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  • A Biomechanical Review of the Swing Block – Volleyball Coach Chuck Rey | Volleyball Blog | College Volleyball Coach
    swing is completed when the left heel is planted on the floor parallel to the net The foot is planted in a heel toe position with the toes at 45 degrees to the center line When the left foot is planted the knees and hips are flexed and the trunk is flexed forward Following the left foot plant the right foot is brought forward and placed beside the left Figure 6 This position should be close to the ideal position for a jump takeoff As the right leg is swung forward with the knee flexed to ninety degrees and planted beside the left the arms swing forward and upward to assist the jump Figure 6 Vertical jump performance may be enhanced by rapidly squatting down at foot plant prior to the propulsive phase of the jump This lowering sequence in which the knees and hips are flexed to close to ninety degrees and the trunk is flexed forward is called the counter movement because it occurs in the direction that is counter or opposite to the direction of the desired movement Vint 2005 During the descent of the counter movement squatting movement the hips knees and ankles are flexed into positions that stretch the muscles that will soon act to extend those same joints during the upward phase of the jump This prestretch of the muscles and elastic tissues of the joints will increase the force of the extension movements at takeoff by storing elastic energy from the stretch to be released at recoil of the structures Figure 6 As well this stretch of the muscles will fire the stretch reflex for muscle contraction in which a forceful stretch will fire the muscle spindles in the stretched muscles to cause the muscle to contract more forcefully This deep squat will also increase the distance over which force can be exerted by the muscle thereby prolonging the upward propulsion phase However each athlete likely has an optimal depth of crouch that will produce the highest jump depending on their strength height and fast twitch muscle fibre percentage Vint 2005 Coaches should observe their blockers to note which ones might employ too little or too much of a crouch based on their strength and jumping characteristics prior to the block jump Figure 6 At the end of the crossover the right foot is brought forward beside the left and both feet are angled close to 45 degrees to the center line The body is moving downward for the counter movement The arms are being accelerated upward at a very high velocity to load the legs for the jump Figure 7 Midway through the extension for the jump the arms are flexed above the head the trunk is extended and the knees and hips are approaching full extension Figure 8 At takeoff for the jump the arms legs and trunk are fully extended although in this athlete the body is tilted to the left due to an off center takeoff There is some controversy regarding the position of the arms during the arm swing for takeoff in the block jump or the amount of arm swing to use when blocking Some coaches prefer that the blocker does not use a full arm swing but just keep the hands at shoulder level during the sideways movement and just drop the arms slightly during the stop prior to driving them upward This short backswing will keep the arms in position to stop a fast hit and the arms may be less likely to contact the net during the takeoff The smaller arm swing will reduce the risk of jumping late and being late in getting the hands over the net to block since it is better to be early than late One author has suggested that the volleyball blocking is unique among jumping skills in that the blocker is prohibited from using an extensive arm swing because of the proximity to the net Vint 2005 It has been suggested that a vigorous arm swing may improve jumping performance by about 10 per cent so this technique needs to be more carefully considered by coaches Elite volleyball blockers are more likely to use an arm swing for the block jump than less skilled players The limited arm swing technique will not use the arm swing to fully utilize the acceleration of the arms in increasing the ground reaction forces for the jump Players with a longer and more forceful arm swing will load the legs for the jump more effectively As the arms are swung upwards from the vertical position the upward arm movement pushes downward on the shoulder joints which increase the downward forces on the hips the knees and ankles and increase the depth of crouch and finally the floor These increased downward forces on the ground will produce increased upward forces on the athlete for the jump increasing vertical velocity at takeoff and increasing the height of the jump Figure 8 The height of the jump is also increased by raising the height of the center of gravity at takeoff as this height is added to the eventual height of the jump The blocker should be fully extended in the legs and trunk and the arms should be extended well above the head for takeoff The higher the arms are raised and the more vertical their position at takeoff the higher the center of gravity and the greater the eventual height of the