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  • Firedocs Remote Viewing : The CRV Manual: Stage I
    such as a lake city and mountain all within the area designated by the coordinate This type of ideogram may occasion the necessity of taking a Too Much Break because of the volume of information contained in more than one major gestalt Caution must be exercised here since a single mark may actually represent either a double or multiple ideogram but may be mistaken for a single ideogram To ascertain this the signal line must be prompted by placing the pen on the mark and also to either side to determine if more than one A and B component is also present 4 Composite Pen leaves paper more than twice makes identical marks and produces one set of A and B components Things such as orchards antenna fields etc with numbers of identical components produce this type of ideogram E Vertical Horizontal Ideogram Orientation Ideograms may be encountered objectified either parallel with the plane of the horizon horizontal or perpendicular to it vertical For example the Gobi desert being predominantly flat wave sand would produce a motion portion of the Stage I A indicating a horizontal ideogram The Empire State Building however would produce some sort of vertical response such as up angle in the motion portion of the A indicating a vertical ideogram However a crucial point to remember is the objectification of the ideogram is completely independent either of what it looks like or its orientation on paper It is imperative to realize that what determines the vertical horizontal ideogram orientation is not the site s inherent manifestation of the physical world and not how or what direction it is executed on the paper or even the RVer s point of view since in Stage I there is no viewer site orientation in the dimensional plane Simply observing how the ideogram looks on paper will not give reliable clues as to what the orientation of the ideogram might be The ideogram objectified as across flat wavy for the Gobi Desert might on the paper be an up and down mark The ideogram for the Empire State Building could possibly be represented as oriented across the paper It is obvious then that ideograms can not be interpreted by what they look like but by the feeling motion component produced immediately following the ideogram The viewer must learn to sense the orientation of an ideogram as he executes it If unsuccessful on the first attempt the ideogram may be re prompted by moving the pen along it at the same tempo as it was produced with the viewer being alert to accurately obtain the missing information F I A B Formation As the monitor gives the prompting information coordinate etc the viewer writes it down on the left side of the paper then immediately afterwards places his pen on the paper again to execute the ideogram I This presents itself as a spontaneous mark produced on the paper by the motion of hand and pen Immediately upon execution of the

    Original URL path: http://www.firedocs.com/remoteviewing/answers/crvmanual/crvmanual-05.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Firedocs Remote Viewing : The CRV Manual: Stage II
    as the viewer objectifies his perceptions on the paper E Basic Words True Stage IIs are generally simple fundamental words dealing directly with a sensory experience i e rough red cold stinging smell sandy taste soft moist green gritty etc When objectified words go beyond the basics they are considered out of structure and therefore unreliable F Aperture After a proper Stage I Ideogram A B sequence has been executed the aperture which was at its narrowest point during Stage I opens to accommodate Stage II information Not only does this allow the more detailed sensory information to pass through to the viewer but it is accompanied by a correspondingly longer signal loiter time the information comes in more slowly and is less concentrated Towards the end of Stage II and approach the threshold of Stage III the aperture begins to expand even further allowing the acquisition of dimensionally related information see below G Dimensionals As the viewer proceeds through Stage II and approaches Stage III the aperture widens allowing the viewer to shift from a global gestalt perspective which is paramount through Stage I and most of Stage II to a perspective in which certain limited dimensional characteristics are discernable Dimensionals are words produced by the viewer and written down in structure to conceptualize perceived elements of this new dimensional perspective he has now gained through the widening of the aperture These words demonstrate five dimensional concepts vertical ness horizontal ness angularity space or volume and mass While at first glance the concept of mass seems to be somewhat inappropriate to the dimensional concept mass in this case can be conceived in in dimensionally related terms as in a sense being substance occupying a specific three dimensional area Generally received only in the latter portion of Stage II dimensionals are usually very basic tall wide long big More complex dimensionals such as panoramic are usually received at later stages characterized by wider aperture openings If these more complex dimensionals are reported during Stage II they are considered out of structure and therefore unreliable H AOL Analytic overlay is considerably more rare in Stage II than it is in Stage I Though it does occasionally occur something about the extremely basic sensory nature of the data bits being received strongly tends to avoid AOL Some suppositions suggest that the sensory data received comes across either at a low enough energy level or through a channel that does not stimulate the analytic portion of the mind to action In effect the mind is fooled into thinking Stage II information is being obtained from normal physical sensory sources The combination of true sensory data received in Stage II may produce a valid signal line image consisting of colors forms and textures Stage II visuals or other true signal line visuals of the site may be distinguished from an AOL in that they are perceived as fuzzy indistinct and tending to fade in and out as one attempts to focus on its constituent

