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  • Speculative Producing - Building Artifacts as Practical Futurism - davidnunez
    was truly science fiction in 2002 as technology presented in the show was not widely available Disturbingly in 2008 just about every innovation mentioned in the program has been demonstrated by governments universities companies or even the diy garage inventor It s easy to see that given a little more tinkering time everything in the piece could arrive in the next few years That got me thinking about what it means to be plunging the fringes as an amateur futurist I have friends who are educated and trained futurists Garry for example They have a toolbox of systems analysis that can find patterns in our world that would indicate trends in the observable future i e they think 10 20 years ahead and not 1000 years In our lifetime When Garry talks about energy I trust him because he spends his days researching and prospecting the domain while applying his pattern matching experience This activity happens all the time in thinktanks They get paid to speculate and present the future so organizations can create strategies that might improve their success whatever that might mean However I also like the idea of domain experts ex architects fashion designers software engineers involving themselves in near future speculation by creating representative artifacts of the future I m interested in what the amateur futurist who is not necessarily involved in thinking about trends directly would create given an appropriate creative prompt For example industrial design firms often go through this exercise What does the vacuum cleaner look like in 2020 Their designs might not actually function but they will build representative mockups and create websites and commercials as if they really did exist Nikhil Mitter describes speculative design as an emerging practice based research methodology that promotes designed objects as tools for critical reflection

    Original URL path: http://www.davidnunez.com/2008/12/15/speculative-producing-building-artifacts-as-practical-futurism/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Large Letters for greater creativity - davidnunez
    s because whenever I watch a brilliant hacker give a technical talk they put their screens up on the projector and live code with super large type Perhaps it reduces the amount of stuff that fits on my screen to a more elegant that which matters Too much text via smaller font makes it difficult to focus It s a cognitive hack for creativity Monoco 18pt Vibrant Ink color scheme

    Original URL path: http://www.davidnunez.com/2008/12/11/large-letters-for-greater-creativity/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Observations at Dev House - davidnunez
    and video streams and guest blogging gigs and Uber secret open source coalition of boards and specification architects is just about to launch and change the universe forever The have to wear costumes COSTUMES to SxSW so they are noticed and photographed since you have never heard of anything they ve actually shipped before You fall for it once or twice or a few years You may even chase the glory Then the veneer fades Then you meet people who are actually smart and are producing projects daily that chip away at real world observable improvements in our human condition Then you get angry or bitter or jealous at the evangelists and connectors You look around and wonder what the hell happened and how did so much time disappear Not at Dev House Everyone was working and the socializing was all in the context of real effort I suspect that there would have been very little tolerance for the BS that we generously call expertise at your typical tech conference panel sessions for example Tolerance overstates the case Valueless people would probably have just gone home on their own because they would have been ignored Coding notes I also got a glimpse of what I m missing as a lone wolf freelancer I ve not really participated much in pair programming sessions and realized that there are some practical advantages For example watching somebody s terminal commands might reveal a new shortcut that can shave precious seconds off of trivial operations With somebody looking over your shoulder and simultaneously working on the same problems you tend to be on better behavior There wasn t time for much architecture or even goal setting at the session We just kind of went forward as fast as we could The day before I

    Original URL path: http://www.davidnunez.com/2008/12/09/observations-at-dev-house/ (2016-04-26)
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  • lifecasting as a digital notebook - davidnunez
    about their experiments as they are learning and trying new ideas and techniques These logs serve as both evidence of work progress and as fodder for the papers that are the mark of accomplishment for scientists While there are many attempts to digitize or automate these notes it seems that most researchers revert to paper and pencil as their note taking default Mac relayed a story of a researcher printing out results and literally cutting and pasting the spreadsheet into a paper notebook Lifecasting as Means for Project Documentation There are live video streams of offices and studios and workshops out there that I find fascinating Sometimes I ll just turn them on one of my monitors and just have them running in the background Since I work alone from my home office this sometimes makes me feel connected to other humans also pursuing some results A little while ago I registered a ustream tv account for an idea called Tinkercam lifecasting as means for project documentation There is a known psychological effect that when you are observed in a work setting i e you think somebody is watching you you will work more effectively and are more likely to stay on task The surprising thing is that this will even work if you place a photograph of eyeballs somewhere in your peripheral vision I set up my tinkercam in hopes that it may be a way to mindhack my way into increased focus On my test run I just found that I was spending all my time fiddling with the webcam and that only one person was watching who thought I was a tech support person and started asking questions about setting up their ustream account Granted I could have gone onto twitter and announced the launch of tinkercam but I felt that it s not at a launch stage yet The cam is live sometimes nonetheless I then started brainstorming on what else a tinkercam would be and how it needs to change to be useful or even fun First because it s video it needs to point at interesting things A guy banging on his keyboard all day is actually not interesting More interesting would be a stream of my computer screen overlaid on top of my face so you could see what I was working on what I was paying attention to and how my workflow progresses If I was working on my robotics projects like the robot puppet then I could get away with just pointing my camera at my soldering iron and that would be more visually interesting by the nature of the work Second it needs to be unobtrusive I shouldn t have to think about turning it on or switching between camera views Something like motion detection or application awareness could act as a virtual director for the tinkercam The more exciting potential is that by recording the stream or taking critical snapshots you can document the progress of a project automatically

