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  • Expat Exchange - Are You Financially Ready to Live Abroad? 7 Financial Tips To Help You Live A Global Lifestyle - Moving Overseas - International Living - International Jobs - Expatriate
    of documentation is needed What fees are associated with the account especially for international transactions What are the main features of the account i e interest bearing multi currency Daily limits on deposits and withdrawals at the ATM and in the branch with a teller If you anticipate having credit needs what are the requirements restrictions for foreigners non residents to apply for credit and what are the consequences for non repayment and late payments some countries have centralized credit bureaus that create a black mark against you in the country possibly baring you from employment housing and leaving the country In some countries not paying your debt can lead to criminal charges and jail time What are the restrictions on foreign exchange and moving money outside the country Especially for foreigners non residents there could be restrictions for exchanging the local currency and sending money abroad This could be quite impactful if you are dependent on your host country income to take care of home country financial obligations What are the customer service capabilities Are English language services provided 24 hours a day 7 days a week Is there a toll free or collect telephone number Can you conduct routine banking transactions without coming to the branch Over the phone via online or mobile banking Have a Toolbox of Global Financial Solutions at your disposal You never know what financial challenge you are going to meet living a global lifestyle Get used to carrying a toolbox of global financial solutions so you can have the appropriate tool within reach when you are faced with a financial dilemma At a minimum your global toolbox of financial solutions should include multi currency ATM Debit cards and credit cards that are pin and chip enhanced If possible keep a pre paid card or two in different currencies on hand as well Also having a line of credit to tap into could solve temporary cash flow issues Include options for moving money and making payments Although a bit costly you can always rely on the old standbys like wire transfers and Western Union Don t forget the online payment pioneer PayPal as their global reach is always expanding For your new home country financial obligations always search around for local players like M Pesa in Africa Invest in a consultation with a licensed qualified tax professional If you are a U S citizen and subject to taxation on worldwide income this is a non negotiable As a U S citizen you are never outside of the reach of the IRS In the back of your U S passport it states your obligation to file and report on worldwide income however most U S citizens don t fully understand their U S tax filing obligation and think that because they are moving abroad and will earn income outside the U S their U S tax financial obligation ends If you are on an international assignment for your company and they are handling your taxes proceed cautiously The tax provider works for your company not you and ultimately you are responsible for any tax liability Also make sure you are knowledgeable about your unique tax filing requirements and potential tax liability in your new host country Seek professional advice in other areas important to living a global lifestyle If living a global lifestyle will become a way of life for you investing in experienced professional advice in all areas related to living a global lifestyle is a good investment A consultation with an immigration attorney can help keep those inevitable ever changing immigration and visa issues at bay Meeting with a local insurance broker who can give you an overview of insurance options available in your new host country is also valuable Securing comprehensive medical insurance should be at the top of your list Before departing your home country review your international medical coverage You don t want to have a serious medical emergency overseas and discover that you don t have comprehensive global coverage If earning income outside your home country is now a key part of your cash flow then you will need to find a reliable licensed investment advisor experienced in helping people who need to manage assets globally help you navigate planning for your children s education your retirement and estate planning Take sufficient security precautions with your finances Global fraud is on the rise and many people experience identity theft when they are living abroad As a rule of thumb always password protect your computer and all mobile devices i e iphone ipad Change your passwords every 30 60 days Make sure you always use a Wi Fi connection with a password and for an added layer of protection always use a VPN virtual private network Use the same safety precautions you would at home Never walk away from an ATM machine without making sure that you have completed your transaction Although ATMs will time out you could still give a thief ample time to see enough of your financial information to make you an easy target for a robbery Use an online document storage service to keep copies of all