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  • Designing for Kindle Fire and iPad? What you need to know now.
    multiple login or market penetration increases sufficiently to allow multiple large tablets within the same household the larger iPad sized tablets are going to continue to be biased toward anonymous family based media consumption One of the quick wins I recommend in my book is having individual apps handle multiple logins or profiles until the login is fixed this is a must interim design hack for the privacy problem Although the jury is still out this privacy dynamic could be very different for mini tablets Lower price point could engender the public to purchase truly personal mini tablets thus removing the privacy issue Mini tablets especially in an attractive durable drop resistant cases can also be stowed away in purses and backpacks more easily and taken along on more outings than their heavier more expensive and fragile iPad sized counterparts Essentially smaller tablets can be thought of as individual mobile devices with use patterns similar to those of mobile phones Of course on the flip side few consumers can currently justify purchasing a second mobile phone and that appears to be the Achilles Heel of the mini tablets the public s perception that they are too close to smartphones yet not as capable without the 3G wireless plans to justify purchasing the second device From the standpoint of the interface design it s a mistake to think of larger iPad sized tablets and their mini counterparts the same way The ergonomics of each device are fairly different Most mini tablets as are most smartphones can usually be held in one hand while multi tasking or literally on the move while holding on to the overhead bar in the Metro car One handed mini tablet operation is possible because the device is lightweight and a typical adult can reach most of the controls on the screen with their right thumb while holding the device in the same hand It makes sense then for designers to optimize the touch controls accordingly for a one handed operation Even in most games milti touch interface controls on the mini tablet are also somewhat limited to a smaller sub set of touch gestures such as a simple swipe that can be comfortably executed on a small screen Instead accelerometer driven controls such as shaking tilting and rotating the entire device are called upon to shoulder some of the interaction complexity The situation could not be more different for larger iPad sized tablets Larger heavier devices dictate that they be at a minimum held in two hands or rested on some surface or the lap of their owner In addition the extra two inches of the screen make it impossible to reach all of the controls with one hand while also holding the device with the same hand Thus it makes sense to place touch controls for larger tablets vertically along each side of the device while generally avoiding the bottom of the screen because the bottom of the screen is awkward to reach while the

    Original URL path: http://www.designcaffeine.com/articles/designing-for-kindle-fire-and-ipad-here-is-what-you-need-to-know-now/ (2016-04-27)
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  • Design Patterns for Mobile Faceted Search: Part II
    The search results are on the left in this wireframe filters on the right Following a basic convention of mobile user interfaces buttons on the right let people drill down deeper into the application s information architecture IA space while tapping buttons on the left moves them closer to the top of the IA or to the home page In this example of what Microsoft calls panoramic applications the mobile device acts as a sort of viewfinder that displays only a small part of a much larger virtual space The Teaser design pattern very effectively facilitates discovery through its use of partially exposed screen elements in my example faceted search results filters This pattern also enables people to make rapid transitions from looking at search results to narrowing down the search results so it is highly suitable for applications in which it is advantageous for people to discover a set of filters quickly and use them often Basic Advanced Parallel Architecture Pattern Another good design pattern for efficient discovery and use of filters is the Basic Advanced Parallel Architecture design pattern depicted in Figure 4 This design pattern is especially effective in applications that offer a fixed set of filters for instance booking air travel Figure 4 Basic Advanced Parallel Architecture design pattern The idea behind the Basic Advanced Parallel Architecture design pattern is that there are two modes of interacting with filters basic and advanced The basic mode lets customers easily engage with your application and dramatically shortens their learning curve However people who want an advanced mode of filtering can easily obtain this functionality in the example shown in Figure 4 by returning to the filter page and tapping the Advanced Search tab The parallel architecture part of this pattern comes in when a customer needs to adjust the filter values For customers who started their query from the Basic Search tab tapping Back returns them to that tab For customers who started from the Advanced Search tab tapping Back returns them to that tab where they can adjust the expanded set of filters While the relationships between these three contexts Basic Search Advanced Search and Search Results are a bit difficult to explain they offer a very natural interaction model that most people have found very intuitive to use during testing The Basic Advanced Parallel Architecture design pattern offers the added advantage of a flatter architecture Instead of an advanced mode that requires people to go deeper into an application s IA the advanced flow sits in parallel with the basic flow so both are equally accessible with a single tap It is important to note that in both cases the search results page has a persistent status bar across the top of the screen displaying an entire search query plus any applied filters Recall that a persistent status bar was one of the features I described in Part I of Design Patterns for Mobile Faceted Search One application that successfully implements the Basic Advanced Parallel Architecture