jump Figure 8 The position of maximum knee flexion and hip flexion occurs as the arms are moved upwards forcefully using shoulder flexion movements as well the elbows are almost fully extended As the arms are swung upwards the trunk is extended upwards and hip and knee extension begins The upward arm swing consists of shoulder flexion to a position in which the hands are above the head the shoulders are fully flexed and the elbows are extended Figure 9 After this point the knee hip and trunk extension continue until all the joints are fully extended at takeoff At takeoff the toes are still angled close to 45 degrees to the net and the hips and trunk are also angled to the right Since the blocker is moving sideways into the block the most effective foot position for stopping is to place the feet at 45 degrees to the direction of travel Figure 9 At peak height the trunk is flexed and the shoulders are extended to angle the arms downward to deflect the ball into the opponent s court The hips are also flexed in order to take up the torques produced by the upper body At takeoff the trunk is rotated from facing to the right to facing to the left to move the body into a position facing the net The torque produced by the feet pushing the body in a CCW direction produces angular momentum in the body at takeoff and this angular momentum rotates the body to face the net at peak height However this angular momentum is retained by the body throughout the airborne phase so the body continues to rotate to the left while airborne sometimes causing the blocker to land in a position facing towards the left side At takeoff the trunk and legs are fully extended the shoulders are fully flexed and the hands are reaching as high as possible overhead The palms are facing the net and the fingers are fully extended to cover as much of the area over the net as possible As the blocker approaches peak height the hands reach forward over the top of the net penetration to attempt to deflect the ball downward into the opponent s court following contact The movements that produce reaching over the net consist of shoulder extension and trunk flexion are a very important aspect of player technique Figure 9 The further over the net the player can reach the more effective the block in deflecting the ball downward following contact The shoulder extension and trunk flexion at contact is accompanied by hip flexion to take up the torques produced by the shoulder extension this produces the characteristic jack knife position in the air Figure 10 For every action torque produced in the air there is an equal and opposite reaction torque about the same axis of rotation in this case it is the left right axis of the blocker Figure 10 The side view shows the jack knife position of the blocker at peak height with the arms extended over the net and the legs flexed at the hips under the net This position is also effective because it has increased the resistance to rotation around the longitudinal axis while airborne Another useful aspect of piking in the air by the blocker is the fact that this position also increases the moment of inertia or resistance to rotation about the longitudinal axis about which angular momentum was created at takeoff The greater the resistance to rotation about this axis the less the tendency of the blocker to rotate while in the air and the greater the chance of a balanced landing on both feet on the same spot as takeoff This position will also assist the blocker in squaring up to the net for the block by decreasing the amount of rotation occurring while airborne The right leg may also be seen to flex forward of the trunk after the block Figure 11 which also increases the moment of inertia about the long axis and helps to decrease rotation while airborne The blocker must try to ensure that the trunk is square to the net at peak height in order to present the largest possible surface of the arms for the block The blocker must then angle the arms downward to deflect the ball into the court and angle the arms slightly toward the middle of the court to keep the ball in the court Hammon 2005a This is seen in Figure 9 in which the blocker has the arms angled toward the left to help keep the ball in court after the block Figure 11 On the left side of the court the two blockers land from a block The blocker on the right is incorrectly landing on one foot producing high stresses on that leg Both blockers experienced significant drift to the left during the block jump After peak height is reached the blocker must move the arms back upwards shoulder flexion to the vertical to ensure that no net contact is made on the way down As the arms and trunk move backwards in a counterclockwise direction the legs move backwards in a clockwise direction around the left right axis to keep the sum of the torques in the airborne body constant The player should try to land on both feet at the same time close to the spot from which takeoff occurred Figure 11 Landing on close to the same spot will help ensure that there is no forward drift associated with the jump that would tend to move the blocker into the net However most skilled blockers are seen to move toward the sideline in the