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  • Musi | Ethnologue
    language Classification Austronesian Malayo Polynesian Malayo Chamic Malayic Malay Dialects Belide Burai Coastal Malay Kelingi Lematang Ilir Meranjat Musi Sekayu Palembang Lama Pegagan Penesak Penukal Rawas A mutually intelligible dialect chain stretching along the Musi River with 2 subgroups Musi and Palembang A member of macrolanguage Malay msa Language Use Home village market religion All ages Positive attitudes Also use English eng Indonesian ind Used as L2 by Central Malay pse Col liw Javanese jav Komering kge Language Development Not currently a written language Preference is for Indonesian for educational and religious materials Preference is for L1 for cultural stories and songs Mixed preference for health and agricultural materials Radio programs TV Dictionary Grammar Language Resources OLAC resources in and about Musi Other Comments Muslim Musi Place in Language Cloud Click to enlarge with explanation Ethnologue Products Languages of Indonesia An Ethnologue Country Report 324 pp 24 95 Add to cart Language Map of Indonesia Sulawesi An Ethnologue Language Map 24 95 Add to cart Browse all products Join the conversation Create a free account to post Feedback about a country or language and be notified when others do the same Browse by Countries Language Names Language Codes Language Families

    Original URL path: http://www.ethnologue.com/language/mui (2016-02-13)
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  • Persian | Ethnologue
    products Join the conversation Create a free account to post Feedback about a country or language and be notified when others do the same Browse by Countries Language Names Language Codes Language Families Map Titles Products Current Edition About Ethnologue Abbreviations Bibliography Credits Downloads FAQ Other Products Ethnoblog Language of the Day Print Edition 17th Edition 16th Edition 15th Edition 14th Edition 13th Edition Related Sites SIL org ScriptSource ISO

    Original URL path: http://www.ethnologue.com/language/fas (2016-02-13)
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  • Dari | Ethnologue
    Persian Dialects Darwazi Tangshew Tangshuri Radio Afghanistan broadcasts promote a standardized pronunciation of the literary language based on the old dictional tradition of the country with archaic phonetic characteristics Phonological and lexical differences between Iran and Afghanistan cause little difficulty in comprehension Most Afghan dialects are reportedly more similar to literary Persian than Iranian dialects are Lexical similarity 86 90 among Dari dialects A member of macrolanguage Persian fas Language Use All domains All ages Positive attitudes Language Development Literacy rate in L1 28 Taught in primary and secondary schools Poetry Magazines Newspapers New media Radio programs Films TV Videos Dictionary Grammar Bible 2008 Language Resources OLAC resources in and about Dari Writing Arabic script Arab Other Comments Muslim Sunni Muslim Shi a Dari Also spoken in Expand All Collapse All Pakistan Language name Dari Population 1 000 000 in Pakistan 2 000 3 000 in Madaglasht Chitral and many Afghan refugees 1992 SIL Location North West Frontier Province Southeast Chitral Shishi Koh Valley Madaglasht village Peshawar Rawalpindi Lahore Karachi and other large cities Alternate Names Afghan Persian Badakhshi Madaglashti Tajik Status 5 Dispersed Language Use Used as L2 by Hazaragi haz Writing Arabic script Arab Other Comments Madaglasht community in Chitral came from Badakhshan Afghanistan 200 years ago Other communities in Pakistan are primarily refugees or settlers from Afghanistan Muslim View other languages of Pakistan Place in Language Cloud Click to enlarge with explanation Ethnologue Products Languages of Afghanistan An Ethnologue Country Report 42 pp 9 95 Add to cart Language Map of Afghanistan An Ethnologue Language Map 24 95 Add to cart Browse all products Amazon Recommendations Join the conversation Create a free account to post Feedback about a country or language and be notified when others do the same Browse by Countries Language Names Language Codes Language

