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  • Firedocs Remote Viewing : The CRV Manual: Copyright Page
    future training programs Particular attention should be paid to the glossary at the end of the document and to the terms as defined in the text as they are the only acceptable definitions to be used when addressing the methodology presented It is suggested that the document be read several times to enhance understanding NOTE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DOCUMENT IS GOVERNED BY CORPORATE LAWS OF PROPRIETY INGO SWANN AN

    Original URL path: http://www.firedocs.com/remoteviewing/answers/crvmanual/copyright.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Firedocs Remote Viewing : The CRV Manual: Ingo Swann on the Copyright Issue
    by various people to suit their needs I believe it was a group written document it wasn t written by just one person PJ I don t have any way to know if the info in the manual is accurate pause I wasn t asked to participate in the writing of it I found out it existed sometime after PJ Your methods have become a very big deal high priced even cults have grown up around them or versions of them Just because I once played a role in the research does not mean this role can be extended to cover everything that has happened in the field since then PJ I could take the copyright cover off if you think it s misleading If you do that people will say you re editing it PJ You don t mind if I put it on the web I don t care You can say please say this first then I don t care what is said after that I did not write it I have never ever written a document like that PJ OK That s what Ingo said about it in a phone call Sunday 24 May 1998 4

    Original URL path: http://www.firedocs.com/remoteviewing/answers/crvmanual/swann01.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Firedocs Remote Viewing : The CRV Manual: Introduction by Paul H. Smith
    of 1985 our future was very uncertain However the branch chief together with Fred Skip Atwater the training and operations officer were hopeful that the unit would find a sponsor which indeed happened and decided to continue our training through Stage VI with the help of Nance s experience and considerable documentation and theoretical understanding that Atwater and others had managed to accrue At the conclusion of our training and with a number of successful operational and training projects under out belts to show that CRV really did work the further decision was made to try and capture in as pure a form as possible the Ingo methodology The reasoning was that we might never get any more out of house training approved yet we needed to be able to perpetuate the methodology even after the folks with the institutional memory eventually left the unit I had developed the reputation of being the word man in the unit plus Skip and the branch chief seemed to think I had a firm understanding and grasp of the theory and methodology so I was asked to write a manual capturing as much of the CRV methodology as possible with the assistance of the others who had been trained We pooled our notes and I wrote each section then ran it by the others for their suggestions and comments Corrections and suggestions were evaluated and added if it could be established that they matched true Ingo theory Skip and Tom both reviewed the manuscript and provided their input as well When the thing was finally done a copy was forwarded to Ingo who deemed it a comprehensive and accurate document Finally Skip provided a three page introductory section which it now turns out was apparently originally drafted by Joe McMoneagle The finished version was printed at the DIA press in May 1986 It was a specialty run and was never given an official DIA document number I don t believe any more than thirty or so were printed Things to keep in mind about the CRV manual It wasn t intended as a training manual per se and certainly not as a stand alone training manual It s primary purpose was to capture and preserve for posterity Ingo s methodology The very first page declares that it was prepared to serve as a comprehensive explanation of the theory and mechanics of CRV and as a guide for future training programs We certainly didn t develop it as a how to Since we always assumed any further training to be done would either involve Ingo or someone who had already been trained the manual did not incorporate lessons learned nor the practical implementation of CRV in an operational setting nor even to explain how one taught people to do CRV nor why CRV included certain points of theory and process in its methodological base There are of course lots of things to be said about all these points and we had ambitions at one

    Original URL path: http://www.firedocs.com/remoteviewing/answers/crvmanual/smith01.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Firedocs Remote Viewing : The CRV Manual: Cover Page
    N A T E R E M O T E V I E W I N G 1 MAY 1986 NEXT PAGE All contents on this website are Copyright 1995 2003 by Palyne PJ Gaenir All rights reserved Contact Info

    Original URL path: http://www.firedocs.com/remoteviewing/answers/crvmanual/crvmain.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Firedocs Remote Viewing : The CRV Manual: Table of Contents
    Clusters E Basic Words 25 F Aperture G Dimensionals H AOL 26 I Aesthetic Impact AI J Drills Exercises K Format 27 STAGE III A Concept B Definitions C Site Requirements 31 D The Six Primary Dimensionals E Aesthetic Impact F Motion Mobility 33 G Dimensional Expression on Paper H Movement Movement Exercises 35 I Analytic Overlay AOL in Stage III 36 J Format 37 STAGE IV 39 A Concept