direction of the original motion while airborne due to the horizontal velocity toward the sideline they had at takeoff After landing the player resumes their ready position facing the net with the hands held at shoulder height in preparation for the next block Long Crossover Step to Block Jump Another technique often used by highly skilled volleyball middle blockers is to take just one long crossover step to the side followed by the trail leg moving forward to be placed beside the crossover foot in preparation for the jump This technique differs from the previous technique in that the player does not take the initial long shuffle step onto the leg on the side closest to the sideline The blocker simply pivots on this foot and takes the first long step onto the foot closest to the middle making this a crossover step Since the middle blocker and the outside blocker take only one step from the middle to the side of the court for the block this must be a very long step and requires a powerful push off by the middle blocker Shorter or less powerful players may not be able to make this one long step into position to block This technique was found to have the fastest time from start to leaving the ground on the spike jump a time of 1 13 s for the middle blocker Figure 12 Two blockers in ready position at the net watching the set to determine in which direction they have to move Arms are extended above the head and legs are flexed and wider than shoulder width apart to enable faster sideways movement The ideal ready position for skilled blocking isto squarely face the net with the legs wider than shoulder apart and the arms extended well above the head Figure 12 From this ready position facing squarely forward the middle blocker moving to the left side of the court will first make a slight adjustment in the position of the left foot so that the left toes are pointing to the left Figure 13 This movement consists of lateral rotation of the left hip As the left foot is placed in the sideways position the right leg is extending and driving the body to the left to start the crossover step This drive from the right leg is critical in starting the motion of the blocker in the direction of the impending spike Figure 13 The two blockers react to the set to the left side the middle blocker is driving off the right leg to move sideways while the outside blocker has started the crossover by weighting the right foot Following the drive from the right leg the knee and hip are flexed and the leg is lifted from the floor and driven forcefully across the body toward the left As the right leg is driven across the body the left leg continues to drive forcefully from the floor to increase the length of this crossover step As the right leg is driving sideways to the left side of the court and the left leg is driving off the floor the arms are drawn back for the backswing Figure 14 The arms reach their position of maximum hyperextension as the right heel strikes the floor this position is also seen in the stop for the spike jump and the jump serve In a skilled blocker the arms can reach the horizontal position at the top of the backswing As the left leg drives up off the floor the body enters the airborne phase in which there is no contact with the floor until the right heel contacts the floor at the end of the crossover step Figure 14 The outside blocker is planting the right foot for the jump while the middle blocker is still pushing off the left foot prior to the right foot plant The right leg is planted well in front of the body with the toe placed at 45 degrees to the center line and the trunk still facing toward the left Figure 15 The arms are left well behind the body in the backswing position in a form of inertial lag in which the arms are left behind the rapidly moving trunk The left leg is also left behind the body as the right heel is planted and then the arms and the left leg move forward toward the left side of the court in unison In a highly skilled player the angular velocity of the arms in shoulder flexion is similar to that of the swinging left leg in hip flexion so these limbs appear to move forward together Figure 15 The middle blocker is planting his right foot for the stop while the arms and left leg are swinging through for the plant The outside blocker has already started the upward portion of the jump as feet are planted and arms are driving upward The left foot is then placed to the left side of the body beside the planted right foot Figure 16 As the left foot lands the arms are vertical and parallel to the trunk and they continue upward into flexion as the knees and hips continue to flex slightly The action of the arms is to assist with loading the legs by increasing hip and knee flexion during the upward swing of the arms The left foot lands beside the right at close to the time of completion of the downward portion of the arm swing The timing is that the left leg moves forward with the arms as they are swung forward and as the left foot is planted the arms have begun their upward excursion for the jump The feet are now shoulder width apart with the toes angled about 45 degrees to the net The knees and hips are flexed and the trunk is