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  • Another American Experience at 80 Lister Ave., Ironbound – The Daily Newarker
    Newark has developed Renaissance on a garbage heap as Johns Hopkins University researcher Eileen McGurty has called it The largest garbage incinerator opened in 1991 to process 930 000 tons of garbage annually Alan Gerson a New York City Council member representing Lower Manhattan complained about the incinerator air Some of the stench and toxins could waft right back to Manhattan on an easterly wind In our local Jersey struggling to dispose of municipal solid garbage the state and the county tried to entice Newark to allow more incinerators by throwing in an employment opportunity a jail also in the Ironbound As adjunct law professor of Seton Hall University Tirza Wahrman observed Another thing going on here is New Jerseyans don t feel a sense of ownership about Newark This typical urban American story will not be completed without mentioning its heroes With some other enduring Ironbound residents a young man Arnold Cohen started the Ironbound Committee Against Toxic Waste in 1983 Among many heroic pushing backs the committee sued the State DEP for its negligent inaction in 1984 In the past three decades his daughter has been born and has recently left home to attend Princeton University while his hair turned grey at the age of 62 I hope that my little Newarker daughter will some day join Arnold s daughter to carry the Committee s battle for a just and clean America Share this Twitter Facebook Google Like this Like Loading Related Author Ken Walker Husband Father Newarker PCA Elder Business Analyst In a glass case of emotion since 1978 View all posts by Ken Walker Author Ken Walker Posted on March 31 2010 Categories Featured Tags Diamond Alkali Passaic River Pollution Zemin Zhang 1 thought on Another American Experience at 80 Lister Ave Ironbound Helen says April 15 2010 at 3 07 am I just found your blog today thanks for maintaining it This is a great source of information I m glad to see that maybe just maybe something will finally be done to clean up this site The lack of environmental justice in Newark especially the ironbound is a crime I used to live in the Ironbound and taught at a school just a stone s throw from this site Though I m in NYC now for grad school I m hoping to work with the ICC over the summer thanks for posting Like Like Reply Leave a Reply Cancel reply Enter your comment here Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in Email required Address never made public Name required Website You are commenting using your WordPress com account Log Out Change You are commenting using your Twitter account Log Out Change You are commenting using your Facebook account Log Out Change You are commenting using your Google account Log Out Change Cancel Connecting to s Notify me of new comments via email Post navigation Previous Previous post Newark s Ironbound An American Experience Next Next post New York Times

    Original URL path: https://dailynewarker.com/2010/03/31/201003another-american-experience-at-80-lister-ave-ironbound/ (2016-04-27)
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  • Diamond Alkali – The Daily Newarker
    s spokesman Carl Golden explained This is not the kind of thing that leads to a quick overnight solution In past 27 years the 65 000 cubic yards of polluted dirt and debris faced a few remedies none of which led to easy solutions According to the company the only place for processing highly contaminated materials is in Coffeyville Kansas with a price tag of 241 million plus transportation that would take seven to ten years A second solution is on site incineration which successfully removed dioxin of lower concentrations 400 parts per billion at Diamond Alkali s other Superfund site in Times Beach Missouri In a more populated urban area the two year decontamination would cost 40 million Not surprisingly in 1998 the responsible corporation Occidental Chemicals took the third route to encase the four acre site with a floodwall and a groundwater treatment system at a cost of 22 million the lowest cost approach Some additional debris was put in 932 cargo containers piled along the Passaic River For more details about the EPA Lower Passaic River cleanup see www ourpassaic org projectsites The EPA approved interim solution thereafter turned to be permanent while the Dallas based company went into its fast global expansion during the Golden Era of massive deregulation under the Bush Administration The CEO Dr Ray Irani has lived a high life in Beverly Hills with a record annual earning of 460 million in 2006 For a bad year he made 59 million in 2009 Meanwhile Newark has developed Renaissance on a garbage heap as Johns Hopkins University researcher Eileen McGurty has called it The largest garbage incinerator opened in 1991 to process 930 000 tons of garbage annually Alan Gerson a New York City Council member representing Lower Manhattan complained about