archive-com.com » COM » G » GLAMORGANWALKS.COM

Total: 61

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Local Features Mid
    using pack horses then tub boats were used on the Taff passing on to the feeder via a lock at Radyr Weir parts of this lock can still be seen alongside the feeder sluice In 1815 the tub boats were discontinued and a tramway constructed along the Taff Source information board on site Roman Villa Trelai There are several examples of Roman remains around Cardiff A succession of four forts existed on the site of what is now Cardiff Castle and there is the base of a 3rd or 4th century Roman building on the Knap passed on the Porthkerry walk Ely can also boast the remains of a Roman villa and whilst nothing is visible of the building the site is marked by the rectangular unmowed area in the middle of Trelai Park It was constructed in the first half of the 2nd Century AD and abandoned in the 4th Traces of the use of coal and iron making have been found St Mary s Church Caerau This church is mediaeval and was deconsecrated as recently as 1973 A masonry tunnel vault is an unusual feature of the South Porch and the saddleback tower is still in evidence Llanharan Walks The Beacons Round Barrows These are Bronze Age 2 000 1 000BC and the commanding position suggests they may have been the burial mounds of important people The name and situation makes it possible that they were subsequently used as beacon platforms Llanharan In the 1860s Llanharan had a church smithy corn mill malthouse the inn known as the Corner House and 28 thatched stone cottages Expansion came with the opening of several collieries in the late 19th early 20th centuries see below Harry Skevington came to Llanharan in the 1870s from Derbyshire Employed as a local labourer he also collected refuse in a horse and cart becoming known as Skevy the Scavenger Ann Thomas commonly known as Annie Baltic was as tough as they come She was a coal roundswoman starting work at 4am when she took her pony and cart to the goods yard Here she would fill the sacks with coal load them onto her cart and then deliver them to the surrounding villages often not finishing until late evening The picture shows her in her usual outfit long skirt and long sleeved blouse with Welsh shawl matched with boots and a man s cloth cap She was still working well into her seventies In the 1960s local blacksmith Tom Williams won all the major competitions in Britain including the coveted title of champion of champions Left Harry Skevington Right Ann Thomas Llanharan House This is visible to the right of the road as you approach Llanharan from Talbot Green It was built around 1750 by Rees Powell and later occupied by Richard Jenkins and the Blandy Jenkins family Its most distinguished visitor was King George II of Greece in 1923 Squire Jenkins who bought the house in 1806 made Llanharan a focus for hunting in South Wales buying 21 kennels of hounds They hunted fox hare and otter travelling as far west as Margam as far South as Dunraven and as far East as Machen Llanharan Collieries At the Southern end of the South Wales coalfield the area in which we are walking is littered with old shafts and tips for example at Meuros and Brynna Wood At Llanbad the remains are still visible This was the location of the South Rhondda and Rhondda Rider shafts both sunk in 1889 By 1914 there were 450 miners working here One seam was rich with fireclay and a large brickworks was also built here of which no trace remains and this included a stack 170 feet high The colliery and brickworks closed in 1927 In addition to the large winding house and other old buildings the original stables are still used for horses and the foundations and lower walls of the miners bath house can be seen by a gate on the left of the path opposite the winding house Ridgeway This is the probably the quietest that this ridgeway has been for many hundred years being used as a drovers road and a route for pilgrims travelling from Gloucester to Margam In the early twentieth century it would have seen large numbers of miners walking to and from the various local collieries The wording of the inscription on the rocks alongside the path in English God is Love is said to have been carved by a grateful father who took his young daughter to this spot for the purer air when she was suffering from an illness to her lungs and recovered Nonconformist preachers also used this location to harangue the passing colliers The ridgeway walk at this point is known as the Ffordd y Bryniau becoming the Ogwr Ridgeway Walk a little to the West St Peters Super Montem This atmospheric ruin claimed by some to be associated with King Arthur was still a lively location in the 18th century being used as a weekly market In 1731 some merchants were fined for selling ale ginger bread and cakes here on a Sunday The church was probably abandoned around 1813 when a new church was built at nearby Brynna Later