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  • MCC - Everything2.com
    Midwestern Collegiate Conference It is sometimes referred to as MCC The creators of the very evil Comet Cursor combination web browser plug in and trojan horse decided to adopt the acronym MCC for their also very evil My Comet Cursor service And of course and most importantly there was a very very early distribution of linux which was called MCC Its name came from the Manchester Computing Centre It was supposedly very complete and pretty much everyone who used it was supposedly very happy with it None of this however has anything to do with the reason that mcc is my username A personality is an aggregate or an organization like a cricket club I can accept the dissolution of the MCC Bertrand Russell I like it Everything couples Ex couples Comet Cursor Keyboards with a big L shaped enter covering the place Pipe usually is Motor control center unibrow Bertrand Russell Sony Handycam Metropolitan Community Church MrC The UNIX Philosophy Mission Control Marylebone Cricket Club The Simpsons making fun of Fox Usage of the Sony Playstation 2 controller as a back massage device A year and a day Meeting Wuukiee Until today it really pissed me off that I d become this totally centered Zen Master and nobody had noticed Mennonite Cheek to Cheek with Chaps in Chaps a Folsom Street Fair nodermeetlet Antarctic T3 Syndrome Buying a cell phone LiveJournal based websites rushes Log in or register to write something here or to contact authors Sign in Login Password remember me Lost password Sign up Need help accounthelp everything2 com Recommended Reading About Everything2 User Picks 2016 New Hampshire Democratic Primary Thomas Atkins transfinite induction September 11 2002 Not All Who Are Lost Wandered Super bowl babies Editor Picks Altering truth for the sake of convenience Gloria Anzaldúa

    Original URL path: http://everything2.com/title/mcc (2016-02-12)
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  • Accipiter - Everything2.com
    to me and I wish to subscribe to your newsletter XP Balance Sheet Screen scraper The Whiz Bang Atlanta E2 Party Why masturbating with Icy Hot is a bad idea The Everything People Registry United States Georgia How to make a decent cup of tea San Dimas High School Football Rules We re Only In It For The Money Todai Girls who tell you they have a boyfriend Dream Log December 11 2000 There s a woman inside my stereo Gyrfalcon June 13 2004 clientdev Homenode List Generator Birds of Prey August 24 2001 November 30 2000 Evariste Galois XP will not pay the rent Halle Berry Log in or register to write something here or to contact authors Sign in Login Password remember me Lost password Sign up Need help accounthelp everything2 com Recommended Reading About Everything2 User Picks 2016 New Hampshire Democratic Primary Thomas Atkins transfinite induction September 11 2002 Not All Who Are Lost Wandered Super bowl babies Editor Picks Altering truth for the sake of convenience Gloria Anzaldúa Memorial Quest Making Herbal preparations Infused oils Scrabble The Alice in Wonderland Project Math is hard New Writeups Eternal September idea by Tem42 2016 New Hampshire Democratic Primary

    Original URL path: http://everything2.com/title/Accipiter (2016-02-12)
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  • Everything Style Guide - Everything2.com
    s should suffice If you re here you have access to the web The web is a convenient tool for the kind of shallow quickie research that I m describing We re not demanding a doctoral dissertation If you re writing about a person I expect to find out when s he lived and where what s he did that s so special and why I should care It s similar for things Leave me thinking that I know something interesting about it and with some idea of what the big deal is That s not a lot to ask it should take you twenty minutes or half an hour If you re not doing an informative writeup you should still refrain from presenting works of the imagination as fact Wanting something to be true doesn t count not even if you want it really really really bad That even applies to politics believe it or not Don t hardlink parts of things Don t give me this The Call of the Wild crap If you re discussing something provide a link to it not just to some of the preposition s used in its name Most of us have seen all the more common preposition s before and the thrill is gone Do hardlink anything relevant that is or ought to be noded If it s a track listing hardlink each track If it s a discography bibliography or filmography hardlink each title If it s not noded now it probably will be someday When that happens you don t want your writeup to be missing a link to something important E2 is a work in progress and it will remain so Don t pretend that it s finished Take future additions into account Gibberish is boring If you think you re being poetic or creative you re probably writing gibberish If you re outraged by this suggestion then you are almost certainly writing gibberish Gibberish is that which sounds cool and means nothing with the added caveat that it doesn t sound anywhere near as cool as you think it does Trust me on that one When people read it it looks different to them than it does to you If you know you re writing gibberish and you think that s okay you re wrong We don t have much patience with any of that nonsense about how everything is subjective We can tell good writing from crap I don t care if you think you can prove by logic that dog food is cheese I still won t be putting dog food on my pizza This is called common sense You are boring and your problems are boring Yes and I m boring too Before you reveal your innermost soul in a writeup stop and visualize yourself listening to a nice old lady telling you about her hip problems and her gall bladder operation Focus on how exciting that would be Then ask yourself why your