the incinerator air Some of the stench and toxins could waft right back to Manhattan on an easterly wind In our local Jersey struggling to dispose of municipal solid garbage the state and the county tried to entice Newark to allow more incinerators by throwing in an employment opportunity a jail also in the Ironbound As adjunct law professor of Seton Hall University Tirza Wahrman observed Another thing going on here is New Jerseyans don t feel a sense of ownership about Newark This typical urban American story will not be completed without mentioning its heroes With some other enduring Ironbound residents a young man Arnold Cohen started the Ironbound Committee Against Toxic Waste in 1983 Among many heroic pushing backs the committee sued the State DEP for its negligent inaction in 1984 In the past three decades his daughter has been born and has recently left home to attend Princeton University while his hair turned grey at the age of 62 I hope that my little Newarker daughter will some day join Arnold s daughter to carry the Committee s battle for a just and clean America Author Ken Walker Posted on March 31 2010 Categories Featured Tags Diamond Alkali Passaic River

    Original URL path: https://dailynewarker.com/tag/diamond-alkali/ (2016-04-27)
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  • Passaic River – The Daily Newarker
    can be restored Author Ken Walker Posted on April 5 2010 Categories Status Tags Environmental Protection Agency Passaic River Pollution Leave a comment on Star Ledger EPA chief tours N J two worst Superfund sites in Newark Pompton Lakes Another American Experience at 80 Lister Ave Ironbound The EPA director our own Lisa Jackson visited one of the nation s most notorious Superfund sites at 80 Lister Avenue on March 26 promising speedy action towards clean up which will be the first step for Newarkers to reclaim the Passaic riverfront At 11 59 a m on February 20 1960 a huge explosion blew up the roof of the 125 by 250 foot building at 80 Lister Avenue sending tons of toxic debris into the Passaic River and surrounding streets Many workers had to be dug out by fire rescue squads Soon after Alfred Casatelli 35 a chemical engineer died in St James Hospital of chemical poisoning among many others badly injured The chemical factory Diamond Alkali was about to accelerate its 24 7 production schedule to produce one million gallons of Agent Orange for the Vietnam War By the time the factory closed its production in 1983 it left behind a sprawling tomb for the herbicide s toxic byproduct dioxin measuring 500 parts per billion with some samples as high as 1 200 parts per billion The EPA classifies a level of one part per billion as dangerous to humans Producing DDT at the Lister Avenue site for over 40 years Diamond Alkali had ordered its employees to wade out surreptitiously at low tide to chop up mounds of DDT to avoid being detected for dumping waste into the Passaic River On June 4 1983 after a chilling contamination report Governor Kean showed up in the site with Mayor Ken Gibson to order further inspection and to close the nearby Newark Farmers Market the largest seafood supplier in New Jersey in addition to fresh and frozen goods for the tri state area A few months later the Federal Government declared it among the first Superfund Sites However all politicians reporters and lab workers in white moonwalk outfits soon disappeared leaving scared Ironbound residents puzzled Governor Kean s spokesman Carl Golden explained This is not the kind of thing that leads to a quick overnight solution In past 27 years the 65 000 cubic yards of polluted dirt and debris faced a few remedies none of which led to easy solutions According to the company the only place for processing highly contaminated materials is in Coffeyville Kansas with a price tag of 241 million plus transportation that would take seven to ten years A second solution is on site incineration which successfully removed dioxin of lower concentrations 400 parts per billion at Diamond Alkali s other Superfund site in Times Beach Missouri In a more populated urban area the two year decontamination would cost 40 million Not surprisingly in 1998 the responsible corporation Occidental Chemicals took the third route to encase

    Original URL path: https://dailynewarker.com/tag/passaic-river/ (2016-04-27)
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  • Pollution – The Daily Newarker