stone was used was from this church in the restoration of the church at Brynna War Memorial Erected in the mid 1920s this was originally located in the Square but was regarded as a potential accident hazard and was moved in 1934 to the Welfare Ground After many decades of local protest he finally moved to his present location in 1960 Wind Farm There are 20 turbines generating 22 million Kilowatts annually which could power 6 000 homes The rotor diameter is 37 metres Llantrisant Walks Bull Ring This was so called because it was used for bull baiting whilst the fairs and markets took place on the village green The practice was disallowed in 1827 not because of the cruelty but because it attracted unruly crowds The original bull baiting stone is believed to be buried on Llantrisant Common Billy Wynt Hen Felyn Wynt the highest point of the town is the remains of a thirteenth century windmill and known locally as Billy Wynt By the early 19th century the tower was in ruins and in 1893 it was replaced as a folly Black Army The people of Llantrisant have been known locally as the Black Army for many hundreds of years The origins are unknown although J Barry Davies see Books section presents some interesting ideas on the topic One possibility is that local bowmen played an important role in the crossing of the Somme at Blanchetaque shortly before Crecy in 1346 Caerau Hill Fort This Iron Age fort is more correctly referred to as Rhiw Saeson Caerau Hillfort and not to be confused with the Caerau Hill Fort on the outskirts of Cardiff It is one of the largest hillforts in Glamorgan and is surrounded by a double bank and ditch except on the South side The Church of St Illtyd St Wonno and St Dyfodwg There is evidence of pre Norman settlement in an inscribed cross dated loosely to the 7th to 9th Century but the current structure has Norman origins which can be seen in the South door and the font The Tudor Tower dates from about 1490 and had 6 bells which were re cast in 1718 and a further two bells added in 1926 The East window is the work of Morris Burne Jones 1873 and most of the current appearance of the church dates from the same period the work of J Prichard Llantrisant Castle This was possibly started as 12th Century ring work but the stone castle was built by Richard de Clare between 1246 and 1252 It was sacked by Owain Glyndwr in 1404 The Raven tower which is visible is of Pennant Sandstone which was part of a cylindrical tower that formed a segment of a circular keep Llantrisant Town The ancient name for Llantrisant was Llangawdraf founded in honour of Cawdraf When translated Llantrisant means the church of the 3 Saints namely St Illtyd St Tyfodwg and St Gwynno The earliest historical reference mentioning the town of Llantrisant is 1246 It was granted its first charter in 1346 and it still has the ancient Court Leet which originated in the 13th Century but is now a charitable trust with few powers The ceremony of Beating the Bounds is still held once every seven years and is usually carried out before Ascension day In 1968 the Royal Mint was built close to the town and by 1976 all production had moved there from Tower Hill in London Edward II was captured nearby allegedly at Pantybrad following the invasion by his wife Queen Isabella At Rhiwsaeson passed on Walk 2 a battle took place in 873 between the Saxons and the Danes William Price Dr William Price 1800 to 1893 practised as a doctor and was well known as a physican and surgeon He claimed to be an arch druid and was closely involved with the Chartists He advocated free love and at the ripe old age of 83 took Gwenllian Llewelyn as a common law wife and fathered two children He was discovered by the townspeople attempting to cremate the body of his young son Jesus Christ Price and was tried at Cardiff but acquitted and charged a nominal farthing in costs When he died he was publicly cremated with 5 000 6 000 people in attendance This was claimed to be the first public cremation in modern times Margam walks Bodvoc Stone The Bodvoc stone seen on the walk is not the original which can be seen in the Margam Stones museum Another copy can be seen in the visitor centre at Afan Argoed Country Park A christian memorial stone with a vertical Latin inscription in four lines It stood originally on Margam mountain set into one of a line of four prehistoric barrows no doubt regarded as the graves of the ancient owners of the land thus legitimising the claim of Bodvoc and his family This is the oldest recorded Welsh family history It commemorates four generations of a family possibly local rulers though omitting to name Bodvoc s father who may not have ruled The inscription reads BODVOCI HIC IACIT The stone of Bodvoc Here he lies FILIUS CATOTIGIRNI Son of Cattegern PRONEPUS ETERNALI Great grandson of Eternalis VEDOMAVI Vedomavus Apart from Eternalis Latin and possibly Christian for eternity the family names are Celtic Cattegern means Lord of