important documents especially those that could be used to verify your identification like the photo page of your passport a driver s license or birth certificate Although you should minimize your mail delivery by setting up automated payments and receiving financial statements online consider retaining a U S address In the U S due to financial difficulties most post offices are closing Also post 9 11 a P O box address is considered a red flag to most companies Choosing an independent online mail management service to sort open and scan mail based on your instructions and accept packages on your behalf is an efficient and safe way to manage your mail while you are living a global lifestyle Also you can have some assurances that your mail will be discarded and shredded confidentially Many of these mail companies

    Original URL path: http://www.expatexchange.com/article/4052/Are-You-Financially-Ready-to-Live-Abroad--7-Financial-Tips-To-Help-You-Live-A-Global-Lifestyle- (2016-02-11)
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  • Expat Exchange - Managing Currency Risk: Practical Guide to Building a Globally Diversified, Multi-currency Investment Portfolio - currency risk, currency exchange, expat finance
    held by the fund or ETF owned through the account Example Two different currencies two different exchanges same investment Let s consider the example of an American investor living in Denmark who wants to buy a basket of European stocks as a long term euro denominated stock market investment A European broker might advise him to buy the Dublin Ireland listed euro denominated ETF ticker symbol EUE EUE invests in a basket of stocks based on the EURO STOXX 50 Index 50 large European companies That would indeed give the investor solid exposure to a well diversified list of top European company shares However the American investor could also have taken his money converted it to dollars and through a U S broker bought a virtually identical investment a New York listed dollar denominated ETF ticker symbol FEZ FEZ is based on the same EURO STOXX 50 Index and therefore holds the same basket of European company stocks In this case even though the ETFs are denominated in different currencies the underlying investments held by the two ETFs are identical and have the same currency denomination euro The currency denominations of the ETFs are just a convenience for the New York or Dublin exchanges It does not change the currency denomination or any other characteristics of the underlying investments held by the ETFs Therefore the performance of the investments will also be identical To compensate for the change in exchange rate the returns of each ETF measured in their own currency will differ by an amount exactly equal to the change in the exchange rate Hence owning either the euro denominated ETF or the USD denominated ETF will result in an equivalent investment return It is important to recognize that this is in contrast to the CD example provided earlier In that example the underlying investments the CDs themselves were denominated in different currencies and hence were fundamentally different investments and had different investment outcomes To demonstrate this conclusion we tracked the performance of the two funds over the period December 31 2005 to December 31 2010 We found that FEZ the USD ETF gained a total of 3 4 while EUE the Euro ETF lost 8 7 That is to say that the USD denominated FEZ outperformed its euro cousin EUE by 12 over the period Over the same period the USD declined 12 against the euro from 1 18 to 1 32 Therefore the investment performance difference between the two funds is exactly offset by the change in the currency over the period At the end of the period both investments are worth precisely the same amount whether expressed in USD or euros Hence it made no difference from an investment performance point of view if the investor bought the euro ETF from a European broker or the USD ETF from a U S broker This result is what we expected for reasons discussed above We reiterate that what matters is not the currency denomination of the ETF

    Original URL path: http://www.expatexchange.com/article/3883/Managing-Currency-Risk-Practical-Guide-to-Building-a-Globally-Diversified,-Multi-currency-Investment-Portfolio (2016-02-11)
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  • Expat Exchange - Managing Currency Risk: As an American Abroad, In What Currency Should I Save and Invest? - Currency Risk, Currency, Expat Finance