    waste into the Passaic River On June 4 1983 after a chilling contamination report Governor Kean showed up in the site with Mayor Ken Gibson to order further inspection and to close the nearby Newark Farmers Market the largest seafood supplier in New Jersey in addition to fresh and frozen goods for the tri state area A few months later the Federal Government declared it among the first Superfund Sites However all politicians reporters and lab workers in white moonwalk outfits soon disappeared leaving scared Ironbound residents puzzled Governor Kean s spokesman Carl Golden explained This is not the kind of thing that leads to a quick overnight solution In past 27 years the 65 000 cubic yards of polluted dirt and debris faced a few remedies none of which led to easy solutions According to the company the only place for processing highly contaminated materials is in Coffeyville Kansas with a price tag of 241 million plus transportation that would take seven to ten years A second solution is on site incineration which successfully removed dioxin of lower concentrations 400 parts per billion at Diamond Alkali s other Superfund site in Times Beach Missouri In a more populated urban area the two year decontamination would cost 40 million Not surprisingly in 1998 the responsible corporation Occidental Chemicals took the third route to encase the four acre site with a floodwall and a groundwater treatment system at a cost of 22 million the lowest cost approach Some additional debris was put in 932 cargo containers piled along the Passaic River For more details about the EPA Lower Passaic River cleanup see www ourpassaic org projectsites The EPA approved interim solution thereafter turned to be permanent while the Dallas based company went into its fast global expansion during the Golden Era of massive deregulation under the Bush Administration The CEO Dr Ray Irani has lived a high life in Beverly Hills with a record annual earning of 460 million in 2006 For a bad year he made 59 million in 2009 Meanwhile Newark has developed Renaissance on a garbage heap as Johns Hopkins University researcher Eileen McGurty has called it The largest garbage incinerator opened in 1991 to process 930 000 tons of garbage annually Alan Gerson a New York City Council member representing Lower Manhattan complained about the incinerator air Some of the stench and toxins could waft right back to Manhattan on an easterly wind In our local Jersey struggling to dispose of municipal solid garbage the state and the county tried to entice Newark to allow more incinerators by throwing in an employment opportunity a jail also in the Ironbound As adjunct law professor of Seton Hall University Tirza Wahrman observed Another thing going on here is New Jerseyans don t feel a sense of ownership about Newark This typical urban American story will not be completed without mentioning its heroes With some other enduring Ironbound residents a young man Arnold Cohen started the Ironbound Committee Against Toxic

    Original URL path: https://dailynewarker.com/tag/pollution/ (2016-04-27)
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  • Zemin Zhang – The Daily Newarker
    removed dioxin of lower concentrations 400 parts per billion at Diamond Alkali s other Superfund site in Times Beach Missouri In a more populated urban area the two year decontamination would cost 40 million Not surprisingly in 1998 the responsible corporation Occidental Chemicals took the third route to encase the four acre site with a floodwall and a groundwater treatment system at a cost of 22 million the lowest cost approach Some additional debris was put in 932 cargo containers piled along the Passaic River For more details about the EPA Lower Passaic River cleanup see www ourpassaic org projectsites The EPA approved interim solution thereafter turned to be permanent while the Dallas based company went into its fast global expansion during the Golden Era of massive deregulation under the Bush Administration The CEO Dr Ray Irani has lived a high life in Beverly Hills with a record annual earning of 460 million in 2006 For a bad year he made 59 million in 2009 Meanwhile Newark has developed Renaissance on a garbage heap as Johns Hopkins University researcher Eileen McGurty has called it The largest garbage incinerator opened in 1991 to process 930 000 tons of garbage annually Alan Gerson a New York City Council member representing Lower Manhattan complained about the incinerator air Some of the stench and toxins could waft right back to Manhattan on an easterly wind In our local Jersey struggling to dispose of municipal solid garbage the state and the county tried to entice Newark to allow more incinerators by throwing in an employment opportunity a jail also in the Ironbound As adjunct law professor of Seton Hall University Tirza Wahrman observed Another thing going on here is New Jerseyans don t feel a sense of ownership about Newark This typical urban American story will not be completed without mentioning its heroes With some other enduring Ironbound residents a young man Arnold Cohen started the Ironbound Committee Against Toxic Waste in 1983 Among many heroic pushing backs the committee sued the State DEP for its negligent inaction in 1984 In the past three decades his daughter has been born and has recently left home to attend Princeton University while his hair turned grey at the age of 62 I hope that my little Newarker daughter will some day join Arnold s daughter to carry the Committee s battle for a just and clean America Author Ken Walker Posted on March 31 