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  • Dr. George Forman

    (No additional info available in detailed archive for this subpage)
    Original URL path: /movies/forman.html (2016-04-26)



  • Dr. Kathryn Hirsh-Pasek

    (No additional info available in detailed archive for this subpage)
    Original URL path: /movies/hirsh.html (2016-04-26)


  • Dr. Deborah Linebarger

    (No additional info available in detailed archive for this subpage)
    Original URL path: /movies/linebarger.html (2016-04-26)


  • Parent Info
    the world around him as well as reading books and talking about what you see will more effectively lay the foundation for language development lead from the sidelines As tempting as it might be to offer a baby more and more stimuli as they play and make sure that they do everything there is to do and see everything there is to see understand that it is frequently better to simply sit back and observe your baby s behaviors Let the baby go for it Celebrate curiosity and perseverance Be careful not to re direct your baby s focus when she is engaged in an activity however Calling attention to the color of a nesting box for example when the child is attempting to make it fit into another one most likely will be a distraction Look for natural places to introduce a related idea When the moment seems right introduce a new material or action into the baby s play pattern In this case you might slide a bigger box closer to your baby to extend the routine of putting things in Stick with the baby s program Remember if you re always out in front chances are that you ll block the baby s view and try some of these techniques Mirroring Demonstrate that you are paying attention by imitating your baby s actions By doing what she is doing you are connecting to her play in a simple but fundamental way For example roll balls across the floor together or help her fill a container with blocks Describe both what both you and she are doing Focusing Point out important aspects of a problem or encourage her to stick with the task in the face of frustration You can do this by calling attention to different approaches that work and those that don t For example if your child is trying to stack nesting cubes but is having difficulty encourage your child by reminding her that the biggest cube goes on the bottom Focus your child s attention on the problem balance in this case and talk about it You might explain how the tower is tippy and that the big cube on the bottom helps it balance and keep from falling Scaffolding Reduce the number of steps or make it easier to achieve her goal Sometimes your child may become stuck in trying to make something happen and needs to have the situation simplified in order to take her play or learning to the next level For example if your child is doing a puzzle and having difficulty finding where the pieces go or how they fit you might help her by gently showing her where the piece goes or by showing her how to turn and twist the piece to manipulate it to fit in the correct space Over time as both memory and motor skills develop the scaffolding will no longer be necessary and you won t have to help her place the pieces

    Original URL path: http://www.eebee.com/parent_info/eebee_athome_playpartner.html (2016-04-26)
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  • parent info — at home ideas
    for many young children the wrapping paper and the box is often more intriguing than the gift inside Notice paper in your daily environment commenting on its color texture and feel Make balls from old newspaper for tossing and rolling Create your own ball games Tear paper using a wide range of papers including toilet paper cardboard writing paper tissue paper Notice the differences Work with your baby to sort the torn pieces in piles by size color texture material Remember it s not a test it s play Stuff torn paper into tubes and cylinders Where did it go Put different paper treasures perhaps pictures or drawings in a variety of boxes Play a game of finding each treasure Mix up the boxes and look again Make a cape or a hat out of a large piece of newspaper or butcher block paper Save appliance and moving boxes for climbing in and on A collection of these could result in a box city Add scarves as doorways or curtains Provide three or four small paper gift boxes of different size shape or color Try to match the lids with the boxes Collect shoe boxes for building and stacking Use