    it clear that if the family had known in advance that their daughter would be attending a UK university they would have wanted to purchase a BPS 4 5 year CD If they had done so they would have made an investment that provided 22 more university expense buying power in the UK The appreciation of the pound against the dollar would have had no impact on their university savings plan In this case the two CDs were fundamentally different investments The investment asset needed to be matched with the university expense liability and if this had been done correctly currency risk would have been eliminated from the family s university savings plan From this stylized education savings example we can extrapolate to an expat family s entire financial life Thinking through the currency denomination of all our life liabilities is the starting point for choosing the currency denomination of our investment portfolios It follows therefore that if we expect to live in Europe for five years on an expat assignment but then return to the U S where we will live the rest of our lives educate our child and retire then our investment assets should be primarily USD denominated Our investment portfolio should be heavily oriented towards U S stocks and bonds even though we are temporarily living in Europe In this way we are matching our liabilities with our assets On the other hand if we expect to remain permanently in Europe then our liabilities will be primarily euro denominated and we therefore need to anchor our investment portfolio around euro denominated stocks and bonds In both scenarios however a properly diversified portfolio will still include significant investments in both euros and USD Hedging against an uncertain geography Of course it is quite common today for many international individuals and families to have no clear idea where they will end up or how long they will be there In such cases we have to make projections based on the most likely possible scenarios and then build a portfolio that is still highly diversified across a variety of currencies so that our career and retirement decisions are not constrained by large changes in relative currency valuations We want to avoid being tied to one currency if our geographical future and hence also our life liabilities are uncertain But do I not need to protect myself from a declining dollar We often hear Americans abroad express deep skepticism about the outlook for the Dollar As a result they often seek out currency investment schemes that promise profit for the investor in the event that the dollar declines When analyzing such schemes however it is extremely important to understand that currencies unlike stocks or bonds are a zero sum investment game for one currency to appreciate another one must depreciate Betting on currencies therefore is truly akin to gambling because the random odds are that you will lose more than half the time once the middleman the broker selling you

    Original URL path: http://www.expatexchange.com/article/3880/Managing-Currency-Risk-As-an-American-Abroad,-In-What-Currency-Should-I-Save-and-Invest- (2016-02-11)
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  • Expat Exchange - - Tip for Living in
    Malaysia Malta Martinique Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Morocco Namibia Nepal Netherlands New Zealand Nicaragua Nigeria Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Qatar Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Lucia Saudi Arabia Scotland Senegal Serbia Singapore Slovak Republic Slovenia Somalia South Africa Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Sweden Switzerland Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Trinidad Tob Turkey Turkmenistan UAE Uganda UK Ukraine United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Venezuela Vietnam Yemen Zaire Zambia Zimbabwe Join Sign In Home Costa Rica Forum Costa Rica Guide Costa Rica Resources Costa Rica Real Estate International Jobs Home Costa Rica Forum Costa Rica Guide Costa Rica Resources Costa Rica Real Estate International Jobs Costa Rica Costa Rica Newsletter 10 Tips for Living in Costa Rica Expat Tips Costa Rica Expat Blogs Costa Rica Travel Warnings City Guides Guide to Living in San Jose Resources Expat Health Insurance Mail Forwarding Mail Shipping Relocation Auto Shipping Auto Expat Tax Real Estate Agencies Business Services Currency Exchange Education Expat Banking Expat Counseling Expat Finance International Jobs Language Cross Cultural Legal Services for Expats Pet Shipping Travel Insurance Visa Immigration Real Estate Listings Property Advice Local Experts View Properties by Country Afghanistan Albania Argentina Australia Austria Bahamas Belgium Belize Brazil Bulgaria Canada Chile China Colombia Costa Rica Czech Rep Dominican Rep Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Estonia Fiji France Germany Guatemala Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kenya Korea Kuwait Macedonia Malaysia Mexico Morocco Nepal New Zealand Nicaragua Norway Panama Philippines Portugal Romania Russia Saudi Arabia Scotland Singapore South Africa Spain Sri Lanka Sweden Switzerland Tanzania Thailand Trinidad Tobago Turkey UAE Uganda UK Uruguay US Vietnam Add a Property Listing Tweet Nuevo Arenal Costa Rica Property for Sale 5 Bedroom Full Bath Half Bath Price 695 000 House for Sale in Nuevo Arenal Costa Rica An impeccable 3 000 square foot home with excellent views of Lake Arenal and the surrounding rainforest and mountains The carefully designed 2 storey house has every luxury tongue and groove cathedral ceilings porcelain flooring and many large windows for natural lightingand to take andavntage of the views An impeccable 3 000 square foot home with excellent views of Lake Arenal and the surrounding rainforest and mountains The carefully designed 2 storey house has every luxury tongue and groove cathedral ceilings porcelain flooring and many large windows for natural lightingand to take andavntage of the views Contact Details Marc Royal http lakearenalrealestate com homes property 196 elegant and spacious house with pool and guest house fully furnished nuevo arenal arenallakepartners72 gmail com 506 2694 5000 Job Real Estate Update Receive weekly updates of new job opportunities and real estate listings worldwide in our Job Property Update Subscribe Unsubscribe List a Property free Real Estate in Costa Rica View All Properties Esterillos Este Costa Rica Property for Sale San Isidro de El General Perez Zeledon Costa Rica Property for Sale Heredia Costa Rica Property for Sale Add a free Property Listing or Rental Listing Costa Rica Guide Costa