2010 Categories Featured Tags Diamond Alkali Passaic River Pollution Zemin Zhang 1 Comment on Another American Experience at 80 Lister Ave Ironbound Newark s Ironbound An American Experience A few years ago when powerful developers and institutions planned to turn my James Street neighborhood into a giant corporate parking lot we started to search over the urban Tri State area for a new refuge Soon we happily concluded that one does not have to go as far as Astoria in Queens for a viable diverse and un gentrified community with a rich history that reflects our American experience individually and collectively It s found in our own Ironbound which was the subject for Monday s panel discussion organized by the Newark History Society In a small area of four square miles surrounded by a curve in the Passaic River and the Northern Corridor rail tracts the Ironbound has been the home for generations of working class Germans Italians Irish Eastern Europeans Jewish and African Americans In the past decades Portuguese dominated the area increasingly joined by Brazilians and other Hispanics However according to one of the panelist Maria Pereira of Luso Americano her nationally circulated newspaper found that 48 percent of Portuguese residents never responded to the 2000 Census Therefore the accurate size of the Ironbound population has always been a subject of speculation Many well known early American immigrant communities have been characterized by their extremely transient living For instance an average early immigrant family made Lower Eastside Manhattan its home for only eight months before its upward migration In contrast the Ironbound has retained many proud long term residents through Newark s ups and downs Another panelist Alice Schreiner a manager of Ironbound Senior Citizen Center was born at 102 Houston Street where her Polish American parents settled 59 years ago not far from their own parents After attending St Casimir Academy and Eastside High School she married and moved from the second floor to the first floor of the same building where she raised her four children Alice plans her next move only when the God calls me One of the organizers of tonight s discussion Nancy Zak once told me about her treasured Sunday morning family tradition having pancakes with her older upstairs neighbor Fighting for a stable American experience has kept her working at the Ironbound Community Corporation which will celebrate in the coming May over 40 years of community service The most endearing presentation was by Walter Chambers and Michael Underwood who grew up respectively in Ironbound s Pennington Court and Hyatt Court Homes two earliest Newark public housing projects While not glossing over their difficult circumstances they both enthusiastically celebrated their rich diverse experience both socially and culturally With an often ill single mother in the 1950 s Underwood enjoyed his freedom as an Ironbound Tom Sawyer As a child he roamed around neighborhood factories foundries and even the police auto pound where he learned from manufacturing workers about the real world Finding his love of railroads at Ironbound s edges he has become a Conrail locomotive engineer and a union leader Chambers a 78 years old African American distributed his brief history of Pennington Court 1939 1960 in which he quoted the 1940 statement by Neil Convery the accomplished Newark architect and first Newark Housing Authority director The housing program is truly American Twenty three nationalities and two races white and black are living in friendly neighborliness in a government aided project However that was long before the Real Estate Lobby as President Truman called it mobilized corporate powers to sabotage public housing and create the most economically and racially segregated housing market in the industrialized world As one of the participants pointed out Ironbound s ethnically diverse history was once well represented by over ten local newspapers of all languages Forward a progressive Yiddish newspaper still has its old building standing on Ferry Street Students of Newark history can also testify about Ironbound s reflection of national and regional politics through a century of turmoil For instance during the World War I Ironbound s Hamburg Place was changed into its current name Wilson Street The area closely witnessed the wartime industrial boom and then the final decline of the country s manufacturing power Since 1947 Newark s port and airport a part of Ironbound have been taken over by the Port Authority to become the world s only comprehensive air rail sea infrastructural complex At the same time nobody seems to remember that Newark is a costal city while it declines into a mismanaged inward city However tonight s discussion was all about celebrating Ironbound s diverse enduring and ever optimistic people Walter Chambers closed the discussion by quoting the late Charles Cummings People will always be the most valuable resource of America The Newark