable pain generator e g an injury and chronic pain with no identifiable

    Original URL path: http://www.chninternational.com/chronic_pain_as_a_disease.htm (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Puffer fish promises pain relief
    told the WCR It s been a long while since we d had something that is new for the pain so in fact if this proves to be safe and effective it s going to offer the public with cancer another alternative for pain management Given the nature of the medication thorough investigation is required Oneschuk noted You don t want to prematurely put out a medication that is potentially not safe or isn t effective The criteria for a patient to be admitted into the research test are strict A patient must have a poor response to more traditional pain treatment and a lengthy list of other criteria may exclude a patient A patient must also have a suitable longevity plus no other medication that could contribute to any significant complication that may overlap with the effects of this particular medication At this stage researchers are looking not only at how effective it is but also how safe it is The most common side effect usually is numbness and tingling either around the mouth or at the arms and legs But other wise it tends to be quite well tolerated Oneschuk said The toxin is a sodium channel blocking compound which acts to put brakes on electrochemical nerve signal transmission and reduce pain What makes it different from other anesthetics and painkillers is that it appears the toxin does not yield side effects associated with other drugs including dependency and drowsiness If poor pain relief leads a patient to decide to have doctor assisted suicide with the availability of this drug such a scenario can be avoided That s possible in some circumstances because poor pain relief may contribute to a patients request to have euthanasia the palliative care doctor said The study will be open until the manufacturers

    Original URL path: http://www.chninternational.com/puffer_fish_promises_pain_relief.htm (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Research Shows Way To Boost Morphine
    new drug combinations to safely reduce tolerance to morphine for people suffering from severe chronic pain A conventional test of analgesic effect is to test a laboratory rat s heat sensitivity to a few second exposure to a beam of non burning laser light directed at the tail Normally rats actively flick their tails when they feel the heat Rats given morphine showed much less sensitivity to the heat but after four days they became tolerant to morphine s analgesic effect and flicked their tails indicating they could feel the heat despite the morphine But when rats were given both morphine and the opioid DAMGO known to induce endocytosis of cell surface receptors they felt no heat for the seven day duration of the test To confirm their hypothesis that it was the increased endocytosis that blocked tolerance to the morphine the researchers examined the cells of the spinal cord in both the experimental and control rats Their focus was the mu opioid receptors MOR that morphine normally activates on the cell surface In those rats that had been given only morphine and who became tolerant to morphine in four days the MOR receptors had remained predominantly on the cell surface But in those that had been administered morphine and also DAMGO to facilitate endocytosis opioid receptors were detected throughout the cell evidence that the receptors had been removed from the cell surface under the influence of DAMGO These animals did not become tolerant to morphine at all There may already be other opioid drugs that when used in conjunction with morphine would reduce the development of tolerance Whistler said Many of these drugs are not used for pain because of the side effects they produce at high doses The key here is that our results predict that one could co administer them at very low doses with morphine avoiding side effects and enhancing the analgesic effects of morphine Research is mounting that opioid cell surface receptors chemically interact with each other or oligomerize Whistler s research group has evidence from the cell culture experiments that the MOR receptor oligomerizes and this is the property that allows a MOR docked with DAMGO to latch on to a MOR docked with morphine and drag it down from the cell surface to be recycled In the Cell paper the researchers suggest that morphine s normal trait of failing to facilitate endocytosis and therefore failing to recycle the receptors is partially responsible for the cell s inability to continue responding to the drug Whistler cautions that the development of tolerance is a complex multi step process which requires more study It is important to remember she says that tolerance is likely mediated by multiple processes and that tolerance develops to many drugs not just opiates We hope our work will stimulate our colleagues to investigate the fate of their favorite receptors when they are bound to a drug Lead author of the paper is Li He MD a UCSF postdoctoral fellow in Whistler

    Original URL path: http://www.chninternational.com/research_shows_way_to_boost_morp.htm (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • pain and undertreatment of pain
    in pain management It is now accepted by practitioners of the specialty of pain medicine that respiratory depression induced by opioids tends to be a short lived phenomenon generally occurs only in the opioid naive patient and is antagonized by pain Therefore withholding the appropriate use of opioids from a patient who is experiencing pain on the basis of respiratory concerns is unwarranted Other side effects such as constipation can usually be managed by attention to diet along with the regular use of stool softeners and laxatives Sedation and nausea possible early side effects usually dissipate with continued use Current information and experience suggest that many commonly held assumptions need modification Studies indicate that the de novo development of addiction when opioids are used for the relief of pain is low Diversion of controlled substances should be a concern of every health professional but efforts to stop diversion should not interfere with prescribing opioids for pain management The mission of the American Pain Society is to serve people in pain by advancing research education treatment and professional practice The undertreatment of pain in today s society is not justified This joint consensus statement has been produced pursuant to the missions of both organizations to help foster a practice environment in which opioids may be used appropriately to reduce needless suffering from pain The above are excerpts only For complete text visit the source at http www ampainsoc org advocacy opioids htm top Pain and Suffering in History Narratives of Science Medicine and Culture In 1998 an exhibit was prepared in conjunction with the Symposium Pain and Suffering in History Narratives of Science Medicine and Culture The symposium and the exhibit marked the official dedication of the John C Liebeskind History of Pain Collection at the Louise M Darling Biomedical Library

    Original URL path: http://www.chninternational.com/pain_and_undertreatment_of_pain.htm (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive



  •