flexed forward about 30 degrees to the vertical when the left leg is planted In a good blocker the knees and hips are flexed close to 90 degrees at their lowest position some taller blockers will not attain the same low position at the beginning of the jump as they do not require the same jump height to reach an optimal height above the net to block However it is desirable for all players to use greater hip and knee flexion to maximize their jump height for the block and coaches should emphasize the lowest possible position prior to the jump Figure 16 The middle blocker is in mid takeoff with knees and hips extending while the outside blocker is at takeoff Differences in height and jumping ability will affect takeoff times so that both blockers do not always take off at the same instant From the low position of the jump crouch the upward

    Original URL path: http://coachrey.com/volleyball-skills/a-biomechanical-review-of-the-swing-block/ (2016-04-26)
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  • A Quantitative Analysis of the Most Important Volleyball Skills – Volleyball Coach Chuck Rey | Volleyball Blog | College Volleyball Coach
    events were assumed to be first order Markov chains meaning the quality of the performance of the current skill only depended on the quality of the performance of the previous skill We analyze the volleyball data using two different techniques one uses a Markovian transition matrix while the other is an implementation of logistic regression To estimate the Markovian transition matrix we assumed a multinomial likelihood with a Dirichlet prior on the transition probabilities The logistic regression model also uses a Bayesian approach The posterior distributions of parameters associated with skill performance are used to calculate importance scores Importance scores produced by the two methods are reasonably consistent across skills The importance scores indicate among other things that the team would have been well rewarded by improving transition offense Importance scores can be used to assist coaches in allocating practice time developing new strategies and optimizing team performance relative to player selection Here is the article in it s entirety Skill Importance in Volleyball Results Based on these analyses we would give the following recommendations to this team 1 Keep sets and passes away from the net 2 Force the attack to the middle and right side if at all possible 3 Devote a considerable proportion of practice time to transition o ense 4 Get to blocking positions more quickly following a serve We have shown two di fferent methodologies to develop skill importance scores These importance scores can be used by coaches to change team tac tics change skill performance goals and focus practice time to increase the probability of scoring points Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window Related Brigham Young University Gold Medal Squared University

    Original URL path: http://coachrey.com/volleyball-skills/a-quantitative-analysis-of-the-most-important-volleyball-skills/ (2016-04-26)
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  • The Lost Art of Shot-Making – Volleyball Coach Chuck Rey | Volleyball Blog | College Volleyball Coach
    bail out move This attitude must be one of sheer joy watching the frustration of the blockers and diggers grow to the point of total collapse and the opposing coaches throwing up their arms without any answer for the onslaught much like we did in the match I just described When asked What age should you start teaching shots the answer is The younger the better There are some basics that you need to have in place like a good arm swing and footwork to really sell the shot but as soon as these skills are in place it is never too soon Younger players are less likely to be successful in crushing the ball until they are of a certain height but anyone can use shots to get points on the board regardless of age or height The other advantage is that by the time they are able to swing away at the 3 meter line you will have created wily creative smart hitters Shot definitions include Tipping open hand movement of the ball directed above or around the blockers usually landing short in the court This can be expanded into deep court tips and power tipping Chipping open hand soft topspin or side spin shots directed over or around the block landing in the open court short or behind the defense Hitting Line full swing with either shoulder s squared to the line shot or swinging across the hitter s body towards the line Soft into the Block hitting the ball softly off the block to avoid being stuffed and allowing your coverage to play the ball up for another attempt at an attack Tooling hitting chipping or tipping off the hands of the blockers Sharp Cross Court hitting inside the block and closer to the net than the cross court digger as close to or inside the 3 meter line as possible Roll Shot same as chipping but could be top spin or side spin to put direction on the ball into areas with more pace than a chip There are many ways to teach these shots but one of the best methods is to let the players try them in traditional hitting drills By modifying the drill to reward the shots and placement rather than the ball s hitting the floor at a high rate of speed you will see steady progress in your players skills Here are a few examples Tool the Fool Place a couple of players on a box to simulate a double block Let the hitter tool wipe throw tip the ball in all directions and positions on the court This will teach creativity technique and vision Short Court Run a power tipping drill with 6 vs 6 inside the 3 meter line The goals are to work on transition coverage and shots Start with a cooperative roll over the net and score it just like any short court game You can also double the points anytime they execute a particular shot