    Original URL path: http://www.firedocs.com/remoteviewing/answers/crvmanual/crvmanual-06.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Firedocs Remote Viewing : The CRV Manual: Stage III
    this place to Vertigo to I feel sick to This is boring to I m impressed by how tall this is to Absolutely massive The viewer by taking this AI Break effectively disengages himself temporarily from the signal line and allows the emotional response to dissipate The time required for this can vary from a few brief seconds for a mild AI to hours for one that is especially emphatic It is important to note that though many sites elicit essentially the same response in every individual who remote views it each person is different than every other and therefore under certain circumstances and with certain sites AI responses may differ significantly from viewer to viewer One example of this that has frequently been related is a small sandy spit off of Cape Cod Massachusetts One viewer a highly gregarious woman who enjoys social interactions when given the site responded that it made her feel bleak lonesome depressed abandoned On the other hand a viewer who had spent a great deal of his time in nature and away from large numbers of other humans experienced the site as beautiful and refreshing Since AI is subjective such variations are not unexpected and under the right circumstances are usually appropriate F Motion Mobility Two variations of the concept of movement are recognized as being available to the viewer during Stage III The first is the idea of motion at the site an object or objects at the site may be observed as they shift position or are displaced from one location to another For example there may be automobile traffic present a train moving through the area or whirling or reciprocating machinery etc Mobility the second movement concept is the ability possessed by the viewer in Stage III to shift his viewpoint to some extent from point to point about the site and from one perspective to another i e further back closer up from above or below etc This ability makes possible the projection of trackers and sketches as described below An additional feature this introduces is the ability to shift focus of awareness from one site to another using a polar coordinate concept This is more fully explained under Movement Movement Exercises which follows G Dimensional Expression on Paper 1 Sketches a Spontaneous sketches With the expansion of the aperture and after dissipation of AI the viewer is prepared to make representations of the site dimensional aspects with pen on paper A sketch is a rapidly executed general idea of the site In some cases it may be high representational of the actual physical appearance of the site yet in other cases only portions of the site appear The observed accuracy or aesthetic qualities of a sketch are not particularly important The main function of the sketch is to stimulate further intimate contact with the signal line while continuing to aid in the suppression of the viewer s subjective analytic mental functionings Sketches are distinguished from drawings by the convention that drawings are more deliberate detailed representations and are therefore subject to far greater analytic and therefore AOL producing interpretation in their execution b Analytic Sketches Analytic sketches are produced using a very carefully controlled analytic process usually employed only when a satisfactory spontaneous sketch as described above is not successfully obtained An analytic sketch is obtained by first listing all dimensional responses obtained in the session including those contained in the A components of the various Coordinate I A B prompting sequences in the order and frequency they manifest themselves on the session transcript Each of these dimensional elements apparently manifests itself in order of its importance to the gestalt of which it is a part So for example if in the first A component of the session one encounters across rising thee two would head the list and their approximate placement on the paper will be determined by the viewer before any other A second list is then compiled listing all secondary attributes of the site Finally a list may be made if desired of any significant details that do not fit into the previous two categories In analytic sketching the intuitive part of the viewer s apparatus is not shut off He must continue to attempt to feel the proper placement of the dimensional elements of the site In fact the purpose of this approach to sketching is to re ignite the viewer s intuition As each element on the primary list is taken in order the viewer must feel the proper position for that element in relation to the others If the dimensional element round is listed it must be determined how a rounded element fits in with across rising flat wide long and any other dimensional elements that may have preceded it When elements from the primary list are exhausted the viewer may duplicate the process with those from the secondary list If necessary and desirable the viewer may proceed to the details list and assign them their appropriate locations 2 Trackers Stage III contact with the site may on occasion produce an effect known as a tracker This is executed by a series of closely spaced dots or dashed lines made by pen on paper and describes a contour profile or other dimensional aspect of the site Trackers are formed in a relatively slow and methodical manner The viewer holds pen in hand lifting it off the paper between each mark made thereby allowing the autonomic nervous system through which the signal line is being channeled to determine the placement of each successive mark While constructing a tracker it is possible for the viewer to spontaneously change from executive the tracker to executing a sketch and back again 3 Spontaneous Ideograms At any point in the sketch tracker process an ideogram may spontaneously occur This most probably relates to a sub gestalt of the site and should be treated like any other ideogram It will produce A and B components Stage IIs and so

