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  • How NOT to use the Ethnologue | Ethnologue
    point in time some of our data will be out of date When we were on a four year publication cycle a new edition coming out in print and online every four years a great deal of what we reported was in need of correction and updating by the end of the review period More recently we have opted to update the online edition annually followed by print snapshots of that data but in doing so we have had to focus primarily on one third of the world s languages each year In addition we have added the online feedback feature so that users of the Ethnologue who wish to suggest corrections and updates can do so more easily While the Ethnologue may be the best information that is available it always lags behind the reality in spite of our best efforts with a limited staff to keep up Second since its inception the focus of the Ethnologue has been on smaller less well known languages sometimes called vernaculars local languages or minority languages Initally only languages that might fall into that category were included in the Ethnologue It wasn t until the 8th edition 1971 that the decision was made to expand the scope of the Ethnologue to include all of the known living and recently extinct languages At that point Barbara Grimes the editor at the time contacted scholars and other sources to include information about the world s major languages While we continue to track major languages and are making efforts to make our reporting on all languages complete concise and consistent we recognize that the world s major languages have been and continue to be much more thoroughly studied and described in academia whereas the lesser known languages continue to be under documented One of the strengths of the Ethnologue is its focused attention on those lesser known languages less emphasis is given to keeping up with published studies about major languages Finally the Ethnologue relies on a large social network of correspondents who voluntarily review our data periodically and submit updates and corrections Many of those correspondents are experts on particular languages or language families All of them have other responsibilities and give freely of their time to assist us as they can While we encourage them to provide us with thorough and comprehensive reviews of the languages they know about frequently all they can do is point out glaring errors or significant changes that they are aware of We are a long way from being able to stay on top of all of the dynamics of border realignments migration population changes alterations in language use and transmission patterns and changes in language and education policy There are many omissions which legal cases like those reported above motivate us to repair and some reported facts go unchanged for multiple editions So how NOT to use the Ethnologue While we have a lot of confidence in what we report as being true at the time the

    Original URL path: http://www.ethnologue.com/ethnoblog/m-paul-lewis/how-not-use-ethnologue (2016-02-13)
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  • Vladimir Putin, Language Ideology, and Tracking Multilingualism | Ethnologue
    a very fragmented place What the article also brings to mind is that Putin s perspective is a monolingual one whereas most of the world s lesser known language communities are multilingual While those of us who are users of the largest more dominant languages feel little pressure to acquire second languages members of the less dominant communities find it advantageous indeed a necessity to have multiple linguistic tools at their disposal The Ethnologue began as a research project before this awareness of widespread multilingualism had come to the fore We generally have attempted to identify a population of first language users for each language we list but those numbers may fall far short of the actual number of people who use the language as their second or third or fourth language in their daily lives Recently we restructured the database so as to allow us to better track L2 sociolinguistic shorthand for second or other language use Acquiring that data is a new priority in our research plan and we expect you will gradually see us able to offer more detailed information about other languages in use by each speaker community We welcome any contributions from you our Gentle Readers in bringing those numbers up to date and we encourage you to use the language feedback mechanism become a Registered Ethnologue User in order to do that Log in or register to post comments Comments Russian nation Putin seems to forget that he is the president of Russia not of the Russians His job is to look out for the interests of all people who live within his borders not all people everywhere who happen to share a single L1 If I were a member of a minority group within Russia I d find his attitude quite offensive as

    Original URL path: http://www.ethnologue.com/ethnoblog/m-paul-lewis/vladimir-putin-language-ideology-and-tracking-multilingualism (2016-02-13)
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  • Sustainable Language Use | Ethnologue
    of language transmission but of knowledge transmission Speakers of non dominant languages need to find ways to preserve the transmission of their life crucial knowledge and the choices they make in that regard have important implications for language use This proposal that the most important concern for speakers of non dominant languages is the sustainable transmission of life crucial knowledge represents the fundamental shift in perspective offered by the Sustainable Use Model The choices of language s and media for that knowledge transmission are ancillary to the decisions a community makes in regard to what bodies of knowledge it will preserve acquire and pass on to future generations The SUM proposes a process which includes 1 the development of specific goals for the ongoing transmission of life crucial knowledge in the languages used by an identified speech community 2 an assessment of the current vitality status of the language s in the linguistic repertoire of the community using the EGIDS 3 the identification of a desired sustainable level of use for those languages and 4 detailed planning to address the conditions which impede the realization of the community s knowledge language planning goals For this last point we have developed a set of five conditions using the acronym FAMED Functions Acquisition Motivation Environment and Differentiation The evaluation of those conditions enables language development activists to specifically target the conditions that are insufficient to support sustainable language use The SUM has been designed to be implemented as a community based participatory process which gives community members primary agency in decision making and program implementation You won t see much mention of these components of the Sustainable Use Model in the Ethnologue other than the EGIDS but as the model begins to be applied we hope to see its impact on the