    Original URL path: http://www.firedocs.com/remoteviewing/answers/crvmanual/crvmanual-01.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Firedocs Remote Viewing : The CRV Manual: Introduction
    monitoring by individuals outside the room The room is homogeneously colored acoustic tiled and featureless with light controlled by a dimmer so that environmental distractions can be minimized The session begins when the monitor provides cueing or prompting information geographic coordinates in this case to the remote viewer The remote viewer is given no additional identifying information and at this point has no conscious knowledge of the actual site For training purposes the monitor is allowed to know enough about the site to enable him to determine when accurate versus inaccurate information is being provided The session then proceeds with the monitor repeating the prompting information at appropriate intervals and providing necessary feedback The remote viewer generates verbal responses and sketches until a coherent response to the overall task requirement emerges c Post Session Dynamics After the session is over the remote viewer and monitor obtain specific information about the site in picture descriptive form The remote viewer and monitor then discuss the session results B Background In early 1980 an SRI International SRI I subcontractor developed a training procedure known as Coordinate Remote Viewing to satisfy R D demands on SRI I to enhance the reliability scientific replicability of remote viewing RV The subcontractor s approach to improving the reliability of RV was to focus on the control of those factor that in his view tend to introduce noise into the RV product imaginative environmental and interviewer overlays The basic components of this training procedure consist of 1 Repeated site address geographic coordinate presentation with quick reaction response by the remote viewing coupled with a restrictive format for reporting perceived information to minimize imaginative overlays 2 The use of a specially designed acoustic tiled relatively featureless homogeneously colored viewing chamber to minimize environmental overlays 3 The adoption of a

    Original URL path: http://www.firedocs.com/remoteviewing/answers/crvmanual/crvmanual-02.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Firedocs Remote Viewing : The CRV Manual: Theory
    the interface between the subconscious and conscious d Liminal At the limen verging on consciousness e Supraliminal Above the limen in the realm of conscious awareness f Conscious Perceiving apprehending or noticing with a degree of controlled thought or observation recognizing as something external Present especially to the senses Involving rational power perception and awareness By definition the conscious part of the human being is that portion of the human consciousness which is linked most closely to and limited by the material world g Autonomic Nervous System ANS A part of the vertebrate nervous system that innervates smooth and cardiac muscle and glandular tissues governs actions that are more or less automatic and consists of the sympathetic nervous system and the parasympathetic nervous system Webster s 3rd Int Unabr h Ideogram I The reflexive mark made on the paper as a result of the impingement of the signal on the autonomic nervous system and its subsequent transmittal through this system to the arm and hand muscles which transfers it through the pen onto the paper i Analytic Overlay AOL Conscious subjective interpretation of signal line data which may or may not be relevant to the site Discussed at length in STRUCTURE j Automatic vs Autonomic Reception and movement of the signal line information through the viewer s system and into objectification is an autonomic process as opposed to an automatic one which itself implies an action arising and subsiding entirely within the system rather than from without Note in the original document j was a typo listed as a second i NOTE When the word system is used without qualifiers such as autonomic etc it refers in a general sense to all the integrated and integrative biological and perhaps metaphysical as well elements and components of the viewer himself which enable him to function in this mode known as remote viewing 2 Discussion RV theory relies on a rather Freudian model of human consciousness levels The lowest level of consciousness is paradoxically named the unconscious All this label really means is that that part of our mental processes we know as physical awareness or consciousness does not have access to what goes on there It is apparently this part of the individual s psyche that first detects and receives the signal line From here it is passed to the autonomic nervous system When the signal line impinges on the ANS the information is converted into a reflexive nervous response conducted through muscular channels controlled by the ANS If so allowed this response will manifest itself as an ideogram At the same time the signal is passed up through the subconscious across the limen and into the lower fringes of the consciousness This is the highest state of consciousness from the standpoint of human material awareness However the normal waking consciousness poses certain problems for remote viewing occasioned largely because of the linear analytic thought processes which are societally enhanced and ingrained from our earliest stages of cognitive development While extremely useful in a society relying heavily on quantitative data and technological development such analytic thinking hampers remote viewing by the manufacture of what is known as analytic overlay or AOL As the signal line surges up across the limen and into the threshold areas of consciousness the mind s conscious analytic process feels duty bound to assign coherence to what at first blush seems virtually incomprehensible data coming from an unaccustomed source It must in other words make a logical assessment based on the impressions being received Essentially the mind jumps to one or a number of instantaneous conclusions about the incoming information without waiting for sufficient information to make an accurate judgement This process is completely reflexive and happens even when not desired by the individual involved Instead of allowing wholistic right brain processes through which the signal line apparently manifests itself to assemble a complete and accurate concept untrained left brain based analytic processes seize upon whatever bit of information seems most familiar and forms an AOL construct based on it For example a viewer has been given the coordinates to a large steel girder bridge A flash of a complex metal manmade structure may impinge on the limenary regions of the viewer s mind but so briefly that no coherent response can be made to it The conscious mind working at a much greater speed than the viewer expects perceives bits and pieces such as angles riveted girders and a sense of being roofed over and paved whereupon it suggests to the physical awareness of the viewer that the site is the outside of a large sports stadium The image is of course wrong but is at least composed of factual elements though these have been combined by the viewer s over eager analytical processes to form an erroneous conclusion E Learning Theory 1 Definitions a Overtraining The state reached when the individual s learning system is over saturated and is burned out analogous to a muscle that has been overworked and can no longer extend or contract until it is allowed to rest and rebuild fibers that have been broken down by the stress or reinforce those that have been newly acquired by new demands placed upon the muscle b Absorption Assimilation as by incorporation or by the digestive process c Cognitron A cognitron is an assemblage of neurons linked together by interconnecting synapses and which when stimulated by the mind s recall system produce a composite concept of their various subparts Each neuron is charged with an element of the overall concept which when combined with the elements of its fellow neurons produces the final concept which the cognitron represents As a human learns new facts skills or behaviors neurons are connecting into new cognitrons the connecting synapses of which are more and more reinforced with use d Neuron A nerve cell with all its processes The apparent fundamental physical building block of mental and nervous processes Neurons are the basic element in the formation