    Original URL path: http://www.ethnologue.com/language/prs (2016-02-13)
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  • Persian, Iranian | Ethnologue
    All domains All ages Also use English eng Northern Luri lrc South Azerbaijani azb Southern Luri luz Language Development Taught in primary and secondary schools Fully developed Bible 1838 1995 Language Resources OLAC resources in and about Persian Iranian Writing Arabic script Arab Other Comments Muslim Shi a Baha i Christian Persian Iranian Also spoken in Expand All Collapse All Iraq Language name Persian Iranian Population 227 000 in Iraq 1993 Location Near Iran border Al Basrah Diyala Maysan and Wasit governorates Alternate Names Persian Status 5 Dispersed Writing Arabic script Arab Other Comments Muslim View other languages of Iraq Oman Language name Persian Iranian Population 25 000 in Oman 1993 Location Masqat governorate Muttrah and Ruwi areas near Muscat city possibly in other coastal cities Alternate Names Persian Status 5 Dispersed Language Use Many women speak only Farsi Men who go outside the community speak Arabic as L2 and many know 2 or 3 other languages Writing Arabic script Arab Other Comments Muslim Shi a View other languages of Oman Qatar Language name Persian Iranian Population 170 000 in Qatar 2014 Laval University Alternate Names Persian Status 5 Dispersed Writing Arabic script Arab Other Comments Muslim View other languages of Qatar Tajikistan Language name Persian Iranian Population 50 000 in Tajikistan Johnstone and Mandryk 2001 Location Southwest Tajikistan Khatlon province various economic development sites also in Dushanbe Alternate Names Persian Status 5 Dispersed Writing Arabic script Arab Other Comments Not a literary language in Tajikistan Muslim Shi a View other languages of Tajikistan United Arab Emirates Language name Persian Iranian Population 346 000 in United Arab Emirates 2014 Alternate Names Persian Status 5 Dispersed Writing Arabic script Arab Other Comments Muslim View other languages of United Arab Emirates Place in Language Cloud Click to enlarge with explanation Ethnologue Products

    Original URL path: http://www.ethnologue.com/language/pes (2016-02-13)
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  • Search | Ethnologue
    Abbreviations Bibliography Credits Downloads FAQ Other Products Ethnoblog Language of the Day Print Edition 17th Edition 16th Edition 15th Edition 14th Edition 13th Edition Related Sites SIL org ScriptSource ISO 639 3 Contact SIL International Publications 7500 West Camp Wisdom Road Dallas TX 75236 5629 USA publications intl sil org T 972 708 7404 F 972 708 7363 Contact us SIL org This web edition of the Ethnologue may be

    Original URL path: http://www.ethnologue.com/search (2016-02-13)
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  • Ethnologue launches subscription service | Ethnologue
    are taking We have been working very actively with those who inquire about institutional and group e g classroom subscriptions to provide the greatest amount of access as possible at a more than reasonable cost We love the idea of open access and SIL has been at the forefront in making our resources available as widely and as freely as possible We were actively involved in establishing the Open Language Archives Community OLAC and we have encouraged community participation in the Ethnologue itself through the addition of the Feedback feature on every language and country page Providing sustainable access to the Ethnologue and its information is our goal We think that asking the most frequent users in high income countries to pay very minimal fees for that access is the most equitable way to achieve that sustainability Submitted by M Paul Lewis on Wed 2015 12 16 08 58 Maybe make it more obvious from individual pages I was already down to 1 view left before I even noticed the change and even then I only noticed it because it was more obvious when viewed in mobile mode on my desktop I probably would not have noticed until it at all until I ran out of views and it asked me for money Since I subscribe to the feedback lists I had been clicking on language data related to some of those comments I d received through those lists but probably would not have clicked on them at all if I d realized that I was using up my free monthly pages by doing so I was just clicking on them out of a slight interest to see for myself what they were commenting on but I might have saved my free pages for my own research if I d realized I was using them up I ll know from now on but there are also many sites that directly link to various pages on Ethnologue It would be nice if the counter at the bottom was a bit more obvious or there was a clear notification at the top of the pages and maybe also a notice sent to the feedback lists or did I miss that somehow so that other users who get there that way are more aware of this change It would be different if it were a brand new site but people are very used to this site being free and the counter in the bottom corner blends in with the other logos etc portions of the site that rarely change so I didn t read them closely Submitted by Jennifer Runner on Thu 2015 12 17 11 21 RE Maybe make it more obvious Hi Jennifer Sorry this snuck up on you like this It has been a major change for all of us and we are all adjusting to the new wrinkles that the subscription process has introduced One important point that your comment brings up Not every page on the website is metered and that may be part of the reason that you didn t immediately notice the page counter When it appears it is pretty obvious bright blue with white text against the white background of the data page And it is deliberately in the lower right oops I mean LEFT corner of the screen so as not to obscure any of the data that you want to look at So for example the home page and the various navigation pages that you need to click on in order to get to a specific country or language are not counted so the remaining free page counter doesn t appear You wouldn t have seen it until you actually accessed a data page In addition while the language and country data pages are counted the Feedback pages aren t So the remaining free page count appears on the language data pages but then disappears when you go to the Feedback tab Keep in mind that you can go back to any data page you have already accessed during the month without using up a free page access So if you want to check if a comment you posted for example has been responded to you should be able to get there without using any additional pages from your monthly allotment And then just to repeat once more most users of the Ethnologue are not likely to encounter the access limitation at all Only users in high income countries are seeing the page counter to begin with and most users of the Ethnologue tend to focus on a single language and so generally don t access more than 7 different pages each month though they may access those few pages multiple times Hope this helps Submitted by M Paul Lewis on Thu 2015 12 17 11 51 and one more thing You mentioned the feedback lists The way it works is that whenever a registered Ethnologue user different from a subscriber decides to follow a specific language country or region they receive a notification when another user posts feedback regarding that language or country or any language or country in a region There is no list as such So short of posting a comment on the Feedback tab for every data entity in the Ethnologue there is no way for us to contact every user directly as you suggest Submitted by M Paul Lewis on Thu 2015 12 17 15 24 Navigation After I log on my only option appears to be clicking on The Languages of the World Neither the pre highlighted VIEW or the icon with 4 horizontal lines stacked vertically trigger any response from the site The latter used to open Browse By for me but no longer What am I missing Thanks John Submitted by John Van Der Decker on Fri 2015 12 18 20 40 Re Navigation John My apologies for not seeing this and responding to you more quickly I ve forwarded your question on to our