History Society s event in May will be about the Star Ledger s history Author Ken Walker Posted on March 26 2010 Categories Featured Tags History Ironbound Newark History Society Zemin Zhang 2 Comments on Newark s Ironbound An American Experience Paradise Lost Newark Poetry All hell broke loose John Milton Paradise Lost In June 1667 Puritans under Robert Treat signed the first city charter for the religiously exclusive Newark governance A month later these white men struck a good deal with the Lenape Indians for the paradisiacal land from the Passaic River to the Watchung Mountains That was the year when the immortal Milton first published his Paradise Lost In November 1915 Newark at its pinnacle organized the Newark Poetry Competition as a part of the city s 250th anniversary celebration In the official publication The Newarker the organizers wrote Newark is not all industries smoke rush and din It is a great center of production and in its special field of work is alert and progressive But it has also beautiful homes fine parks admirable schools and a useful library Its thousands of shade trees are the envy of many cities The cleanliness of its highways surprises even the Newarker himself It has a good government churches in plenty and many worthy clubs and societies Art and science even are not altogether neglected here Newark with 400 000 people is known to all the world as a producer of honest goods Clement Wood a graduate of Yale Law School won the first prize with his poem The Smithy of God Clang and clang and clang and clang Till a hundred thousand tired feet Drag drag drag down the evening street And gleaming the myriad street lights hang The far night noise dwindle and hush The city quiets its homing rush The stars blow forth with silent sweep As Hammer and hammered drowse asleep Softy I sing to heaven again I am Newark forger of men Forger of men forger of men Perhaps even with a nightingale s singing Wood s nocturne might not be able to send 400 000 working men and women with blue eyes and children with above average intelligence to their sweet American dreams every night However Newark indeed was a first class city of manufacture and technological inventions Poet Sayers Coe a native Newarker and a graduate of Princeton could even verify the most familiar sound of his time in his The Voice of the City Clang Clang Clang Clang Clang Hark to the music that the hammers beat List to the tramp of the marching feet See where the forges redly glow This is the song that my children know Clang Clang Clang Clang Clang Hear me cities of men Before becoming an editor of Puck Magazine Berton Braley labored with his hands passing coal on the Great Lakes digging ditches guarding prisons and an insane asylum farming and mining With Walt Whitman s spirit he testified The needs and wants of the world have spurred her Newark city that builds our dreams However amazed by Newark s vulgar Pollyannaish fever the literature wizard Ezra Pound sent his advice from London If each Italian city is herself Each with a form light character Can you Newark be thus setting a fashion But little known in our land On May 31 1916 40 000 citizens celebrated the city s birth in a beautiful amphitheatre in Weequahic Park On a natural stage separated from the crowds by a lagoon 300 feet long and 163 fee wide 4 000 performers unfolded the city s history in four movements including Lenape peace legend Robert Treat of course land rioters of 1746 and rebels against British tyranny in a 1776 town meeting A live band of 92 pieces performed the pageant music composed by Henry Hadley for the event Was life so great then Would the celebration last Our poet Richard Cammarieri in his 1999 poem Taking Sides asked Celebrate Celebrate what Ignorance deceit Conquest slavery death that is what you are about and I know we know what you are about In the next 50 years through two World Wars the Prohibitionist attack the Great Depression and Urban Renewal two waves of Southern African American migrant workers moved in with poverty and tens of thousands of whites moved out with wealth In front of the eyes of a single generation the once powerful city swiftly experienced a stunning metamorphosis which has in turn generated a very different poetry In 1967 a Newark court convicted Amiri Baraka with his poem We must take our own world man our own world and we cannot do this unless the white man is dead Let s get together and kill him my man Let s make a world we want black children to grow and learn in In his Black People the paradise lost scene was depicted What about that bad short you saw last week on Frelinhuysen or those stoves and refrigerators record players in Sears Bamberger s Klein s Hahnes Chase and smaller joosh enterprises What about the bad jewelry on Washington Street and those couple of shops on Springfield You know how to get it you can get it no money down no money never money don t grow on trees no way only whitey s got it makes it with a machine to control you you cant steal