    Original URL path: http://everything2.com/title/Everything+Style+Guide (2016-02-12)
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  • Wharfinger - Everything2.com
    You Were Here Ailie The new experimental New York City subway cars E2 is unfriendly to old noders Prepare me a ship of which the half rotten timbers shall be painted black let the sails be in rags and the sailors infirm and sickly H P Lovecraft The Crying of Lot 49 Long Strange Trip Fading footprints on the boards lead down the quay an empty chair remains American History If you meet the Buddha on the road ask him how far it is to the next gas station Then kill him Some things Sensei has tried to teach me The Hypostasis of the Archons The Gone Growing in Number Pilgarlic Log in or register to write something here or to contact authors Sign in Login Password remember me Lost password Sign up Need help accounthelp everything2 com Recommended Reading About Everything2 User Picks 2016 New Hampshire Democratic Primary Thomas Atkins transfinite induction September 11 2002 Not All Who Are Lost Wandered Super bowl babies Editor Picks Altering truth for the sake of convenience Gloria Anzaldúa Memorial Quest Making Herbal preparations Infused oils Scrabble The Alice in Wonderland Project Math is hard New Writeups Eternal September idea by Tem42 2016

    Original URL path: http://everything2.com/title/Wharfinger (2016-02-12)
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  • E2 Bugs - Everything2.com
    any other noder in a month does not appear to function The code in question is located in writeupsMonthMost and simply returns 0 It was likely disabled after the switch to InnoDB as aggregate statements like the GROUP BY that was inevitably used are far more expensive with row level locks This should be a monthly cron job or implemented equivalently in a nodelet which queries all writeups published in a month grouped by publisher id finds if there s a clear winner SELECT COUNT node id num published ORDER BY num published LIMIT 2 if the two num published don t match there s a winner or do something more complex to award to all people who tie for most that month and awards the achievement appropriately This is a good candidate to use the slave MySQL DB since stale data is unlikely to have an effect 2011 Nov 28 Users IWhoSawTheFace and Tem42 both reported difficulty viewing their own homenodes This is most likely due to timeouts being exacerbated by the presently overtaxed servers Diagnosis is difficult since neither user has provided further details in an E2 Bugs entry If you have a problem like this please report it here and provide time you were accessing your homenode including timezone and browser s you were using In general a large number of slow pageloads right now are for user homenodes whether accessed by the user erself or by others Most likely accessing it by erself tips things over the edge because the counting of messages to oneself is fairly expensive Profiling homenode display would be wise The issue may simply be that there are many htmlcodes used only in homenode display so a bunch of code has to be loaded from disk and homenodes are relatively rarely displayed so we might want to trim them down 2011 Nov 28 Now that htmlcodes are being cached the voting footers maybe still in voteit accumulate text from each previous run This causes a confusing display esp on E2 Bugs because the unvoteable text repeats a dozen times by the final writeup in the node Fixed 2011 Nov 28 Using the ABC button to strike out text in the WYSIWIG editor causes the text to appear struck out in the editor but only in the editor If you click on the HTML button it shows no tag has been added and submitting effectively erases the formatting 2011 Nov 29 The indent button also appears to do nothing reflecting only upon first application but not actually changing any HTML It should create a blockquote I like it thing by Excalibur Tue Jan 24 2012 at 2 33 29 This is such a small thing that it seems churlish to complain and I don t even remember if browsers provide an interface to scroll textareas But it s bothered me for nearly a decade now If they do it would be very nice if upon updating a draft the textarea in which the

    Original URL path: http://everything2.com/title/E2+Bugs (2016-02-12)
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  • jaybonci - Everything2.com
    of gods Content Editors edev My Endorsements categories maintained jaybonci s test category most recent writeup root log December 2014 Send private message to jaybonci Sorry guys I have a second love now Don t worry I m still here It ll be 12 years in March and honestly I owe these walls a great debt It s something I will repay jaybonci everything2 com if you need to write me Please nothing about individual writeups I try very hard not to get caught up in specific pieces of content User Bookmarks Sort by name Sort by date Daylog Sign in Login Password remember me Lost password Sign up Need help accounthelp everything2 com Recommended Reading About Everything2 User Picks 2016 New Hampshire Democratic Primary Thomas Atkins transfinite induction September 11 2002 Not All Who Are Lost Wandered Super bowl babies Editor Picks Altering truth for the sake of convenience Gloria Anzaldúa Memorial Quest Making Herbal preparations Infused oils Scrabble The Alice in Wonderland Project Math is hard New Writeups Eternal September idea by Tem42 2016 New Hampshire Democratic Primary event by Glowing Fish Super bowl babies thing by TheAnglican Not All Who Are Lost Wandered poetry by joie Bernard