    Original URL path: http://www.ethnologue.com/comment/2126 (2016-02-13)
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  • Nailing Jello to the wall: Language Identification | Ethnologue
    This has happened to me more than once on travels within the United States Mutual intelligibility is indeed one way to determine where one language stops and another one starts But in my experience I believe that the other person did understand me when I spoke I just could not understand him when he replied Intelligibility is not necessarily a two way street There are a number of factors that contribute to or inhibit intelligibility So then what if neither person understands the other Again we run into problems when we re speaking two different dialects from the extreme ends of a dialect chain I speak Dialect A and can readily understand Dialects B C and D However Dialect E is like a foreign language to me but not to its nearest neighbors So then where do we cut the dialects into two or more languages If for example we decide to make the cut between Dialect D and E people from those two dialects can easily understand each other and they won t accept that they are speaking two different languages A language is distinguished not only by intelligibility but also by ethnic cultural and or political identity In some cases one ethnic identity can include speakers of several languages or even people who no longer speak a particular language For example someone who self identifies as an Albanian may be a speaker of one of four distinct Albanian languages These four languages are for the most part not mutually intelligible And an Albanian might also be one of those ethnic Albanians who has given up their mother tongue and now speaks another language altogether On the other hand there are many languages that are mutually intelligible but nevertheless are considered to be separate One example would be Hindi

    Original URL path: http://www.ethnologue.com/ethnoblog/chuck-fennig/nailing-jello-wall-language-identification (2016-02-13)
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  • Migration and Language Contact | Ethnologue
    immigrant languages within a country s borders becomes more important and useful With populations on the move in such large numbers and in so many different directions as they now are we face significant challenges to our ability to accurately provide the relevant data We are redoubling our efforts to get more up to date data but the statistics like the people themselves are on the move Log in or register to post comments Comments Migration Of Mayan Peoples to the United States Dear Paul I am new to this part of Ethnologue I am writing to you with great urgency Though I have looked at various languages over time I am now in need of some guidance for a practical reason I am trying to distinguish the areas where Mam is spoken in Western Guatemala in order to assist legal assistance efforts for immigrants fleeing these states San Marcos Huehuetenango and Quetzaltenango If there is a better way to direct this message to persons associated with that language or Mayan Languages in Guatemala please instruct me I have found ISO 639 3 page where Mam as the language of my inquiry is listed but a few aspects are puzzling towns are mentioned as areas for speakers but I would like to confirm that what is actually meant is municipio Towns can mean a lot of things especially in Latin america so that nomenclature is not very clear for me at least The second question is if there is more data on the towns that make up the five dialects designated A list for each dialect would be very helpful There is one comparison for mutual intelligibility between two of the five dialects on the site Is there any newer information for other sources to look at I have read the Atlas Linguistica de Guatemala Richards 2003 which lists areas at more and at less risk in terms of municipalities but that does not give me the larger picture of how many speak which dialect Also in an older version of Ethnologue there were estimates for numbers of speakers for several Mam dialects and I do not see that there now if it is was changed is it possible to contact those who changed it and ask if they have updated information or was it considered inaccurate I am trying to create a guide to distinguish the major Mam dialects so that better matches between interpreters and legal service providers can be created and then used This is a quite urgent matter given there are over 20 000 indigenous language speaking immigrants detained in the US immigration system in one year by my estimates see Exclusion of Indigenous Language Speaking Immigrants in the US Immigration system a technical review http www amaconsultants org uploads 5638303bb62f9 pdf I appreciate your consideration of my questions Blake Gentry Submitted by Blake Gentry on Fri 2016 01 15 00 17 Mam in Guatemala Hi Blake It probably would be more efficient for us to

    Original URL path: http://www.ethnologue.com/comment/2311 (2016-02-13)
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