    Original URL path: http://coachrey.com/volleyball-skills/the-lost-art-of-shot-making/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Keys to Blocking Effectively – Volleyball Coach Chuck Rey | Volleyball Blog | College Volleyball Coach
    penetrate control the net Block from a stationary position Block aggressively not randomly Blocks often come in bunches be patient Get touches touches touches control and stuff Never give up a straight down hit A girl on the Low Country Club Team that I coached asked for my advice What tip do you find most helpful Here is my answer To me they are all helpful tips but it is almost impossible to think through all these tips in the middle of a set when you are about to block That is why repetition in practice is key Repetition builds each one of these steps into a habit so you don t have to think about these tips They will come automatically Blocking is 95 work and 5 natural ability It is about timing and attitude If you WANT to block and dig for that matter you will be more successful because of this innate WANT But if I have to pick one tip my favorite is Remember the last shot your opponent hit After you become physically and fundamentally sound in volleyball strategy and the mental part of the game becomes a greater factor If an opponent hits an angle shot successfully straight down that opponent will likely try to hit that same shot again because it was successful Your opponent is building confidence in themselves and their entire team builds confidence On the flip side if the opponent tries to hit angle and we stuff them They will likely change their hit for the next swing and their confidence is deflated and so is the teams If an opponent has a successful hit our goal is to take that shot away from them on the next hit So if they hit angle let s block a bigger or

    Original URL path: http://coachrey.com/volleyball-skills/keys-to-blocking-effectively/ (2016-04-26)
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  • The Volleyball Spike | How Can I Spike Harder! – Volleyball Coach Chuck Rey | Volleyball Blog | College Volleyball Coach
    for superior learning remembering Since we learn best from gamelike things the ideal hitting drill is a pass set hit drill or a dig set hit drill Not off of tosses or a machine Off of live sets If you don t have a teammate sure set yourself and hit it over the net High sets are the hardest to time and learn from Yet that is the ball most kids start with supposedly to get more time to figure out where the ball is falling and give time to get there The lower the set the less speed the ball is falling through the sweet spot hitting zone The high sets come down ripping through this sweet strike zone and players most often hit them into the net Use the wall right Most players love to bang the ball repetitively against the wall What coaches have told me is that it develops wrist snap Nope it is developing the negative error the bad miss of hitting into the net or block Just like our friend pepper does What they need to get are reps hitting OVER the net with wrist snap of course not into the net So get them to set themselves and hit above a 7 4 mark and grab the rebound to redo that motion as that is a swing worth knowing how to hit over the net or even over the block and in Why is it so hard to hit at full extension Please don t be a coach who then says Reach Get on top of the ball Don t drop your elbow and variations on those technique comments First check for understanding by having the player show you their armswing without the ball If the player swings with a bent elbow or down by their ear they do not understand the technique If they show you full extension they understand the technique and what they SHOULD do The challenge is to do it up in the air ball moving one way player another as the third hit of the team most the time They often make errors of anticipation and judgment and by the time they are ready to rip on the ball it has fallen for the ball cannot hover like a golden snitch it keeps falling The end result players drop their elbow or swing low The solution Swing sooner or swing faster It comes back to timing Jump serve This lets you set yourself develop an over the net armswing and unleash a lot of power It is a closed motor program so you will time things better than when someone is surprising you with their set variations You control the set the height distance etc You likely will get better faster with the jump serve than your spike Even if young jump serving lets you crank on the ball so never give up just keep swinging Stop always hitting the way you are facing While this is not