    Original URL path: http://everything2.com/title/JayBonci (2016-02-12)
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  • Online Community Dynamics - Everything2.com
    software are closer in spirit to economists and political scientists than they are to people making compilers They both look like programming but when you re dealing with groups of people as one of your run time phenomena that is an incredibly different practice In the political realm we would call these kinds of crises a constitutional crisis It s what happens when the tension between the individual and the group and the rights and responsibilities of individuals and groups gets so serious that something has to be done And the worst crisis is the first crisis because it s not just We need to have some rules It s also We need to have some rules for making some rules And this is what we see over and over again in large and long lived social software systems Constitutions are a necessary component of large long lived heterogenous groups Geoff Cohen has a great observation about this He said The likelihood that any unmoderated group will eventually get into a flame war about whether or not to have a moderator approaches one as time increases As a group commits to its existence as a group and begins to think that the group is good or important the chance that they will begin to call for additional structure in order to defend themselves from themselves gets very very high Part Two Why now If these things I m saying have happened so often before have been happening and been documented and we ve got psychological literature that predates the Internet what s going on now that makes this important I can t tell you precisely why but observationally there is a revolution in social software going on The number of people writing tools to support or enhance group collaboration or communication is astonishing The web turned us all into size queens for six or eight years there It was loosely coupled it was stateless it scaled like crazy and everything became about How big can you get How many users does Yahoo have How many customers does Amazon have How many readers does MSNBC have And the answer could be Really a lot But it could only be really a lot if you didn t require MSNBC to be answering those readers and you didn t require those readers to be talking to one another The downside of going for size and scale above all else is that the dense interconnected pattern that drives group conversation and collaboration isn t supportable at any large scale Less is different small groups of people can engage in kinds of interaction that large groups can t And so we blew past that interesting scale of small groups Larger than a dozen smaller than a few hundred where people can actually have these conversational forms that can t be supported when you re talking about tens of thousands or millions of users at least in a single group We ve had things like mailing lists and BBSes for a long time and more recently we ve had IM we ve had these various patterns And now all of a sudden these things are popping up We ve gotten weblogs and wikis and I think even more importantly we re getting platform stuff We re getting RSS We re getting shared Flash objects We re getting ways to quickly build on top of some infrastructure we can take for granted that lets us try new things very rapidly I was talking to Stewart Butterfield about the chat application they re trying here I said Hey how s that going He said Well we only had the idea for it two weeks ago So this is the launch When you can go from Hey I ve got an idea to Let s launch this in front of a few hundred serious geeks and see how it works that suggests that there s a platform there that is letting people do some really interesting things really quickly It s not that you couldn t have built a similar application a couple of years ago but the cost would have been much higher And when you lower costs interesting new kinds of things happen So the first answer to Why Now is simply Because it s time I can t tell you why it took as long for weblogs to happen as it did except to say it had absolutely nothing to do with technology We had every bit of technology we needed to do weblogs the day Mosaic launched the first forms capable browser Every single piece of it was right there Instead we got Geocities Why did we get Geocities and not weblogs We didn t know what we were doing One was a bad idea the other turns out to be a really good idea It took a long time to figure out that people talking to one another instead of simply uploading badly scanned photos of their cats would be a useful pattern We got the weblog pattern in around 96 with Drudge We got weblog platforms starting in 98 The thing really was taking off in 2000 By last year everyone realized Omigod this thing is going mainstream and it s going to change everything The vertigo moment for me was when Phil Gyford launched the Pepys weblog Samuel Pepys diaries of the 1660 s turned into a weblog form with a new post every day from Pepys diary What that said to me was Phil was asserting and I now believe that weblogs will be around for at least 10 years because that s how long Pepys kept a diary And that was this moment of projecting into the future This is now infrastructure we can take for granted Why was there an eight year gap between a forms capable browser and the Pepys diaries I don t know It just takes a while for people to get used to these ideas So first of all this is a revolution in part because it is a revolution We ve internalized the ideas and people are now working with them Second the things that people are now building are web native When you got social software on the