    Original URL path: http://www.davidnunez.com/2008/12/06/lifecasting-as-a-digital-notebook/ (2016-04-26)
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  • My grand project - davidnunez
    s a good place When I consciously made the decision not to pursue web stuff as a source of income the universe rewarded me by presenting just enough non web opportunity to keep my income pipeline fuller than it s ever been while keeping the stress level way down I m happier when I m doing work that s more creatively fulfilling I m also realizing that if I keep all of my creative work closed up in a box out of fear or relentless tinkering then it s as good as never done Nothing is more unflattering than trying to convince someone of the value of a perpetual closed beta As a side effect I find that the people I m wanting to meet deal in the currency of provable accomplishments and not vaporware ideas Nobody cares about the network of people I know since nowadays it s super easy to reach anybody via social media tools Spinning multiple plates badly is not attractive They aren t even interested in what I can do The only thing that matters is What have you done lately that s remarkable Cal Newport defines Grand Projects as any project that when explained to someone for the first time is likely to elicit a response of wow Cal Newport There is a huge difference in multitasking because you are disorganized and consciously multitasking so that you accomplish interesting grand projects Interesting people are often involved in multiple grand projects but they really only can get one completed at a time So the better question is What project are you working on right now that fires you up the most I d like to live a life of prolific creativity I d like to introduce myself with infectious enthusiasm over some project I can

    Original URL path: http://www.davidnunez.com/2008/12/05/my-grand-project/ (2016-04-26)
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  • What we can learn about multitasking from machines - davidnunez
    that required multiple steps or tasks the fastest way to complete that single problem is to begin at the beginning and work through until it s completed i e not to get sidetracked doing anything off of the critical path So let s look at an example Suppose a computer has a problem that requires 10 small math operations to complete and lets say that the computer can only process 10 math operations a second This means the computer will accomplish this problem in 1 second It follows that if a CPU can work only one small step at a time then if it has 2 complicated projects to complete each with 10 small steps it takes 20 steps or 2 seconds to complete The diagram below shows the computer only working on one complicated project at a time It completes the first project and then starts the second project This is called sequential processing If computers actually worked that way we would be so frustrated that we would bang our heads on our keyboards and probably spend more time outside Right now your computer is doing easily a few million extremely complicated processes ex the video rendering that causes these words to show up at the right place on your screen If you had to wait for the first million projects to complete before the computer started the next million it would take minutes for your mouse to move a couple pixels in any direction So we need something like this Notice how we haven t saved any time at all However the perception is that lots of things are finishing at around the same time That s all computer multitasking is about it s just getting things finished at a time which seems acceptable to the end user For complex problems which require many steps the computer maintains a set of holders in its memory called registers At any given time as the computer is working through a multi step problem it can take the state of everything it is working on in its CPU and put all the values into some of the registers It can also load up a different collection of values from another group of registers and pick up where it left off This is basically how the CPU can keep track of many complicated problems in various states of completion This process is called context switching and happens every so often i e millions of times per second We can amend our previous example by adding context switching tasks The worst case scenario has you switching projects after every task Let s simplify and say that a context switch takes the same amount of time as any other small task Whoa We almost doubled the amount of time required to complete just two projects by adding context switching In fact we get exponential increases of time for every new project we add a multitasked project just because of the overhead of having to

    Original URL path: http://www.davidnunez.com/2008/11/04/what-we-can-learn-about-multitasking-from-machines/ (2016-04-26)
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  • April 2016 - davidnunez
    what are we making https twitter com MidComm status 722606998227914752 photo 1 2016 04 18 1849 Microblog from twitter RT genspacenyc Midnight Commercial is looking for a biologist to help with a tardigrade project Inquire if interested http midnightcommercial com s Biologist pdf MidComm 2016 04 14 0918 Microblog from twitter I work at a place where we have open job calls for a glass artist biologist and software engineers

    Original URL path: http://www.davidnunez.com/2016/04/ (2016-04-26)
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  • March 2016 - davidnunez
    industrial UX engineers software full stack JS creative coder interns http midnightcommercial com MidComm 2016 03 15 1814 Microblog from twitter house resolution declaring magic a national treasure http www politico com story 2016 03 pete sessions magic 220778 cc virtualmagician 2016 03 07 1229 Microblog from twitter hey AppleSupport I can t seem to get help via your site https twitter com davidnunez status 706887866039848960 photo 1 2016 03

    Original URL path: http://www.davidnunez.com/2016/03/ (2016-04-26)
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