nothing from a white man Now even those stores Sears Macy s Klein s Hahnes and whatever enterprises have long gone and might never come back The paradise has nothing but Baraka s and my anger A young poet Candy Killion cries in her Urban Renewal Newark 2005 They stand at sweet attention now Condos tight and scrubbed Manicured and fertilized On the hot tarred rise where there was never grass Not when we know it Over there see the swing set through decades of exhaust from the 21 bus back further still see the hill then houses burning National Guard boys white and black and yellow and red barely nineteen some of them crawling sweaty and confused in the gutters rifle muzzles erect through tinted windows waving at them into dreams of rice paddies Molotov air broken glass and screams are there still Under the flowerbeds under the new set sod Just as we knew it We knew it Do we know that once lost the paradise will never come back Maybe the crazy Ezra Pound who died in an asylum was right after all Can you Newark be thus setting a fashion But little known in our land We don t really need a paradise do we Author Ken Walker Posted on February 1 2009 Categories Featured History Tags Arts Culture Media Featured History Zemin Zhang Leave a comment on Paradise Lost Newark Poetry Newark s Autopia In a 1957 lecture the city thinker Lewis Munford observed instead of planning motor cars and motor ways to fit our life we are rapidly planning our life to fit the motor car that we have no life that is worth living Arguably Munford has summarized our 100 year collective experience in Newark and far beyond In the afternoon of August 20 1834 Newarkers cheered their first glimpse of rapid transit a team of powerful horses made an epochal trip pulling a car the Washington on tracks from a Broad Street tavern to Jersey City On December 2 1835 the first steam locomotive Newark started to replace horses on the line In the winter of 1871 the locally built Baxter Steam Car operated on the Bloomfield line going 18 miles an hour In 1888 a spectacle of cable cars had a short life on Springfield Avenue Newark s first electrical trolley car began operation on October 4 1890 and swiftly took over the city s streets In 1893 America s first gas engine automobile was built in Springfield Massachusetts On February 21 1908 the first Newark Auto Show opened at Essex Troop Armory on Roseville Avenue featuring moving pictures of the thrilling Vanderbilt Cup race Thousands of visitors admired over 30 brands of magic machines including Maxwell Crawford Jackson Peerless Ford Fiat Oldsmobile and Regal The subsequent shows even gained national significance attended by President Tufts and focused not only on sales but also the politics of auto legislation and road construction Motor cars aggressively but arrogantly charged into Newark s maelstrom of dirty horse wagons trotting carriages famously made locally darting bicycles and hyper streetcars The city builders of the Progressive Era believed that automobiles provided the solution to urban traffic problems Newark s Harland Bartholomew said in 1913 The logical development and growth of a modern city depends almost exclusively upon its transportation facilities Once Newark s streets were cleared of slow vehicles they would be dedicated to the smooth flow of motorized traffic The modern Autopia however quickly turned into a bloody nightmare with hundreds of deaths under wheels annually Local motoring organizations supported by the automobile industry directed public attention to trouble makers jaywalkers They even heavily advertised against popular images of spoiled joy riders and demanded the press to cease attacks on innocent motorists With the auto lobby State Motor Vehicle Commissioner Magee said in a 1939 Newark City Hall meeting Approximately 3 000 pedestrians have been killed and more than 35 000 injured in the last five years Careless action of pedestrians the almost absolute defiance of many stubborn minded individuals of their probable chances for injury is an outstanding reason for these casualties As some people observed even Ralph Nader s auto safety reform in the 1960 s did nothing for those lives outside the car Starting from 1923 Newark adopted strict laws against jaywalkers Through endless efforts of widening streets particularly after Essex County took over major corridors e g Springfield Bloomfield Central Avenues as county roads many sidewalks were further narrowed or even eliminated Many ordinances were adopted against traffic problems such as uniform traffic control 1915 street parking bans 1921 and one way streets 1940 In the 1920 s Police Director Brennan the father of our beloved U S Superior Court Justice was the most hated figure in town for his traffic law enforcement The great German historian Oswald Spengler who chronicled the decline of the West observed as early as 1932 In great cities the motor car has by its numbers destroyed its own value and one gets on quicker on foot Twenty years later however the magic machine reached its new pinnacle in American with an average of three persons owning a car compared with one out of every 20 Britons owning a car Optimistic city planners are divided into two camps like today Some are confident