    Original URL path: http://www.firedocs.com/remoteviewing/answers/crvmanual/crvmanual-07.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Firedocs Remote Viewing : The CRV Manual: Stage IV
    viewer can to some extent look through the AOL image to perceive the actual site The advantage of AOL S in Stage IV is that it allows the information to be used without calling a break One can ask What is this trying to tell me about the site As an example the viewer may perceive the Verazzano Narrows Bridge when in fact the site is actually the George Washington Bridge 5 Dimensionals Dimensionals have an even broader meaning here than in Stage III In Stage IV more detailed and complex dimensionals can be expected and are now considered to be in structure and therefore more reliable Spired twisted edged partitioned etc are only a few examples C Stage IV Matrix To provide the necessary structure for coherent management of this information matrix column headings are constructed across the top of the paper thusly S 2 D AI EI T I AOL AOL S These headings stand for the following 1 S 2 Stage II information sensory data 2 D Dimensionals 3 AI Aesthetic Impact 4 EI Emotional Impact 5 T Tangibles 6 I Intangibles 7 AOL Analytic Overlay 8 AOL S AOL Signal D Session Format and Mechanics As the viewer produces Stage IV responses generally single words that describe the concepts received via the signal line they are entered in the matrix under their appropriate categories The matrix is filled in left to right going from the more sense based Stage IIs and dimensional towards the ever more refined information to the right and top to bottom following the natural flow of the signal line Stage IV information similar to that of Stage II comes to the viewer in clusters Some particular aspect of the site will manifest itself and the sub elements pertaining to that aspect will occur relatively rapidly to the viewer in the general right to left and top to bottom pattern just described Some degree of vertical spacing can be expected between such clusters an indication that each of these clusters represents a specific portion of the site Entries in a properly filled in matrix will tend to move slantwise down the page from the upper left to lower right with some amount of moving back and forth from column to column Stage IIs and dimensionals retain their importance in site definition while AOLs and AIs once they have been recognized and objectified as such so not require a major interruption in the flow of the signal line as was the case in previous stages In fact AOLs now frequently become closely associated with the site and may lead directly to AOL matching or AOL Signal as it is categorized in the matrix and described above EI tends to manifest itself comparatively more slowly than information in other categories If people are present for example EI pertaining to them may be effectively retrieved by placing the pen in the EI column of the matrix Several moments of subsequent waiting may then be required for

    Original URL path: http://www.firedocs.com/remoteviewing/answers/crvmanual/crvmanual-08.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Firedocs Remote Viewing : The CRV Manual: Stage V
    aforementioned components during Stage IV the overall cognitron concept is able to pass into the conscious awareness of the viewer with relative ease The sub elements themselves however have insufficient impetus to individually break unaided through the Liminal barrier into the consciousness of the viewer and must intentionally be invoked through the Stage V process It is suspected that the most amount of information will probably be derived from attribute or topic categories though at times both object and subject headings might provide significant volumes of information If as occasionally may happen all four categories are prompted and no responses result it can be supposed that one of two situations exist the response being stage fived is either already at its lowest form or it is really AOL D Implications The value of Stage V is readily apparent Though the sum total of the information obtained quite validly might produce the overall cognitron of religious in the context of an RV session once rendered down to its sub elements and details the cognitron produces a wealth of additional information of use to the analyst E Considerations The process has a few peculiarities and a few cautions to observe First one must be aware that not every cognitron necessarily produces responses for every category and in those that do some categories are inevitably more heavily represented than others In general the rule is that if the list of words that the viewer produces under the particular category being processed does not flow smoothly regularly rapidly and with obvious spontaneity the end of accessible information has been reached Therefore if there is a pause after the last word recorded of more than a few seconds the end of the cluster has probably been reached On the other hand if after the original prompting nothing comes forth spontaneously there are probably no accessible emanations pertaining to the cognitron being processed in that category For example if the viewer just sits with pen on paper with nothing to objectify after the viewer has written religious topics or other category and emanations then topic type information was probably not relevant to the formation of that cognitron If such a situation should occur either at the beginning of a category or at the end of one more productive the viewer should either on his own or with encouragement from the monitor declare an end to that particular category and move on to the next Usually the viewer is intuitively aware when more valid information remains to be retrieved and when the end of a cluster has been reached To sit too long waiting for more information if none is readily available engages the analytic process and encourages the generation of AOL The viewer must also be aware that some responses might at one time or another appear in any one or more of the category columns One example frequently given is warm Although one might consider this an attribute of some object related word as a