    Original URL path: http://www.eebee.com/parent_info/eebee_athome_paperadventures.html (2016-04-26)
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  • Parent Info
    accordingly Describe the action Take your time with this sort of exploration and start gently Transferring Set out two or more big bowls or pans and fill one with sand oats or rice Give your baby a plastic measuring cup or scoop or a plastic spoon Make a game out of transferring the materials from one container to the other Let your child experiment with various of these transferring tools to determine which one she seems to prefer Don t worry if she misses the container or even dumps it all out All of this exploration requires fine motor work adjustments and practice as well as quantitative thinking As you play these fill it up games use quantity words such as more another scoop or a lot and a little Sprinkling and Listening Active listening is a great activity for infants One of the nice things about these fine materials is that your child can explore making sounds lots of sounds without a lot of volume These sounds tend to be soothing and engaging Set out some tin foil or muffin pans and experiment with sprinkling and listening to the sound of the rice or sand or oats To keep things tidy place the foil pan inside a larger plastic tub Lift your hand high when you sprinkle to see if it varies the sound Use the word listen and model listening closely to help the baby focus For a variation switch to a metal pot or large plastic bowl and sprinkle the materials into these different containers Talk about what you hear Your baby may just be fascinated by your sprinkling sounds or she may grab a handful Either is great just be sure to listen actively to any sounds she makes as well Model your behavior to encourage your baby doing this along with you Filling and Emptying Babies and toddlers are fascinated with changing the amount of something in a space They like to empty things and fill them up Set out a series of small cups filled with one of the materials and a larger clear bowl or container Model pouring one of the cups into the larger container With older babies you might start by helping your child to fill the cups first Then set up a factory where one at a time you hand a cup over to your child to empty into the larger container Continue until all of the cups are emptied and then start all over again Help with the refilling but let you child participate and help with filling too even if her efforts are not the most efficient Comment on how you see the larger container filling up Reverse the action by letting the baby scoop the material out of the larger container into another one and start over again Use quantity words to describe what you see Stirring Scooping Digging Fill a deeper container such as a roasting pan a pot or large plastic bowl with rice oats

    Original URL path: http://www.eebee.com/parent_info/eebee_athome_pouring.html (2016-04-26)
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  • Parent Info — at home ideas
    water bottles toy vehicles empty toilet paper rolls Use a piece of cardboard a cutting board or other flat wide surface as a ramp Hand each rolling item to your baby to roll down the ramp You may have to model how it s done first Comment on the different items as they travel down and off the ramp Repeat the ones that appear to intrigue your child the most Talk about the object s motion and speed Baby bowling Place light weight objects such as toilet tissue tubes at the bottom of the ramp Model bowling for your child Describe the action You might also simply position your hill or ramp so that the sliding object hits a wall or something that makes noise Slide Up At the park in a play room or with an improvised slide roll or slide items such as balls or blocks up the surface Talk about its movement Point out how quickly it moves back down the surface If a slider gets stuck help your child to get it moving again This kind of backwards way of doing things helps babies to look at familiar things in different ways and sets the stage for reversing an action or working backwards an important problem solving skill Big Rollers Use large beach balls or exercise balls if you have them to present bigger physical challenges as well as full body ways of experiencing the concept of round Make sure that the surrounding surface is soft carpeting mats etc Hold the baby around her waist and place her tummy down on the ball Rock and roll her gently Older babies and toddlers may want to master this move by themselves Stay close hold onto them gently and spot their attempts Conquering big things is very compelling

    Original URL path: http://www.eebee.com/parent_info/eebee_athome_rolling.html (2016-04-26)
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  • parent info — at home ideas
    with an infant Sit with the baby and model stacking the blocks Choose blocks a small enough size that your baby can grasp a hold of softer blocks are also easier for young infants to get a good grip on Sponges can be used as a soft block variation Square sponges can be stacked and rearranged Be sure to choose good sturdy solid sponges that will hold together as the baby handles and mouths them Kitchen blocks Plastic storage containers are another practical building toy Give your baby a set of containers that fit inside of one another perfect for building a stacking tower With the lids your baby can easily stack one on top of the other Without the lids your child can also explore making the containers fit inside one another Comment on your child s activity Use comparison words such as bigger and smaller as well as prepositions such as on under in Small boxes Use old cardboard gift boxes or jewelry boxes for block play Try putting some weight in a few to provide variations in weight You can fill a few with baby safe items like rice or sand just tape them securely closed to prevent spilling Providing blocks of different sizes and weights will challenge your baby both physically and cognitively Medium Boxes Tissue boxes shoe boxes cereal boxes and other medium size boxes also work well for both stacking and pushing Tape the lids on to create solid blocks The variation of box size and shape make for interesting construction options Aim for more solid and heavier boxes Big Boxes For gross motor work set out some big soft blocks throw pillows can work too for the baby to play with Young babies enjoy realizing they can push these big objects across the

    Original URL path: http://www.eebee.com/parent_info/eebee_athome_building.html (2016-04-26)
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