    Original URL path: https://dailynewarker.com/tag/zemin-zhang/ (2016-04-27)
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  • Newark’s Ironbound: An American Experience – The Daily Newarker
    black are living in friendly neighborliness in a government aided project However that was long before the Real Estate Lobby as President Truman called it mobilized corporate powers to sabotage public housing and create the most economically and racially segregated housing market in the industrialized world As one of the participants pointed out Ironbound s ethnically diverse history was once well represented by over ten local newspapers of all languages Forward a progressive Yiddish newspaper still has its old building standing on Ferry Street Students of Newark history can also testify about Ironbound s reflection of national and regional politics through a century of turmoil For instance during the World War I Ironbound s Hamburg Place was changed into its current name Wilson Street The area closely witnessed the wartime industrial boom and then the final decline of the country s manufacturing power Since 1947 Newark s port and airport a part of Ironbound have been taken over by the Port Authority to become the world s only comprehensive air rail sea infrastructural complex At the same time nobody seems to remember that Newark is a costal city while it declines into a mismanaged inward city However tonight s discussion was all about celebrating Ironbound s diverse enduring and ever optimistic people Walter Chambers closed the discussion by quoting the late Charles Cummings People will always be the most valuable resource of America The Newark History Society s event in May will be about the Star Ledger s history Share this Twitter Facebook Google Like this Like Loading Related Author Ken Walker Husband Father Newarker PCA Elder Business Analyst In a glass case of emotion since 1978 View all posts by Ken Walker Author Ken Walker Posted on March 26 2010 Categories Featured Tags History Ironbound Newark History Society Zemin Zhang 2 thoughts on Newark s Ironbound An American Experience tim sullivan says March 28 2010 at 5 33 pm Very interesting May I quote you on our next BCBC Ironbound bike tour Like Like Reply Pete says March 29 2010 at 1 56 pm Just a quick correction Wilson Avenue was not Homburg Street it was Hamburg Place as in Hamburg a major transportation hub in Northern Germany Like Like Reply Leave a Reply Cancel reply Enter your comment here Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in Email required Address never made public Name required Website You are commenting using your WordPress com account Log Out Change You are commenting using your Twitter account Log Out Change You are commenting using your Facebook account Log Out Change You are commenting using your Google account Log Out Change Cancel Connecting to s Notify me of new comments via email Post navigation Previous Previous post Interview West Ward Councilman Ronald C Rice Next Next post Another American Experience at 80 Lister Ave Ironbound Search for Search Recent Posts Gothamist serves up a guide to Portuguese cuisine in the Ironbound Former Newark mayor Cory Booker publishes his

    Original URL path: https://dailynewarker.com/2010/03/26/201003newarks-ironbound-an-american-experience/ (2016-04-27)
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  • History – The Daily Newarker
    only comprehensive air rail sea infrastructural complex At the same time nobody seems to remember that Newark is a costal city while it declines into a mismanaged inward city However tonight s discussion was all about celebrating Ironbound s diverse enduring and ever optimistic people Walter Chambers closed the discussion by quoting the late Charles Cummings People will always be the most valuable resource of America The Newark History Society s event in May will be about the Star Ledger s history Author Ken Walker Posted on March 26 2010 Categories Featured Tags History Ironbound Newark History Society Zemin Zhang 2 Comments on Newark s Ironbound An American Experience Star Ledger Black History Month Newark Star Ledger Black History Month Newark project honors influential city educator James Baxter Every ethnic group needs such a person Price said noting that other ethnic groups also sought to have their leaders memories immortalized in brick in some fashion It s no coincidence that Newark named its 1955 public housing project placed in the First Ward then the nation s fourth largest Italian American enclave Christopher Columbus Homes Now the tradition of honoring local ethnic groups is frowned upon in some circles Alderman said Some school boards around the nation have even written formal policies discouraging naming a school after