Battle and Bodvoc shares his name with a Pre Roman king of the Dobunni in modern Gloucestershire Date late 6th or early 7th centuries Information board in Margam Stones museum Brombil Valley There was a colliery in this valley which opened between 1777 and 1780 and closed in 1880 Originally the coal was transported in carts to Taibach Local people have a story that the ruined houses that you pass belonged to two sisters They made an arrangement that if either needed help they would hang a sheet out of the window During or after the second World War when German POWs were being held in a nearby camp there was a breakout and several prisoners escaped One of the sisters opened the door to find someone claiming to be a Polish airman She invited him in and allowed him to stay the night but was not fooled First thing in the morning the police were at the door to arrest the escaped prisoner having been alerted by the other sister who had seen the white sheet fluttering from the window For more on the nearby POW camp with its history and many photos click here Graig Fawr This is one of the ancient woods of Wales and is one of 7 being restored by the Woodland Trust Wales Coed Cadw in a project part financed by the European Union Ancient woods are those where there has been continuous woodland cover since at least 1600 Rhododendrons are being cleared paths upgraded and routes waymarked Cwmwernderi Reservoir Opened in 1902 to supply the Port Talbot area this has an earthdam with puddled clay construction A capacity of 45 million gallons or 205 000 cubic metres and water surface of 7 acres it takes water from the surrounding catchment area of 540 acres One inch of rainfall on the catchment area equates to 12 15 million gallons Hen Egwlys This simply means old church but the ruin is also known as Capel Mair a chapel dedicated to the Virgin Mary as were all Cistercian Abbeys It is 15th Century and was either used by the monks as a private oratory or was used by the lay people for worship The Cistercians did not allow their churches to be used by parishioners but they often built small chapels near the abbey for their use The woodland that you walk through below the chapel on the final part of the walk is Graig Fawr one of seven ancient woodlands in Wales being restored in a Woodland Trust project partly financed by the European Union Margam Abbey The evidence of the Celtic wheel crosses suggests there could have been a Celtic Christian church here before the Normans but in 1147 Robert Earl of Gloucester granted an extensive area of land between the rivers Kenfig and Afan to the French Abbey of Clairvaux The white robed monks of the Cistercian order built the abbey over about 40 years and this prospered both commercially and culturally Many charters and manuscripts came from its scriptorium including the British Museum s copy of the Domesday Book Later the abbey suffered during various Welsh uprisings such as that led by Owen Glyndwr and there were only 9 monks left when Henry VIII finally dissolved the monastery in 1537 This diagram shows the original buildings of which various ruins remain Layout of Margam Abbey as it was Not a single Cistercian church survived the Dissolution intact although sections of three of them have been retained for parochial worship Holme Cultram Abbey Dore and Margam In the 19th Century the owner Thomas Mansel Talbot made extensive alterations particularly to the exterior with its twin Italianate campaniles The church contains many points of interest including stained glass windows by William Morris a statue of the Virgin and Child by Joseph Cribb and an illuminated Litany Margam Castle Although the old house had been demolished by 1793 it was not until the late 1820s early 1830s that work on the new house began The architect was Thomas Hopper who also did commissions at Carlton House Danbury Park Penrhyn Castle St Mary s hospital Paddington and the Carlton Club The owner at the time was Christopher Rice Mansel Talbot and he was influenced by Lacock Abbey ancestral home of the Talbots and residence of his cousin W H Fox Talbot and Melbury House in Dorset the seat of his mother s family Lacock also involved the assimilation of old abbey buildings The style of Margam was to be Tudor Gothic and Hopper was encouraged to let his imagination run free with the towers turrets and battlements This picture gives some idea of the grandeur of the house Picture of the Staircase Hall taken by Thomas Franklin in 1891 Unfortunately the house declined and in the Second World War troops were billeted at Margam The house was largely stripped of its contents and in 1977 a major fire destroyed many of the timbers and the roof It is currently in the ownership of Neath Port Talbot Borough Council and an ongoing restoration programme has led to the re roofing of the South and West wings and other projects A full account of the history of the house is given in John Vivian Hughes s Margam