web in the mid Nineties a lot of it was This is the Giant Lotus Dreadnought now with New Lightweight Web Interface It never felt like the web It felt like this hulking thing with a little you know Here s some icons Don t look behind the curtain A weblog is web native It s the web all the way in A wiki is a web native way of hosting collaboration It s lightweight it s loosely coupled it s easy to extend it s easy to break down And it s not just the surface like oh you can just do things in a form It assumes http is transport It assumes markup in the coding RSS is a web native way of doing syndication So we re taking all of these tools and we re extending them in a way that lets us build new things really quickly Third in David Weinberger s felicitous phrase we can now start to have a Small Pieces Loosely Joined pattern It s really worthwhile to look into what Joi Ito is doing with the Emergent Democracy movement even if you re not interested in the themes of emerging democracy This started because a conversation was going on and Ito said I am frustrated I m sitting here in Japan and I know all of these people are having these conversations in real time with one another I want to have a group conversation too I ll start a conference call But since conference calls are so lousy on their own I m going to bring up a chat window at the same time And then in the first meeting I think it was Pete Kaminski said Well I ve also opened up a wiki and here s the URL And he posted it in the chat window And people can start annotating things People can start adding bookmarks here are the lists So suddenly you ve got this meeting which is going on in three separate modes at the same time two in real time and one annotated So you can have the conference call going on and you know how conference calls are Either one or two people dominate it or everyone s like Oh can I no but everyone interrupting and cutting each other off It s very difficult to coordinate a conference call because people can t see one another which makes it hard to manage the interrupt logic In Joi s conference call the interrupt logic got moved to the chat room People would type Hand and the moderator of the conference call will then type You re speaking next in the chat So the conference call flowed incredibly smoothly Meanwhile in the chat people are annotating what people are saying Oh that reminds me of So and so s work Or You should look at this URL you should look at that ISBN number In a conference call to read out a URL you have to spell it out No no no it s w w w dot net dash In a chat window you get it and you can click on it right there You can say in the conference call or the chat Go over to the wiki and look at this This is a broadband conference call but it isn t a giant thing It s just three little pieces of software laid next to each other and held together with a little bit of social glue This is an incredibly powerful pattern It s different from Let s take the Lotus juggernaut and add a web front end And finally and this is the thing that I think is the real freakout is ubiquity The web has been growing for a long long time And so some people had web access and then lots of people had web access and then most people had web access But something different is happening now In many situations all people have access to the network And all is a different kind of amount than most All lets you start taking things for granted Now the Internet isn t everywhere in the world It isn t even everywhere in the developed world But for some groups of people students people in high tech offices knowledge workers everyone they work with is online Everyone they re friends with is online Everyone in their family is online And this pattern of ubiquity lets you start taking this for granted Bill Joy once said My method is to look at something that seems like a good idea and assume it s true We re starting to see software that simply assumes that all offline groups will have an online component no matter what It is now possible for every grouping from a Girl Scout troop on up to have an online component and for it to be lightweight and easy to manage And that s a different kind of thing than the old pattern of online community I have this image of two hula hoops the old two hula hoop world where my real life is over here and my online life is over there and there wasn t much overlap between them If the hula hoops are swung together and everyone who s offline is also online at least from my point of view that s a different kind of pattern There s a second kind of ubiquity which is the kind we re enjoying here thanks to Wifi If you assume whenever a group of people are gathered together that they can be both face to face and online at the same time you can start to do different kinds of things I now don t run a meeting without either having a chat room or a wiki up and running Three weeks ago I ran a meeting for the Library of Congress We had a wiki set up by Socialtext to capture a large and very dense amount of technical information on long term digital preservation The people who organized the meeting had never used a wiki before and now the Library of Congress is talking as if they always had a wiki for their meetings and are assuming it s going to be at the next meeting as well the wiki went from novel to normal in a couple of days It really quickly becomes an assumption that a group can do things like Oh I took my PowerPoint slides I showed them and then I dumped them into the wiki So now you can get at them It becomes a sort of shared repository for group memory This is new These kinds of ubiquity both everyone is online and everyone who s in a room can be online together at the same time can lead to new patterns