    Original URL path: http://www.expatexchange.com/eetr/72601/33/6/real-estate/costa-rica/House-for-Rent-in-Nuevo-Arenal-Costa-Rica (2016-02-11)
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  • Expat Exchange - The Ultimate Guide to Understanding Foreign Bank Account Reporting Requirements for Americans Living Abroad - FBAR, 8938, Expat Tax
    accounts and the financial institutions those accounts are held with to report their contents to the IRS The FBAR Form TD F 90 22 1 is also intended to identify unreported foreign generated or maintained income but is filed with the Treasury Department rather than the IRS Who needs to report Both Form 8938 and the FBAR are required for US citizens and resident aliens with an interest in foreign accounts meeting assigned thresholds Additionally the FBAR must be completed for trusts estates and domestic entities that meet the reporting requirements Form 8938 has higher thresholds for US expats single filers with more than 200 000 on the last day of the tax year or over 300 000 at any time during the tax year and married filing jointly taxpayers with more than 400 000 on the last day of the tax year or over 600 000 at any time during the tax year The FBAR is necessary when the total value of assets for all accounts in foreign financial institutions exceeds 10 000 at any point during the year For Form 8938 the taxpayer is reporting the maximum value of foreign financial assets including financial accounts and specified foreign non account investment assets In the FBAR it is the maximum value of financial accounts maintained by a financial institution physically located in a foreign country A specific breakdown of what types of accounts meet the requirements for Form 8938 and FBAR can be found on this IRS chart Filing Among the most significant differences between Form 8938 and the FBAR involves filing deadlines and instructions Form 8938 is filed with the taxpayer s US expat tax return the same deadlines and extensions apply so for example if you have an extension on your US expat tax return to October 15th you may file form 8938 also by October 15th The IRS accepts returns by the date postmarked On the other hand the FBAR is filed with the Treasury Department with a deadline of June 30th and no extensions are allowed in addition the form must be received by the Treasury Department by that date not simply postmarked As a result of FATCA in many cases the information reported by Form 8938 is also reported by foreign financial institutions directly to the IRS Depending on the specific situation a taxpayer may need to file one or both There are some account types that are required to be listed on both forms Penalties There are considerable penalties involved with both FATCA requiring Form 8938 and the FBAR Failing to disclose accounts via Form 8938 can result in a 10 000 fine plus an additional 10 000 for every 30 days of non filing with a maximum penalty of 60 000 If the FBAR non filing is determined to be non willful the taxpayer can be fined up to 10 000 However if the non compliance is found to be willful the fine can be up to the greater of 100 000

    Original URL path: http://www.expatexchange.com/article/4217/Expat-Taxes-The-Ultimate-Guide-to-Understanding-Foreign-Bank-Account-Reporting-Requirements-for-Americans-Living-Abroad (2016-02-11)
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  • Expat Exchange - FBAR and Jail. What do they have in common? - FBAR, Exapt Tax, FACTA
    been a hot topic for several years The history of the FBAR goes back to the Bank Secrecy Act of 1970 and Title 31 of the US Tax Code However only recently the IRS has started to enforce the rules and even prosecute individuals This is the latest FBAR case Christopher B of California pleaded guilty to a willful failure to file the FBAR He is scheduled to be sentenced on July 8 2013 What led him to jail Some poor advice and his desire to hide income Chris B worked as a consultant His business was booming One day he approached a vice president of banking at UBS in San Francisco who advised him to set up an account in Switzerland and shelter a part of his consulting income from the IRS Chris B deposited more than 600 000 in his UBS account from 2001 to 2005 Chris did not report this income to the IRS Moreover he lavishly spent this money to buy a car to travel in Europe and to pay for Eurocard Chris B did not declare this income on his tax returns He did not disclose the existence of his account to his CPA either The total tax harm is estimated at 270 757 Chris B faces not only the penalty in the amount up to 250 000 but also a jail time up to five years The FBARs penalties are enormous and can wipe out the entire account Combating