Castle see Books section The earliest Welsh photograph known is a daguerreotype by Calvert Jones of Margam Castle taken on 9th March 1841 Margam Geology The walks cover a geological divide between the low lying parkland of shales gravel deposits and boulder clay and the upland moor and forest which is Lower Pennant Sandstone and part of the South Wales coalfield including the No 2 Rhondda and No 3 Rhondda veins As you walk up a valley on Walk 1 the stream to your left on the valley bottom is Cwm Philip you are heading up a valley glacier with Pleistocene deposits From the Pulpit you are on a sandstone escarpment that forms the southern edge of the South Wales coalfield Not far from here is the monks mine The monks of early Britain were particularly adept at coal mining and this mine took coal from the Rock Fach seam In order to get the coal out the monks would dam the mine so that the mine water flooded to a level sufficient to float a boat loaded with coal to the entrance with men pulling on ropes Also on the plain below are hummocky ridges which are formed of glacial rock sand and gravel The gravel has been extracted over the years and used for various purposes on the Margam estate From Geology trail leaflet produced by Margam Park Margam Old House After the Dissolution 1537 much of the monastery lands and buildings were acquired by Sir Rice Mansel whose main residence had been at Oxwich Successive generations including Barons and Lords added to and altered the monastic domestic buildings and a good idea of the appearance of the house is given by two topographical paintings which belong to Penrice House The artist is unknown and the date estimated as late 17th early 18th Century North view of the old house This picture is an extract from the original painting which shows a view stretching up towards Kenfig sands Details of the old monastic buildings can be seen and to the left there are deer in the deer park The building was finally

    Original URL path: http://www.glamorganwalks.com/local_features_mid.htm (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive


  • LF Mid
    Church The presence of old Celtic slabs suggest that this was an ecclesiastical site at least as early as the 9th Century The font is probably 14th century and the walls of the nave south porch and chancel are mediaeval although much else was altered in the 1893 restoration by Halliday and Anderson A notice indicates that the church is open for a couple of hours on Sunday afternoon in the Summer months More information and photos on this site Merthyr walks Cloggers in front of a pile of alder blocks Cloggers These men travelled around the country using makeshift tents of hide stretched over branches and cutting down alders to make the clogs Alder was used because it is resistant to water it was used for the piles under the Rialto in Venice It was also easy to carve After the tree had been felled the wood was cut into four sizes men s women s children s and young child s The rough blocks were seasoned in piles but then shaped with a sharp knife to match the wearer s foot From Merthyr Boat Boy by Clive Thomas Gill Foley and Josephine Jeremiah The Crawshays Whilst it may be fashionable to demonise the Crawshays as oppressors of the working classes a more balanced view will note their achievements as well as their faults Richard Crawshay 1739 1810 came from Yorkshire and worked with the then owner of Cyfarthfa ironworks Anthony Bacon to make it the largest in the world He initiated road building projects and was responsible for the Cardiff and Merthyr canal His son William Crawshay I 1764 1834 took over maintaining the success of the ironworks despite never living in Merthyr His son William Crawshay II 1788 1867 built Cyfarthfa Castle and was by the standards of the time an enlightened employer During economic slumps he refused to cut the pay of the workers and unlike most other major employers he never operated the truck system of pay whereby workers received their pay partly in tokens which had to be used to purchase goods at company owned shops at inflated prices Whilst linked to the hanging of Dic Penderyn who was accused of leading the 1831 uprising the evidence indicates that he paid for an appeal against the conviction And then there was Robert Thompson Crawshay 1812 1879 both popular and hated founder of the Cyfarthfa Brass Band keen on photography but contributing to the decline of the ironworks by his refusal to invest in the more efficient Bessemer converters At his request his gravestone bears the epitaph God Forgive Me and whilst often quoted as indicating regret over his treatment of his workers it more likely refers to bitter family divisions and his decision to disinherit his grandchildren Souce official guidebook Cyfarthfa The ironworks at Cyfarthfa were started in 1765 by Anthony Bacon and extended over the land visible from the steps of the current castle The two rivers the Taff Fechan and Taff Fawr