    Original URL path: http://www.firedocs.com/remoteviewing/answers/crvmanual/crvmanual-09.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Firedocs Remote Viewing : The CRV Manual: Stage VI
    through the earlier Stages his contact with the site is enhanced in quality and increased in extent Stage VI involves the viewer in direct 3 dimensional modeling and assessment of the site and or the relationship of Site T elements one to another Stage VI may be engaged at several different junctures after completion of Stage IV and or Stage V It can also be entered when Stage IV has stabilized appropriate AI has been encountered and dealt with and the viewer has become localized on a specific aspect of the site Because Stage IV data is collected by winking around the site thereby providing incongruent information the stabilization localization must occur prior to Stage VI After the Stage IV T has been modeled the session can proceed moving to Stage V or be continuing further with Stage VI E Session Mechanics As soon as the decision is made to proceed into Stage VI the viewer places in front of him the modeling material usually clay that has been kept nearby since the start of the session At the same time he also takes a blank piece of paper and writes a Stage VI Matrix on it As the viewer proceeds to manipulate the modeling material into the form s dimensions and relationships that feel right to him he maintains as his concentrated effort the perception of the site details that are freed to emerge into his consciousness by the kinesthetic experience of the modeling process These site data are recorded in their appropriate columns on the matrix as the Stage VI portion of the session continues 1 Matrix The Stage VI Matrix is identical in form to the Stage IV Matrix S 2 D AI EI T I AOL AOL S However it is labeled Stage VI for both record keeping purposes and because that matrix pertains to a specific locale in time space and not the entire site 2 Considerations In practice the viewer constructs the Stage VI Matrix sets it aside constructs a 3 dimensional model of Stage IV T s and records information perceived from the signal line During the modeling process the viewer must a Focus his awareness on the signal line not the model and the information which will begin to slow as the model is constructed and b Objectify that information within the prepared Stage VI Matrix The viewer must keep in mind that the model does not have to be a precise or accurate rendering It is the objectified information resulting from the modeling that is IMPORTANT F Format Following is the format for a typical Stage VI session FORMAT FOR STAGE VI Name Date Time Personal Inclemencies Visuals Declared STAGE I Coordinate Ideogram A Rising Angles Across Downs Solid B Structures STAGE II Sensory Data S2 rough smooth gritty texture grey white red blue yellow orange clean taste mixture of smells warm bright noisy STAGE II Dimensionals tall rounded wide long open AI BREAK Interesting I like it here Stage III

    Original URL path: http://www.firedocs.com/remoteviewing/answers/crvmanual/crvmanual-10.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Firedocs Remote Viewing : The CRV Manual: Glossary
    to the degree that impressions he is receiving are hopelessly entangled a Confusion Break is called Whatever time necessary is allowed for the confusion to dissipate and when necessary the cause for confusion is declared much like it is done with AOL The RV process is then resumed with an iteration of the coordinate Too Much Break TM Break When too much information is provided by the signal line all at once for the viewer to handle a Too Much Break is called and written down objectified telling the system to slow down and supply information in order of importance After the overload is dissipated the viewer may resume from the break normally with the reiteration of the coordinates A too much break is often indicated by an overly elaborate ideogram or ideograms Aesthetic Impact Break AI Break Will be discussed in conjunction with Stage III AOL Drive Break AOL D Bk This type of break becomes necessary when an AOL or related AOLs have overpowered the system and are driving the process as evidenced by the recurrence of a specific AOL two or more times producing nothing but spurious information 10 Once the AOL Drive is objectified the break time taken will usually need to be longer than that for a normal AOL to allow the viewer to fully break contact and allow to dissipate the objectionable analytic loop Bi location Break Bilo Bk When the viewer perceives he is too much absorbed in and transferred to the site and cannot therefore appropriately debrief and objectify site information or that he is too aware of and contained within the here and now of the remote viewing room only weakly connected with the signal line a Bilo break must be declared and objectified to allow the viewer to back out and then get properly recoupled with the signal line again 11 C Coding Encoding Decoding The information conveyed on the signal line is encoded that is translated into an information system a code allowing data to be transmitted by the signal line Upon receiving the signal the viewer must decode this