offshore tax evasion continues to be one of the IRS top priorities said Richard Weber Chief Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation Americans who failed to file the FBAR should not wait any longer In 2014 the foreign financial institutions will be required to report the accounts owned by U S persons Currently several countries United Kingdom Denmark Mexico Ireland Switzerland have already signed the FATCA agreements with the USA More than 50 countries have started FATCA discussions with the IRS More and more foreign financial institutions specifically request to sign the intergovernmental agreement to avoid any disruption to the financial system The latest requests were sent by the Caribbean Community and Chilean Association of Banks and Financial Institutions American expatriates with past due tax returns and FBARs are advised to contact an expat tax preparer and become compliant to avoid any penalties and criminal prosecution About the Author ZM Ishmurzina MBA CPA She is the principal at Artio Partners Artio Partners is a CPA firm for American expatriates living abroad and dual citizens We specialize in past due expat tax returns and complex international tax issues like FBARs FATCA foreign tax credit foreign real estate PFIC foreign adoption and controlled foreign corporations For more information please visit http www artiopartners com Write a Comment about this Article Sign In to post a comment Comments about this Article guest Mar 25 2013 10 46 The FBAR filing is only required if you have 10 000 or more in aggregate funds in foreign bank accounts otherwise you

    Original URL path: http://www.expatexchange.com/article/4183/Expat-Tax-FBAR-and-Jail-What-do-they-have-in-common (2016-02-11)
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  • Expat Exchange - The HIRE Act, FBAR and FATCA - The HIRE Act, FBAR, FATCA
    Article guest Feb 18 2013 08 46 FBAR reporting Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts FBAR http www irs gov Businesses Small Businesses Self Employed Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts 28FBAR 29 FATCA reportiung Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act FATCA http www irs gov Businesses Corporations Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act 28FATCA 29 guest Feb 18 2013 10 05 Are you sure that the FBAR requirement kicked in for the year 2010 I believe it covered many years already before 2010 What is the real datei if anyone knows guest Feb 18 2013 12 01 There is a real question as to whether the HIRE Act its severe FBAR penalties other reporting and notably the entire FATCA new bilateral treaty schemes will actually raise much revenues in unpaid income taxes or even in draconian fines or whether all of this will result in a further erosion of US business not to mention possibly a lot more in enforcement expenses compared to uncovered unpaid tax liabilities One result we see at Expatriation Copesthesia Consultants are much greater US expatriations not from likely tax avoiders but from those fed up with the cost and aggravation of this type of unparalleled reporting Increasingly American citizens live and work abroad and many are finding they don t need this additional burden any longer Les Fant Danc Profile Private Message Feb 18 2013 12 50 So if I understand this You can not have more than 10 000 00 U S dollars in a foreign bank at anytime and your home can not be worth more than 50 000 00 U S Dollars Is that what this new law means to me guest Feb 18 2013 21 33 I Love these new FREEDOMS I now enjoy as an american caughtintheact Profile Private Message Feb 18 2013 22 35 Some good guest comments Guest is correct that the FBAR is older than 2009 see http www taxlitigator com articles FBar htm which claims that it goes back to 1970 But the Secretary of the Treasury has an option to enforce it and thus presumably not to enforce it It is now being enforced Guest is also correct that it is unlikely to raise significant revenue but there will be other impacts as foreign banks are reportedly already refusing to let Americans open bank accounts in some countries In some countries foreigners are required to put a certain amount of money into the bank in the country where they live and if this amount puts Americans over the threshold the burden of proof will be on the taxpayer to prove where the money came from For the FBAR report it will definitely put Americans over the threshold in for example Thailand and that could put Americans over the threshold for the FATCA reporting as well Given that the United States is the only country that imposes requirements like this on its citizens living abroad and imposes penalties on foreign banks it will make it harder for American companies to do business overseas as well As for Danc s comment you can have as much money as you wish in foreign bank accounts However if the aggregate at any time during a calendar year is more than 99 999 99 then you must file an FBAR report However if the assets in bank accounts and investments total 50 000 reported by the foreign bank are 50 000 or more you may be liable to pay taxes on some of that money and there will be stiff penalties if you do not make a report for either FBAR or FATCA I strongly suggest that you go to the IRS web site and read about