Part Three What can we take for granted If these assumptions are right one that a group is its own worst enemy and two we re seeing this explosion of social software what should we do Is there anything we can say with any certainty about building social software at least for large and long lived groups I think there is A little over 10 years ago I quit my day job because Usenet was so interesting I thought This is really going to be big And I actually wrote a book about net culture at the time Usenet the Well Echo IRC and so forth It launched in April of 95 just as that world was being washed away by the web But it was my original interest so I ve been looking at this problem in one way or another for 10 years and I ve been looking at it pretty hard for the a year and a half or so So there s this question What is required to make a large long lived online group successful and I think I can now answer with some confidence It depends I m hoping to flesh that answer out a little bit in the next ten years But I can at least say some of the things it depends on The Calvinists had a doctrine of natural grace and supernatural grace Natural grace was You have to do all the right things in the world to get to heaven and supernatural grace was and God has to anoint you And you never knew if you had supernatural grace or not This was their way of getting around the fact that the Book of Revelations put an upper limit on the number of people who were going to heaven Social software is like that You can find the same piece of code running in many many environments And sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn t So there is something supernatural about groups being a run time experience The normal experience of social software is failure If you go into Yahoo groups and you map out the subscriptions it is unsurprisingly a power law There s a small number of highly populated groups a moderate number of moderately populated groups and this long flat tail of failure And the failure is inevitably more than 50 of the total mailing lists in any category So it s not like a cake recipe There s nothing you can do to make it come out right every time There are however I think about half a dozen things that are broadly true of all the groups I ve looked at and all the online constitutions I ve read for software that supports large and long lived groups And I d break that list in half I d say if you are going to create a piece of social software designed to support large groups you have to accept three things and design for four things Three Things to Accept 1 Of the things you have to accept the first is that you cannot completely separate technical and social issues There are two attractive patterns One says we ll handle technology over here we ll do social issues there We ll have separate mailing lists with separate discussion groups or we ll have one track here and one track there This doesn t work It s never been stated more clearly than in the pair of documents called LambdaMOO Takes a New Direction I can do no better than to point you to those documents But recently we ve had this experience where there was a social software discussion list and someone said I know let s set up a second mailing list for technical issues And no one moved from the first list because no one could fork the conversation between social and technical issues because the conversation can t be forked The other pattern that s very very attractive anybody who looks at this stuff has the same epiphany which is Omigod this software is determining what people do And that is true up to a point But you cannot completely program social issues either So you can t separate the two things and you also can t specify all social issues in technology The group is going to assert its rights somehow and you re going to get this mix of social and technological effects So the group is real It will exhibit emergent effects It can t be ignored and it can t be programmed which means you have an ongoing issue And the best pattern or at least the pattern that s worked the most often is to put into the hands of the group itself the responsibility for defining what value is and defending that value rather than

    Original URL path: http://everything2.com/title/Online+Community+Dynamics (2016-02-12)
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  • clampe - Everything2.com
    visit http www msu edu lampecli User Bookmarks Sort by name Sort by date Archived E2 Glossary dustfromamoth E2 Community Development Newsletter Summer 2007 E2 Copyright Changes E2 FAQ Etiquette on Everything2 Everything Statistics September 29 2001 2 Field guide to slashdot trolls God Powers and How to Use Them High school can kill you Hot Damn 5 The Dysfunctional Family Reunion Strikes Back HOT DAMN An E2 gathering in Ohio How to get a pseudo random signature iggy114 information Kurt Message Inbox MUD New E2 Discussion Feature Node Row Norse Mythology Roast turkey breast rubbed with spicy garlic paste RyanP sam512 School of Information Analysis of Everything 2 slashdot troll Slashdot Troll s Greatest Hits Some thoughts about the Language of Thought Summit in Savannah The Borg Clinic The Down Side The Node Code The Tales of Alvin Maker This life is a placement test for the next Two States Five Senses The Michigan and New York Apple Gathering voluntary simplicity Websites that can improve your writeups weekend sound track Who Killed What Sign in Login Password remember me Lost password Sign up Need help accounthelp everything2 com Recommended Reading About Everything2 User Picks 2016 New Hampshire Democratic Primary

    Original URL path: http://everything2.com/title/clampe (2016-02-12)
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