    Original URL path: http://www.designcaffeine.com/articles/design-patterns-for-mobile-faceted-search-part-ii/ (2016-04-27)
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  • Design Patterns for Mobile Faceted Search: Part I
    The four design patterns that follow make the most of the available screen real estate while providing intuitive and useful search results refinement capabilities and improving the mobile faceted search experience Four Corners and Modal Overlay Patterns As I described in my column Search Results Satori Balancing Pogosticking and Page Relevance maximizing the number of results on a search results screen is key to improving information scent and overall finding efficiency One of the most successful design patterns for maximizing the use of screen real estate is the Four Corners pattern shown in Figure 4 Figure 4 Four Corners and Modal Overlay patterns The Four Corners pattern devotes almost the entire mobile screen to search results Users can display particular functions by tapping the semitransparent corners which provide access to filters the home page and two additional menus This pattern includes a thin persistent status bar across the top of the screen which displays an entire search query plus any applied filters rather than just the few characters Amazon Mobile displays in a large font Displaying an entire query is highly beneficial given users mobile context of use and the frequent interruptions inherent in the mobile finding experience Although the design pattern is called Four Corners and triangles are the most effective shape for the corners they don t necessarily have to be triangles Other alternatives include semitransparent buttons or floating icons However for transparent buttons it s best to keep icons simple and avoid text labels Another pattern that works really well with Four Corners is the Modal Overlay pattern shown on the right in Figure 4 A modal overlay can display various search refinement options such as filtering and sorting As I wrote in The Mystery of Filtering by Sorting it is not necessary to place filtering and sorting in two different areas of a screen Most people have at best just a vague idea of the differences between the two features This is particularly true for the mobile experience where screen real estate is at a premium and minimizing the number of taps necessary to achieving a goal is key The Four Corners and Modal Overlay patterns work particularly well in combination In Figure 4 each user interaction on the modal overlay refines the search results interactively This dynamic interaction model works great because users can always see where they are and what filters they have applied and they have easy access to further refinement options all without ever leaving the context of the search results screen Some touch phones like the iPhone do not provide an API Application Programming Interface for modal overlays but instead deliver content one screen at a time with transitions between screens On such devices you ll need to fake modal overlays You can achieve this effect by rendering the same search results on a new screen this time with a slightly darkened background with a modal overlay over the results When displaying this new screen an application should minimize any transition

    Original URL path: http://www.designcaffeine.com/articles/design-patterns-for-mobile-faceted-search-part-i/ (2016-04-27)
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  • faceted search
    Strategy Mobile and Search Featured UX Design Articles Mobile and Tablet UX Design Articles Search UX Design Articles Tagged With faceted search iPhone Mobile and Tablet UX Design Articles Search UX Design Articles tablet UX Design UXmatters Best Practices for Designing Faceted Search Filters Jan 19th 2010 by Greg Nudelman Office Depot multiple select attribute based faceted search redesign misses some key points making their new search user interface less