    Original URL path: http://www.glamorganwalks.com/lf_mid.htm (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Magazines
    be very good If you are interested in walking holidays there are many adverts at the back placed by hotels guest houses and travel companies specialising in walking holidays Claimed circulation is around 54 000 copies per month For subscriptions telephone 01858 438826 or Fax 01858 434958 TRAIL Similar to Country Walking but the walks section is called This Weekend The walks tend to be longer typically 7 to 15 miles often with a Bike ride and a scramble Whilst most of Britain is covered the bulk of the walks tend to be in the hillier areas For all telephone enquiries contact 01858 438826 and you can even e mail them victoria tebbs ecm emap com We shall be covering some of the walks featured in past and current issues on this site STRIDER If anything under 20 miles seems too wimpish consider joining LDWA the Long Distance Walkers Association their magazine is Strider The LDWA organises and gives publicity to longer walks throughout the UK Longer well anything up to 100 miles Individual membership is over 4 700 and there are over 850 family members LDWA can be contacted on 01276 65169 membership secretary or 01732 883705 general secretary

    Original URL path: http://www.glamorganwalks.com/magazines12.htm (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Leaflets
    COMMUNITY WALK 14 miles from Bryngarw to Llangeinor via Betws and Pontycymer largely followed by the Bryngarw Walk OLD INDUSTRIES NEW PARKS 5 5 mile circular walk from the railway station at Tondu and passing through Coytrahen and Bryngarw CORNELLY WALK 3 miles around South Cornelly NOTTAGE CIRCULAR WALK 2 5 miles of circular walking around Nottage NOTTAGE AND SKER POINT CIRCULAR WALK 6 miles along the coast to Sker than back cross country Also produced in the Bridgend area are some walks currently available and covering the Garw Valley area GARW VALLEY WALK 1 A circular walk starting at Blaengarw 7 miles BRYNGARW CIRCULAR WALK Just 2 5 miles this circular walk starts at Bryngarw Country Park Walks leaflets for the Bridgend area Route 1 3 mile route around South and North Cornelly Route 2 3 mile walk from North Cornelly out to Sker House Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales The WTSWW have produced some leaflets covering their nature reserves Brynna Woods and Llanharan Marsh 2 short circular walks one half a mile the other a mile Garw Valley A series of leaflets for the Garw Valley with useful maps and local information Walk 1 7 miles from Blaegarw to Pontycymer and back Walk 2 5 miles to the west of Blaengarw Some walks in the Llynfi valley currently in print OS maps used in leaflets Walk 1 From Garth station to Measteg station then use rail to get back to start point 5 miles Walk 2 Another route from Garth station to Maesteg station this one also 5 miles You can combine 1 and 2 to make a good circular walk of 10 miles Walk 3 This takes a similar route to Walk 2 but starts at Maesteg station and is slightly longer getting you back to Garth station in 7 miles Combine this with 1 for a 12 miler although you will need to follow one of the two routes backwards Walk 4 5 mile linear from Maesteg Station to Caerau then return by bus W Walk 5 5 miles linear walk from Maesteg Station with return option by bus Leaflets produced by the Merthyr Tydfil Groundwork Trust Morlais Heritage Trail 3 mile trail including old tramways and railroads Merthyr Heritage Trails A series of 10 historical walk leaflets in and around Merthyr Tydfil covering Morlais Vaynor Merthyr Tydfil Abercanaid Pentrebach Troedyrhiw Bedlinog Quakers Yard Trelewis Treharris Dowlais Cefn Coed y Cymmer Cyfarthfa The pack costs around 1 and can be obtained from the Information Centre in Cyfarthfa Castle Leaflets produced by Mid Glamorgan County Council Probably out of print Blaenrhondda Waterfalls Walk No 1 in series A 2 mile walk between Treherbert and Hirwaun Caerphilly Mountain Project leaflets Probably out of print Machen Forge Trail rural walk covering old industrial area of Machen tramways coal iron foundries 6 walks in the Caerphilly area Produced by the Council covering the Darran Valley Pen y Fan pond Twmbarlwm Caerphilly Rudry Sirhowy Valley Parc Penallta Can also

    Original URL path: http://www.glamorganwalks.com/leaflets10.htm (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Gower Coast Data