    Original URL path: http://www.ethnologue.com/ethnoblog/m-paul-lewis/sustainable-language-use (2016-02-13)
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  • Evaluating Endangerment and Development | Ethnologue
    of those levels have been necessary And that expansion has made it possible for us to use the scale not only to evaluate the degree to which a language is endangered but also the level of development that has been achieved as standardization and modernization language planning activities have been implemented in an increasing number of languages Again you can read about the nature of the scale itself how we evaluated the languages reported on in the Ethnologue in terms of the scale and a great deal more by going to the Language Status page and following the links for greater and greater detail We recognize that the EGIDS numbers both the scale itself and the evaluations of the languages using the scale are a new wrinkle There are bound to be some cases where we have just plain gotten it wrong There will be other cases where the situation is unclear And there will be additional cases where the reality on the ground will cause us to re examine the scale itself undoubtedly leading to some modifications as we learn from this first ever application on the global dataset We welcome your comments and corrections and we are committed to working with communities scholars and other interested parties to both describe the scale itself as best we can so it can be applied consistently and to make the needed corrections and updates so that it can be useful to those making decisions about language preservation and development efforts Look at the Contact Us page to see how to submit feedback on the content of the Ethnologue We also are excited about the potential of this global analysis and are looking for good clear and compelling ways to represent the data Our first attempt at this consists of those little scatter plot diagrams which show up most obviously in the Language of the Day presentations You can also find the scatter plots on the homepage and by clicking through to a specific language entry and following the More Information link The plot shows the language in focus as a colored dot positioned on a cloud of gray dots which represent all of the other languages of the world The two scales of the plot represent the EGIDS level of the language on the horizontal axis and the population of the language community on the vertical scale The overall spread of the cloud of dots shows the general correlation between population size and language development rather obviously languages with more speakers tend to be more developed The position of the colored dot on the scatter diagram gives a visual sense of the relative strength or weakness of the language in focus with respect to all of the other languages of the world One striking feature of the scatter plot is the clear concentration of languages at the EGIDS 6a level In addition from the country page click through from World Languages either on the map or on the region and country

    Original URL path: http://www.ethnologue.com/ethnoblog/paul-lewis/evaluating-endangerment-and-development (2016-02-13)
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  • Books, Reports, Maps! | Ethnologue
    the Ethnologue data publicly available and have broken up the big book into three separate volumes The major change however is that each of the three volumes is entirely self contained Rather than segment the data categories language and country data statistics maps indices into separate volumes we have created volumes that deal with large geographic areas the so called Ethnologue regions Africa Americas Asia Europe Pacific combining those so that each volume accounts for approximately one third of the languages of the world This strategy produces books that are much more manageable in size and which can be purchased individually to meet the needs of the user The books are in press as I write and should be available for purchase very soon Even with this strategy there are some users who can be better served by something less than a volume about the languages of Africa and Europe or the Americas and the Pacific or Asia They may be only interested in a particular country For those users Ethnologue country reports are now available and can be directly purchased and downloaded from the website Each country report is also completely self contained and has some additional material that isn t available on the website Both the regional volumes and the country reports also include all of the maps that are relevant to the contents of the product And then Ethnologue s award winning maps are also often asked for and can now be downloaded from the website Some of those are freely available under our terms of use and higher resolution maps can be purchased We continue to work on developing other useful derivatives from the Ethnologue database and we ll let you know more about those as they become available Log in or register to post comments