    Original URL path: http://coachrey.com/volleyball-skills/volleyball-spike-spike-harder/ (2016-04-26)
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  • The Art of Passing a Volleyball – Volleyball Coach Chuck Rey | Volleyball Blog | College Volleyball Coach
    jump serve or float serve Great pitchers in baseball like Phil and Joe Neikro and Tim Wakefield have Hall of Fame Careers baffling batters with their knuckleball pitch the movement is similar to a float serve Opposing batters hit 250 against these great pitchers that s 2 5 successful at bats for every 10 attempts yet we in volleyball demand excellence of our serve receive passers 700 or 7 out of 10 perfect passes against wicked float knuckleball like movement serves It is my opinion that the great players of our game especially those with great ball control are the ones that grow up around the game Karch Kiraly and Misty May watched their parents play on the beach before they were big enough to play with them When they were finally big enough they primarily passed and played defense because they still weren t big enough to hit the ball over the net This experience that makes their movements an effortless thoughtless habit So what can you do to become a great passer if you weren t lucky enough to have parents that used your crib railing as a net First is to know understand and successfully apply on a consistent basis the motor movements of passing Books have been written discussing these movements but here are some generalities Smooth balanced footwork to the point where you will intercept the flight of the volleyball Recognizing when to center the ball on your body versus reaching out to pass a ball off your side Understanding the platform angles around the volleyball court For instance the closer you are to the net the more parallel your arms are to the floor The closer your platform is to the sidelines the greater the angle to the setting target Learning the touch and

    Original URL path: http://coachrey.com/volleyball-skills/the-art-of-passing-a-volleyball/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Blocking to the AVP Tour with Jon Guida – Part II – Volleyball Coach Chuck Rey | Volleyball Blog | College Volleyball Coach
    hands and fingers reaching forward and then with your thumbs to the sky and see which technique afforts the better block Or just do it there while you read this Blocking should be an artform technique and should completely dominate a game with a good blocker but sadly it s the least worked on of all skills and the proper outlook and technique isn t used Harold Johnson October 7 2009 at 4 18 pm Comments on your opinion of Phil Dalhausser and blocking Phil IS NOT the best blocker in the world he is simply the biggest blocker on the tour A guy his size should average 3 4 blocks a game EVERY game and completely change the game Much of his form is good to great however his form is not perfect as you can see from the pic you supplied 1 His arms are so wide apart that the ball easily fits through That s terrible form 2 His hands fingers are a little turmned out like he s trying to soft block indoors they should be turned in a little more which in turn allows your wrists to bend forward to close in on the ball You can t close in and reach forward to the ball when your fingers hands are stretched outward If he did it correctly he could completely roof most balls hit near him Thumbs to the sky is NOT the way to go here Try reaching over the net to roof a tight ball with your hands and fingers reaching forward and then with your thumbs to the sky and see which technique afforts the better block Or just do it there while you read this Blocking should be an artform technique and should completely dominate a game with a good blocker but sadly it s the least worked on of all skills and the proper outlook and technique isn t used Chuck Rey October 7 2009 at 11 58 pm Harold Thanks for your comment and visiting but with all due respect how can you say Phil Dalhausser IS NOT the best blocker in the world Currently Phil is ranked 1 on the AVP Tour with 2 11 blocks set http www avp com Scores and Stats Men s Statistics aspx At the 2008 Olympics Team USA was 1 in the world in blocks http www nbcolympics com beachvolleyball statistics gender M teamleaders rsc BVM000000 html And in the Gold Medal Match at the Olympics The Thin Beast had nine blocks in the gold medal match including four in a row in the third set That s called domination Chuck Rey October 7 2009 at 4 58 pm Harold Thanks for your comment and visiting but with all due respect how can you say Phil Dalhausser IS NOT the best blocker in the world Currently Phil is ranked 1 on the AVP Tour with 2 11 blocks set http www avp com Scores and Stats Men s Statistics aspx At the 2008 Olympics Team USA was 1 in the world in blocks http www nbcolympics com beachvolleyball statistics gender M teamleaders rsc BVM000000 html And in the Gold Medal Match at the Olympics The Thin Beast had nine blocks in the gold medal match including four in a row in the third set That s called domination