    Original URL path: http://www.firedocs.com/remoteviewing/answers/crvmanual/crvmanual-03.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Firedocs Remote Viewing : The CRV Manual: Structure
    Site N Data objectified by the viewer are elements of objects or locations near the site d Can t Feed Back CFB Monitor has insufficient feedback information to evaluate data produced by the viewer e Site S Tells the former that he has successfully acquired and debriefed the site In elementary training sessions this usually signifies the termination of the session At later stages when further information remains to be derived from the site the session may continue on beyond full acquisition of the site f Silence When information objectified by the trainee viewer is patently incorrect the monitor simply remains silent which the viewer may freely interpret as an incorrect response In line with the learning theory upon which this system is based the intent is to avoid reinforcing any negative behavior or response Therefore there is no feedback for an incorrect response and any other feedback information is strictly limited to those as defined above It should be noted here that the above refers to earlier stages of the training process Later stages do away with in session feedback to the viewer and at even later stages the monitor himself is denied access to any site information or feedback until the session is over 5 Self Correcting Characteristic The tendency of the ideogram to re present itself if improperly or incompletely decoded If at the iteration of the coordinate an ideogram is produced and then decoded with the wrong A B components or not completely decoded upon the next iteration of the coordinate the same ideogram will appear thereby informing the viewer that he has made an error somewhere in the procedure On rare occasions the ideogram will be re presented even when it has been properly decoded This almost inevitably occurs if the site is extremely uniform such as the middle of an ocean a sandy desert glacier etc where nothing else but one single aspect is present 6 AOL Analytic Overlay The analytic response of the viewer s mind to signal line input An AOL is usually wrong especially in early stages but often does possess valid elements of the site 5 that are contained in the signal line hence a light house may produce an AOL of factory chimney because of its tall cylindrical shape AOLs may be recognized in several ways First if there is a comparator present it looks like it s sort of etc the information present will almost inevitably be an AOL and should always be treated as one Secondly a mental image that is sharp clear and static that is there is no motion present in it and in fact it appears virtually to be a mental photograph of the site is also certainly AOL Hesitation in production of the B component in Stage I coordinate remote viewing or a response that is out of structure anywhere in the system 7 are also generally sure indicators that AOL is present Finally the monitor or viewer can frequently detect AOL by

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