    of them including Llanrhidian Cheriton Llanmadoc Rhossili Port Eynon and Oxwich It is possible to follow a route that visits all 15 churches using an outline map in the leaflet in conjunction with an OS map Links Other websites with information on Gower http www gowersociety welshnet co uk http www explore gower co uk http www welshwales co uk gower peninsular htm This site has photos of a walk between Llanrhidian and Weobley castle The geology of Gower Distance The total distance listed is just under 52 miles but the actual distance walked may vary slightly Following every headland will add some whereas cutting across the beaches at low tide will reduce the mileage Problem areas Most of the route is straightforward and fairly obvious but it is advisable to check on the tides as they will affect where or when you can or cannot go Low tides provide opportunities to walk further on the beach and from one beach to another particularly between Oxwich and Pennard Two points to look out for which are referred to in the text are The collapsed sea wall before you get to Cheriton which until it is repaired can be difficult to negotiate at high tide There is an alternative route a little way back down the path High Tor between Whiteford Sands and Broughton Bay projects into the sea at high tide albeit not for long necessitating either a short wait a scramble over the rocks or an alternative route inland via Cwm Ivy and Llanmadoc Always take an Ordnance Survey map in case you need to divert from the published route Transport Local bus services cover most of Gower Ring Traveline Cymru on 0870 608 2 608 for details of timetables and prices There are no trains on the main

    Original URL path: http://www.glamorganwalks.com/gower_coast_data.htm (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Lime Kilns
    to produce plant nutrients particularly on acidic soils This is not untypical of what you will often find This limekiln near Michaelston le Pit is almost invisible through the summer just beginning to appear as foliage dies back in Autumn The earliest limekilns were simple pit like structures becoming more substantial stone and brick constructions from the mediaeval period onwards Limekilns in Wales were mostly circular although some were square At the bottom of the kiln were arched openings used to feed the fire and allow oxygen to enter and from which the processed lime could be extracted Charcoal coal or wood was used as a fuel A fire was lit at the base and then alternate layers of limestone and fuel were introduced from the top For this reason they were often built into hillsides or the sides of natural depressions or they had a ramp constructed so that waggons could be hauled up and the material tipped down into the crucible Restored limekiln between Three Cliffs Bay and Oxwich on Gower at SS 52896 87985 Left view looking towards Oxwich Point Centre one of two entrances Right hole above kiln where the limestone was tipped in Once the temperature had reached about 900 centigrade the limestone or Calcium Carbonate would lose Carbon Dioxide to become Calcium Oxide or quicklime Quicklime is highly volatile and ships transporting it not infrequently caught fire if the quicklime came into contact with water In its raw state it would kill anything growing so farmers would leave piles of it in the corners of fields to take in water naturally This process was known as slaking and the slaked lime or Calcium Hydroxide could then be spread over the fields usually at a rate of around 4 tons per acre Left ruined limekiln in Fforest Fawr not far from Castell Coch Centre limekiln at Oxwich on Gower Right Oxwich limekiln from the top showing the hole where the limestone was added The coastal limekilns of which there are many in South Wales could often be seen from the sea becoming landmarks as they burned with a blue flame and giving off thick acrid yellow smoke By 1900 most of the limekilns had stopped working as the railways proved more efficient for transporting lime than coastal shipping and as guano appeared as an abundant alternative source of fertilizer Limekilns close to the old harbour on Barry Island The Aberthaw Limekiln The substantial building in the photo is on the shoreline near East Aberthaw and is passed on the Coast walk The Aberthaw Pebble Limekilns were opened on the 22nd December 1888 The building consisted originally of two vertical potdraw kilns with a capacity of 300 tons each and with a total output of 40 tons of burnt lime per day The main structure is of local limestone with firebricks lining the kilns To the right of the building as you face it was a tramway ramp which allowed pebbles measuring 3 4inches in diameter

    Original URL path: http://www.glamorganwalks.com/lime_kilns.htm (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Barns