    Original URL path: http://www.ethnologue.com/ethnoblog/m-paul-lewis/books-reports-maps (2016-02-13)
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  • Join the Conversation! | Ethnologue
    perspectives as you share them The information you provide is handled carefully and you can select how much you want to be made available to the community of registered users Once you have registered and completed your profile we encourage you to subscribe to the regions countries or languages that most interest you By subscribing you sign up for a notification service which will alert whenever anyone posts some feedback about one of your subscriptions So broadly interested in all of the languages of Africa or one of the sub regions within Africa You can subscribe to the entire Ethnologue area and you ll get an email any time someone provides feedback about a language or country within the continent If you agree or disagree with the feedback you can respond and your comment will be added to the thread and other subscribers will in turn be notified The editorial staff also gets notified and where your feedback requires further investigation or motivates a change in the Ethnologue database we will respond Eventually we expect that there will be multiple communities of users collectively sharing their knowledge with each other and with us If you spot an error of fact or even something like a typo or have updated information about a given language this is the best way for you to get it to us Your contributions will be acknowledged and acted upon Already we have received comments that alerted us to an error in the way the website was operating and we were able to correct that quickly Another user has questioned some of the data about a particular language and we have contacted our field correspondents to try to get corroboration While we don t wish to discourage anyone from participating in the discussions it is most helpful to us if along with your suggested updates or corrections you can provide us also with published or expert witness sources that back up your assertions Users who provide us with accurate feedback that results in a change in what we report will be acknowledged in all relevant publications of the Ethnologue That s one reason why we want you to fill out the full user profile before contributing feedback In addition to being able to comment on the data that we report you can also comment on the contents of the Ethnoblog Though mostly the Ethnoblog has talked about the Ethnologue itself we re happy to respond to your feedback directly or to dedicate a future blog post to a topic that you might want to know more about or to answer a question that you might have So the Ethnoblog is another opportunity to engage in conversation about language related topics of interest So please join the conversation Log in or register to post comments Comments Hi Paul Hi Paul I ve been hoping to connect with you for a while I d really love to chat regarding the Ethnoblog and what your needs are I have

    Original URL path: http://www.ethnologue.com/ethnoblog/m-paul-lewis/join-conversation (2016-02-13)
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  • Check out the new Ethnologue! | Ethnologue
    a self contained package for a very reasonable price The award winning Ethnologue language maps can also be purchased and downloaded directly from the website And finally for the first time we are pleased that we can make available the Ethnologue Global Dataset as a licensed product The dataset is a subset of the Ethnologue database comprised of the actionable data fields That is fields that are not simply strings of text but which contain normalized data or Booleans are included in the dataset This allows researchers to do their own analysis of the data by incorporating the Global Dataset tables into their own databases The full documentation for the dataset and information about how to purchase a license to use the Ethnologue Global Dataset can be found by going to the Ethnologue Products page and following the links from there We are excited to see these new features coming online and we hope they will make the Ethnologue a much more useful tool for researchers educators linguists and many others One other new feature that bears special mention is that you can also now comment on these blog posts We look forward to hearing from you Log in or register to post comments Comments Password creation does not work Using the one time login link sends you to a page that insists on your typing in your existing password which you have not yet obtained so it s useless So you have to generate another one time login link every time you want to log in again The whole point of password setting recovery is that you don t need to know your existing password to use it Submitted by John Cowan on Thu 2014 05 01 19 03 Checking on this Sorry you ve had a problem with this I ve passed your comment on to our webmaster and we ll work on getting this fixed I do appreciate your intention to comment though and hope we can make that work for you as soon as possible Submitted by M Paul Lewis on Fri 2014 05 02 12 58 Registration steps John I haven t been able to replicate the problem you describe When you get the email confirmation with the one time link clicking on that link will take you to a page that has a button that says Login Clicking on that button takes you to a form where you can create your profile Included in that profile set up is a place where you create your password and confirm that password You don t need a password to get to that profile set up page if you use the one time link I ll ask our webmaster to delete your existing account that was created when you first tried to register so that you can register again I m sorry for the problem and hope that you ll be successful in registering now Please let us know if you continue to have problems Submitted by

    Original URL path: http://www.ethnologue.com/ethnoblog/mpl/check-out-new-ethnologue (2016-02-13)
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  • In Memoriam: Barbara F. Grimes (1930-2014) | Ethnologue
    those topics and many more My favorite recollection of Barbara was observing her when meeting people at conferences or other gatherings She would often ask where they were from When they told her the name of their home country she would immediately tell them how many languages were spoken there and then ask which of those they spoke When they told her the name of their language she could tell them relevant facts about their language entirely from memory and her in depth familiarity with the Ethnologue content Often she would engage them in a discussion about how similar or different the language was from other related varieties and she never failed to take note of updated and improved information in order to get it into the Ethnologue I have often wanted to be like Barbara in that regard and occasionally when I do remember some little tidbit about a language I say to myself with a bit of pride I m turning into Barbara Grimes Further evidence of her virtuosity as editor is that she has been replaced not by a single person but by a staff of three Each of the current editors has taken on part of the job that Barbara carried out almost singlehandedly Admittedly the project has grown and the technologies we use though helpful require a broad range of expertise but I often marvel at the capacity and tenacity of one woman to keep it all organized and moving in the right direction for four decades A memorial service was held in Tahlequah Oklahoma on March 13th and a group of us including all of the living past and present Ethnologue editors were able to attend pictured from left to right Lewis Simons Gordon Fennig around the photo of Barbara We were privileged to

    Original URL path: http://www.ethnologue.com/ethnoblog/mpl/memoriam-barbara-f-grimes-1930-2014 (2016-02-13)
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