    Original URL path: http://www.designcaffeine.com/tag/faceted-search/ (2016-04-27)
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  • Designing Mobile Search: Turning Limitations into Opportunities
    s better to start from scratch focusing on What experience would work best for mobile users Putting users goals first allows a design team to concentrate on the new opportunities a mobile application presents rather than seeing the challenges of mobile simply as barriers to implementing a Web application s existing functionality Next I ll present some ideas about how to approach the design of finding experiences for mobile devices in a way that lends itself to taking full advantage of their capabilities within a mobile context of use These ideas by no means represent an exhaustive catalog of all possibilities I merely want to provide a few examples that may inspire further exploration as part of your own finding projects Preloading Pertinent Search Results As I discussed earlier typing on mobile devices is difficult Plus a phone call a text message or an opportunity to take a picture is likely to interrupt a user s finding experience at least once Saving a user s previous searches is an obvious and simple way of re engaging users in a finding task and provides useful context when an application first opens Unlike Web applications native mobile applications are persistent so it s easy to cache their search results Cached results load quickly users re engagement is immediate and there is little to compete for a user s attention that is at least until another phone call comes in Some mobile device APIs even enable native applications to detect whether a phone call interrupted a user s previous session or the user exited an application normally and determine how much time has elapsed since a user last opened the application These capabilities present interesting possibilities for fine tuning an application s welcome back screen to re immerse users in their previous tasks or offer pertinent new content and present new possibilities for interaction Providing Local Results On mobile devices that support GPS Wi Fi or other location tracking mechanisms you can determine the current location of another person who is using a mobile device allowing applications to offer location aware services Mobile applications with search capabilities can serve highly relevant fresh results that perfectly match a user s current mobile context For example Loopt is just one of a whole cadre of social networking mobile applications that allow users to track the locations of their friends who are currently nearby and exchange messages with them get coupons from local merchants and discover neighborhood happenings as Figure 3 shows Figure 3 Local search results in the Loopt iPhone app Offering a Value Added Interpretation of the Real World Using mobile devices for sense making in the real world offers one of the most intriguing possibilities for mobile applications Luke Wroblewski described some interesting possibilities including augmented reality applications in his Smashing Magazine article Enhancing User Interaction with First Person User Interface When it comes to finding however the Amazon Mobile iPhone app offers the Amazon Remembers feature which is a forerunner of many

    Original URL path: http://www.designcaffeine.com/articles/designing-mobile-search-turning-limitations-into-opportunities/ (2016-04-27)
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  • Numeric Filters: Issues and Best Practices
    they are intuitive and easy to use and UX powerhouses like Amazon and Netflix do quite well without any sliders whatsoever That said sliders can be helpful in some applications because they give people tremendous filtering power when they are implemented correctly With great power however comes great responsibility Sliders deserve special consideration from designers precisely because they make it so easy for your customers to screw up and overconstrain their queries leading to search results that are either incorrect or of poor quality This in turn results in frustrated customers who leave your Web site quickly without buying anything The two issues I see most often with sliders are inadvertently emphasizing overconstrained filter states being parsimonious with inventory information Let s take a closer look at each of these issues and what we can do about them Issue Inadvertently Emphasizing Overconstrained Filter States To examine the issue of overconstrained filter states let s take a look at an example the slider rating control on TripAdvisor shown in Figure 3 Ratings seem deceptively simple yet raise a host of usability issues when they are implemented incorrectly Figure 3 Slider rating control on TripAdvisor TripAdvisor has implemented ratings using a double slider control which presents a perfect example of inadvertently emphasizing overconstrained filter states This double slider control allows a wide variety of ranges some of which are much more useful than others when it comes to finding particular items or content of interest For example rating ranges spanning only a single star such as 0 1 stars 1 2 stars or 2 3 stars are simply not useful because short ranges do not match the mental model of the people using the system Most of the time people click a rating filter to get all of the merchandise above a certain rating that is as a way to find higher quality items in their search results However a double slider control overemphasizes the ability to constrain the range from both sides making it very easy to get this wrong by overconstraining a query A much more useful way of approaching this design problem is to use a single slider or a set of links like those shown in Figure 4 which shows ratings as they are currently implemented on Amazon Figure 4 Amazon s more useful implementation of ratings as links We could further improve the rating control shown in Figure 4 Since the goal of people using this control is to get better quality items it is not actually that useful to show only a single star the lowest possible rating Instead it might be more intuitive to replace the single star with the word Any and make that the default filter state The filter shown in Figure 4 also has the important added advantage of providing vital inventory information Item counts following each set of stars help people using the ratings filter to clearly understand the consequences of their actions and builds appropriate expectations Understanding what to expect