information through proper structure to make it accessible This concept is very similar to radio propagation theory in which the main carrier signal is modulated to convey the desired information Coordinate Remote Viewing CRV The process of remote viewing using geographic coordinates for cueing or prompting D Dimension Extension in a single line or direction as length breadth and thickness or depth A line has one dimension length A plane has two dimensions length and breadth A solid or cube has three dimensions length breadth and thickness Dimensionals Dimensionals have a broader meaning in Stage IV than in Stage III In Stage IV more detailed and complex dimensionals can be expected and are now considered to be in structure and therefore more reliable Spired twisted edged partitioned etc are only a few examples Drawing The act of representing something by line etc E Emotional Impact The perceived emotions or feelings of the people at the site or of the viewer Sometimes the site itself possesses an element of emotional impact which is imprinted with long or powerful associations with human emotional response Evoking Evoke to call forth or up to summon to call forth a response elicit Iteration of the coordinate or alternate prompting method is the mechanism which evokes the signal line calling it up causing it to impinge on the autonomic nervous system and unconsciousness for transmittal through the viewer and on to objectification discussed at length in STRUCTURE F Feedback Those responses provided during the session to the viewer to indicate if he has detected and properly decoded site relevant information or information provided at some point after completion of the RV session or project to close the loop Correct abbreviated C The data bit presented by the trainee viewer is assessed by the monitor to be a true component of the site Probably Correct PC Data presented cannot be fully assessed by the monitor as being accurate site information but it would be reasonable to assume because of its nature that the information is valid for the site Near Site N Data objectified by the viewer are elements of objects or locations near the site Can t Feed Back CFB Monitor has insufficient feedback information to evaluate data produced by the viewer Site S Tells the former that he has successfully acquired and debriefed the site In elementary training sessions this usually signifies the termination of the session At later stages when further information remains to be derived from the site the session may continue on beyond full acquisition of the site Silence When information objectified by the trainee viewer is patently incorrect the monitor simply remains silent which the viewer may freely interpret as an incorrect response In line with the learning theory upon which this system is based the intent is to avoid reinforcing any negative behavior or response Therefore there is no feedback for an incorrect response and any other feedback information is strictly limited to those as defined above It should be noted here that the above refers to earlier stages of the training process Later stages do away with in session feedback to the viewer and at even later stages the monitor himself is denied access to any site information or feedback until the session is over G Gestalt A unified whole a configuration pattern or organized field having specific properties that cannot be derived from the summation of its component parts Major Gestalt The overall impression presented by all elements of the site taken for their composite interactive meaning The one concept that more than all others would be the best description of the site I I A B Sequence The core of all CRV structure the I A B sequence is the fundamental element of Stage I which is itself in turn the foundation for site acquisition 2 and further site detection and decoding in subsequent CRV stages

    Original URL path: http://www.firedocs.com/remoteviewing/answers/crvmanual/crvmanual-11.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Firedocs Remote Viewing : The CRV Manual: The End.
    that Psi Tech has been less than honest in their dealings with the public For instance it proves that a great deal of public slander and discrediting of other legitimate remote viewers competition which has been done by Ed Dames based on his supposedly unique and superior methods has zero basis in reality It proves that his TRV methods are in fact not unique and are boldly plagiarized from Ingo Swann renamed and sold as his own invention It proves that these methods have been advertised and sold to the public under less than completely honest pretenses and there s a whole subject itself on that point The posting of this manual could as a result be detrimental to the public image of Psi Tech However since a history of shockingly malicious public and private behavior by the two principals of the firm and many other events which normally harm businesses have not apparently impeded Psi Tech s success I trust that this manual will not either If you would like to view the correspondence relating to this claim of copyright infringement you can find it here http www firedocs com remoteviewing answers crvmanual claims1 html For the record the CRV manual was created in and dated 1986 It was written by Paul H Smith Major ret based on the methods of Mr Ingo Swann It was a work for hire by SRI I who paid Swann for proprietary methods development and the DIA who paid Smith to write the manual Either the document was classified provoking the question of why Mr Dames was disseminating it publicly six years before the project was declassified and that would make it government property or it was unclassified which puts it squarely in the public domain The U S Gov t cannot copyright

    Original URL path: http://www.firedocs.com/remoteviewing/answers/crvmanual/crvmanual-end.html (2016-02-13)
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