these two requirements FBAR reporting Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts FBAR http www irs gov Businesses Small Businesses Self Employed Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts 28FBAR 29 FATCA reportiung Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act FATCA http www irs gov Businesses Corporations Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act 28FATCA 29 guest Feb 19 2013 15 03 In my post below I made an error about the FBAR report The number should have been 9 999 99 not 99 999 99 Danc Profile Private Message Feb 19 2013 16 13 I replied Bye mail sorry So if I understand this right If a person was to buy a home in Belize for a 100 000 and had 9 000 in the bank that person would have to file a FATCA report with the IRS each year But If a person was to buy a home for 30 000 in Belize and had 5 000 in the bank that person would not be required to file a FATCA report Thanks for your last reply I tried to access that 2009 taxlitigator web site I had no luck guest Feb 19 2013 23 53 Danc When you try the tailgater report site again use this link http www taxlitigator com articles FBar htm You might have been including punctuation after the htm The FBAR report is separate from the FATCA report It is as the name implies a report of the Foreign Bank and Foreign Financial Accounts that n American citizen has As far as I can tell it has nothing to do with real estate Having filed one it only asked for the names of the banks the branch address and maximum amount in each one during the year If you have say 3 foreign bank accounts like this Bank Name Maximum amount in account during the year dollar equivalent Bank A 3 999 99 Bank B 5 000 00 Bank C 1 000 00 Total 9 999 99 Since the total is less than 10 000 00 you would not be required to file an FBAR report But if the total were 10 000 00 you would have to file it If that money comes from transferring funds from the USA on which taxes were paid in the USA by deduction

    Original URL path: http://www.expatexchange.com/article/4168/US-Expat-Tax-Issues-The-HIRE-Act,-FBAR-and-FATCA (2016-02-11)
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  • Expat Exchange - US Expats: Do you have foreign bank accounts that you haven't told the IRS about? Now Is a Good Time to Fess Up! - Foreign Bank Accounts, Offshore Bank Accounts
    on the amount in the foreign accounts The penalty is based on the highest aggregate account balance between 2003 2010 You must file back tax returns or amendments and pay back taxes and interest for up to 8 years as well as any penalties that maybe due Everything is due by August 31st 2011 i e all original and amended tax returns All penalties and taxes due must be paid as well as any interest and accrued penalties If you are living abroad and the total of your aggregate accounts did not exceed 75 000 during this time period then you may qualify for a lower penalty threshold of 12 5 You may also qualify for a reduced penalty of 5 if you meet certain requirements If you meet all of the following If you did not open or cause the account to be opened Have exercised minimal infrequent contact with the account Have not withdrawn more than 1 000 from the account in any year between 2003 2010 unless to close the account Can show that all US taxes have been paid on the funds deposited into the account OR If you are a foreign resident and were unaware you were a US citizen How does this differ from the 2009 Special Voluntary Disclosure Program The 2009 Special Voluntary Disclosure Program which ended October 15th 2009 had a lower penalty rate In the 2009 program taxpayers faced up to a 20 penalty over a six year period The 2011 program includes a number of new provisions as well Approximately 15 000 taxpayers with bank accounts in more than 60 countries came forward as a result of the 2009 program One thing is clear the IRS is not going to reward people for waiting so it is likely that the penalties will only get more severe over time for non compliance What about for those people who came forward between the closing date of the 2009 Program and now Since the 2009 Special Voluntary Disclosure program ended an additional 3 000 individuals have come forward but until now many of these people have been in a state of limbo as the IRS had not clearly defined what penalties those individuals may face These individuals will be eligible for the terms of the 2011 program What If I Have Been Fully Compliant with all my US Expat Tax Returns but not the FBAR If you have been filing your US tax returns but have not filed the Foreign Bank Account Form FBAR Form TD F 90 22 1 then you may not need to worry about the voluntary disclosure The purpose of the voluntary disclosure is to provide a way for individuals who have not been reporting their taxable income to disclose this income and avoid criminal prosecution So if you have not been reporting your foreign bank accounts via the FBAR form but have paid tax on any income from these accounts then you should file the delinquent FBAR forms

    Original URL path: http://www.expatexchange.com/article/3789/US-Expats:-Do-you-have-foreign-bank-accounts-that-you-havent-told-the-IRS-about--Now-Is-a-Good-Time-to-Fess-Up! (2016-02-11)
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