Darren February 1 2010 at 12 19 am Chuck and Jon I think that Phil improved his blocking and all around game last season He had a wooping 4 more blocks per game than the next best He wouldn t have such a great statistical advantage if he wasn t an amazing athlete and blocker maybe there is a stat on his setting location since that is not a height based stat so you could see how great of an all around athlete he is You better believe he thinks about the best way to block to get the most stuffs and channels and makes adjustments to improve To Harold Johnson I have seen many GREAT blockers of any size including both Phil and Sean Scott who was on the second best in blocks per game on the AVP last year at an undersized for blocking 6 5 who start with their arms very wide as pictured and bring their hands together like a fan when the ball gets high Their arms are spread and can be kept wide for a deep underarm cut attack by the offense bringing the opposing hand upwards or across to seal the block as if a middle and a setter of different height were sealing off a continuous area in sixes a blocking style I have recently incorporated indoor to great success in my opinion no stats sorry It goes the other way too with a tall setter or opposite setting the block and a late middle the only area to close the block might be right above the net against a cut down the inside of the right side block Hard to explain without diagrams And yes I agree with you Phil s arms look too spread By reading the play or having a cat vs mouse mentality as a blocker especially outdoor you might be in a position where your arms are similar to Jon s but I also agree with Chuck s eval Jon needs to have that left hand pressed into the opponents attacking area cutting off the angles while also angled to direct the ball down and into the middle of the offense s court warming hands at a campfire is a great analogy I would also suggest that Jon s block is not a patient blocking style if he was blocking angle I feel he should have his body better positioned into the angle more straight up and down if blocking line then also more upright ready for the high roll which it looks like he is barely getting It almost looks like he is blocking ball and I am not

    Original URL path: http://coachrey.com/volleyball-skills/blocking-to-the-avp-tour-with-jon-guida-part-ii/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Volleyball Setting Qualities – Volleyball Coach Chuck Rey | Volleyball Blog | College Volleyball Coach
    and sets the correct hitter not their favorite hitter in all situations in order to win a point set or match It is the end result that the team is trying to achieve and it is the setter s responsibility to make sure the team stays on course Intelligence The setter asserts the coach s game plan thoughts and ideas on to the court The setter sets the team offense based on research and percentages but trusts their emotion and knows when to take a calculated risk The setter reads the opponents block defense match characteristics and adjusts to the flow of the game and sets the tempo The setter knows when to push the team how to direct the team and how to pick up the team The setter will set the emotion and tone on the court that the players will follow The setter will understand they are the example The setter must always keep the goal in mind and express it to the team In the future I hope to post those past documents from the great coaches of our game If you have any piece to share I would appreciate the opportunity to view them Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window Related Arie Selinger Chuck Erbe Doug Beal John Dunning John Kessel USA Volleyball volleyball setting 2009 04 22 Chuck Rey tweet Previous FIVB Olympic Video Clips and Team Analysis Next College Volleyball Statistics Final Four Top 10 and Top 25 5 comments a hargett May 4 2009 at 10 24 pm This is interesting and of course I agree But what do you think the institution of the libero and the modification of ball handling rules will do to the role of the setter a hargett May 4 2009 at 3 24 pm This is interesting and of course I agree But what do you think the institution of the libero and the modification of ball handling rules will do to the role of the setter Chuck Rey May 6 2009 at 3 27 am Theoretically the libero should make the setter s job easier by providing better passes thus enabling the setter to run a better more efficient offense I have heard rumors that they are considering the libero be allowed to set in front of the 10 line This would put a completely different twist on the libero position It could cause drastic offensive and coaching strategies should a coach choose to use the libero as the primary setter To me it is similar to the DH rule in baseball As for the more lenient ball handling rules I was against them initially I thought the game would become sloppy play ground ball but the intention of the rule was to allow the players to dictate the termination of the play not the referees It is much better for fan

    Original URL path: http://coachrey.com/volleyball-skills/volleyball-setting-qualities/ (2016-04-26)
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