a person In many cases he said the powers that be are simply trying to avoid controversy Great long form piece on how Baxter Terrace came to get its name and the history of naming locales as a way to honor great achievements and how that process has evolved With the stereotypes of drugs and crime associated with the housing complex will the planned city park maintain the Baxter name Author Ken Walker Posted on February 5 2010 Categories Uncategorized Tags Analysis Baxter Terrace History Housing Status 2 Comments on Star Ledger Black History Month Newark Weequahic Tour Sunday November 1st Hello I am going to be leading a tour of Weequahic on Sunday November 1st at 2 00 The tour will cover all aspects of Weequahic s history from Indian and colonial days to the agrarian century to the suburb s train associated growth the Jewish generation and finally the neighborhood and park of today The cost is 10 general 5 for members of the Weequahic Park Association or a Newark historical society We will be meeting at the intersection of Lyons and Elizabeth Avenues Please see http www newarkhistory com for more information Check the website on the day of the tour in the event of inclement weather Author Ken Walker Posted on October 20 2009 Categories History Tags Events History Jeff Bennett Leave a comment on Weequahic Tour Sunday November 1st North Ward Walking Tour Tomorrow Hi in case anyone is interested I m leading a walking tour tomorrow on Broadway and Mt Prospect Aves in the North Ward We will be meeting at 230 Broadway at 2 30 PM We ll be seeing lots of things you never noticed before

    Original URL path: https://dailynewarker.com/tag/history/ (2016-04-27)
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  • Ironbound – The Daily Newarker
    her Polish American parents settled 59 years ago not far from their own parents After attending St Casimir Academy and Eastside High School she married and moved from the second floor to the first floor of the same building where she raised her four children Alice plans her next move only when the God calls me One of the organizers of tonight s discussion Nancy Zak once told me about her treasured Sunday morning family tradition having pancakes with her older upstairs neighbor Fighting for a stable American experience has kept her working at the Ironbound Community Corporation which will celebrate in the coming May over 40 years of community service The most endearing presentation was by Walter Chambers and Michael Underwood who grew up respectively in Ironbound s Pennington Court and Hyatt Court Homes two earliest Newark public housing projects While not glossing over their difficult circumstances they both enthusiastically celebrated their rich diverse experience both socially and culturally With an often ill single mother in the 1950 s Underwood enjoyed his freedom as an Ironbound Tom Sawyer As a child he roamed around neighborhood factories foundries and even the police auto pound where he learned from manufacturing workers about the real world Finding his love of railroads at Ironbound s edges he has become a Conrail locomotive engineer and a union leader Chambers a 78 years old African American distributed his brief history of Pennington Court 1939 1960 in which he quoted the 1940 statement by Neil Convery the accomplished Newark architect and first Newark Housing Authority director The housing program is truly American Twenty three nationalities and two races white and black are living in friendly neighborliness in a government aided project However that was long before the Real Estate Lobby as President Truman called it mobilized corporate powers to sabotage public housing and create the most economically and racially segregated housing market in the industrialized world As one of the participants pointed out Ironbound s ethnically diverse history was once well represented by over ten local newspapers of all languages Forward a progressive Yiddish newspaper still has its old building standing on Ferry Street Students of Newark history can also testify about Ironbound s reflection of national and regional politics through a century of turmoil For instance during the World War I Ironbound s Hamburg Place was changed into its current name Wilson Street The area closely witnessed the wartime industrial boom and then the final decline of the country s manufacturing power Since 1947 Newark s port and airport a part of Ironbound have been taken over by the Port Authority to become the world s only comprehensive air rail sea infrastructural complex At the same time nobody seems to remember that Newark is a costal city while it declines into a mismanaged inward city However tonight s discussion was all about celebrating Ironbound s diverse enduring and ever optimistic people Walter Chambers closed the discussion by quoting the late Charles Cummings People will always

    Original URL path: https://dailynewarker.com/tag/ironbound/ (2016-04-27)
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