    Original URL path: http://www.designcaffeine.com/articles/numeric-filters-issues-and-best-practices/ (2016-04-27)
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  • Search UX Design Articles
    Articles Tagged With ads eye tracking peel corner Search UX Design Articles UX Design UXmatters Make More Money Best Practices for Ads in Search Results Part 1 Jan 19th 2010 by Greg Nudelman Conflicting demands make many UX professionals think of ads as a necessary evil Customers frequently go out of their way to say they hate ads while marketers always seem to try their hardest to stuff as many of them as they can on each search results page on your site In this column I ve teamed up with advertisement and eyetracking research guru Frank Guo to present real world strategies for successfully integrating ads into your search results Filed Under 56 Articles on Digital Strategy Mobile and Search Search UX Design Articles Tagged With ads eye tracking revenue Search UX Design Articles UX Design UXmatters Best Practices for Designing Faceted Search Filters Jan 19th 2010 by Greg Nudelman Office Depot multiple select attribute based faceted search redesign misses some key points making their new search user interface less usable and therefore less effective This makes it an excellent case study for demonstrating best practices for designing filters for faceted search results Filed Under 56 Articles on Digital Strategy Mobile and Search Featured UX Design Articles Search UX Design Articles Tagged With drill down faceted search multiple select parallel selection Search UX Design Articles UX Design UXmatters Brave New World of Visual Browsing Jan 19th 2010 by Greg Nudelman Today everywhere we look it seems like image content is taking over the Web The ubiquitous use of digital cameras and improvements in the picture quality of mobile phone cameras has likely helped this phenomenon along The shift toward content that is primarily visual introduces new challenges and opportunities for developing intuitive and powerful user interfaces for browsing searching and filtering visual content Filed Under 56 Articles on Digital Strategy Mobile and Search Mobile and Tablet UX Design Articles Search UX Design Articles Tagged With Flickr Google Images Mobile and Tablet UX Design Articles Photosynth QR code Search UX Design Articles UX Design UXmatters The Mystery of Filtering by Sorting Jan 19th 2010 by Greg Nudelman For most users of consumer facing ecommerce applications the difference between a sort and a filter presents a mystery they understand dimly if at all The distinction between sorting and filtering blurs because of a phenomenon I ve called filtering by sorting which leads to all sorts of interesting search user interface implications Filed Under 56 Articles on Digital Strategy Mobile and Search Search UX Design Articles Tagged With combo controls filter mental models price fitler Search UX Design Articles sort sort tabs top 50 UX Design UXmatters Search Results Satori Balancing Pogosticking and Page Relevance Jan 19th 2010 by Greg Nudelman When designing the data and layout for search results pages the challenge is finding the right balance between providing enough information in individual search results so customers can make informed decisions without pogosticking and providing enough relevant search results on each

    Original URL path: http://www.designcaffeine.com/category/articles/search/page/2/ (2016-04-27)
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  • Speaking
    practical workshop explores what can be learned from the valuable lessons of mobile ecommerce search and how to profitably apply these learnings to the design of enterprise mobile search products Filed Under Speaking Tagged With Mobile and Tablet UX Design Articles Presentation UX Design Workshop The Silicon Valley iOS Developers Meetup January 19 2011 LinkedIn Headquarters Mountain View CA Jan 20th 2011 by Greg Nudelman Designing a Resourceful Mobile Search Experience Greg was very knowledgeable and had numerous examples to demonstrate his concepts Definitely worth my time Very interesting and insightful talk We need more Greg s in the world Thanks Greg for a top notch presentation on mobile UX Filed Under Speaking Tagged With Mobile and Tablet UX Design Articles Presentation UX Design Workshop Design4Mobile September 20 24 2010 Chicago IL Sep 22nd 2010 by Greg Nudelman Designing Resourceful Mobile E Commerce Search Mobile search presents a compelling story in its own right with it s own experience considerations and tremendous opportunities To help illustrate what creates a resourceful and intuitive mobile search experience I will present the best material from my upcoming book Designing Search UX Strategies for eCommerce Success due out from Wiley in Spring 2011 Filed Under Speaking Tagged With Mobile and Tablet UX Design Articles Presentation Search UX Design Articles UX Design Workshop DrawCamp June 12 2010 Milwaukee WI Jun 10th 2010 by Greg Nudelman Storyboarding iPad Transitions In this session we will dig deep together into the frame by frame analysis of popular iPad interface transitions and discuss the animation principles behind the secrets of industrial design magic that makes iPad transitions such a compelling experience Then I will demonstrate how to easily draw both existing transitions and any new design ideas in a fun storyboard format using post it notes Filed Under Speaking

    Original URL path: http://www.designcaffeine.com/category/speaking/page/2/ (2016-04-27)
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