    this barn the basic features are still visible with large entrance door and narrow slit windows Either side of the central area of the barn sometimes called the middlestead would be the storage areas where the corn would be kept until it was threshed Once the harvest was gathered in the barn would be sealed up until the threshing was done often sometime in the winter Threshing involves beating the corn with a flail so as to separate the grain from the stalks The grain would then be winnowed which involved tossing it in a draught the dust and the chaff would be blown to one side the grain dropping to the floor Another advantage of having two sets of doors front and back was that it helped to create a draught Below the doors which would be a foot or two off the ground so as to open clear of the manure in the farmyard would be some planks the width of the doorway which slot into grooves and could be lifted in and out This held back the threshed grain hence the word threshold It also helped to keep the pigs and poultry from getting in when the doors were open On the left double barn doors showing on this barn near Maes y Llech On the right a substantial barn door near Radyr Another feature of some barns is a series of holes visible in the walls The most common are air vents designed to allow air to circulate and prevent mould developing in the crops These were generally single holes although vertical slits are also very common The holes might be grouped in geometric patterns particularly on brick barns Occasionally you will see a larger hole up to 9 inches across and often either square or

    Original URL path: http://www.glamorganwalks.com/barns.htm (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Milestones and Boundary Markers
    indicates For the emperor Caesar Marcus Cassianus Latinius Postumus Augustus Other Roman milestones have been found at Melincryddan Aberafon and Port Talbot Aberdare Milepost in Aberdare Aberdare boasts one of the grandest milestones in South Wales two aspects of which are shown in the photo It is situated in the centre of the town close to the public library It was erected by the Aberdare Local Board of Health in 1860 and shows a variety of distances London 182¾ Cardiff 22¾ Merthyr 6½ Neath 9½ Brecon 23 miles It was executed by H Pritchard Contractor Aberdare A48 Milestones along the A48 running west from Cardiff As well as individual milestones there are some sequences which can be followed with many of the stones in place One of the best runs along the A48 west from Cardiff The milespost above and left is close to the Angel Hotel in the city of Cardiff and from there you will find examples as you travel west in Canton Ely Pyle and Margam They are all of similar style but with two different dates 1835 and 1841 note in many cases the date section is now below ground level The 1835 posts are on the section from Cardiff to Bridgend and the later ones to the west these also having minor style differences You can also see the odd anomaly The mileposts in Canton and on Ely bridge both have Cardiff as 2 miles distant although the distance to Cowbridge more logically changes by a mile The mile marker at the top of the page at Laleston is similar and was erected by the Bridgend Turnpike Trust Left A48 Margam to Pyle Centre A48 a mile nearer to Pyle Right St Fagans Museum These three from the same A 48 sequence raise some issues The first at the southern end of Margam Country park is partially concealed by undergrowth and in need of refurbishment The one in the centre a mile to the south east has simply been coated in white paint And on the right this milestone has ended up in the Welsh National History museum at St Fagans A470 Merthyr to Brecon There are several milestones through the Brecon Beacons to Merthyr The Merthyr to Brecon milestones feature prominently on the left of the road as you travel north They are of stone and some are quite substantial The 15 mile to Brecon milestone in the picture is almost as deep as it is wide It bears the date 1867 and features a surveyor s benchmark These benchmarks see also the A4059 examples below are not the standard Ordnance Survey marks which have a horizontal bar across the top of the arrow and whose surveys were not started in earnest until towards the end of the 19th century Middleton and Chadwick s Treatise on Surveying suggests that surveyors should use a different mark for example an arrow without the horizontal bar to distinguish their marks from the British Ordnance benchmark The likelihood here is that surveyors primarily surveying the line of the roadway added their marks on these convenient milestones B4242 Milestone near Resolven The OS map shows a sequence of milestones on the B4242 but most seem to have disappeared However at least one is in situ shown in the photo which is at Coed y Cymoedd near Resolven It is constructed from a large chunk of rock with a piece missing on the left hand side the right hand face indicates 7 in Roman numerals miles to Neath On the left hand side the lettering ont is visible which referred to Pont Nedd Fechan and the distance would have read 5 miles A4059 Hirwaun to Brecon There are several stone milestones on the A 4059 heading north from Hirwaun most of those still in place towards the northern end As with the A470 sequence the information is minimal but the examples here also show the surveyor s benchmark along with a metal stud which can be seen in the lower photograph Bridgend area Left milepost at Tyn y Garn Second left at Coytrahen Second right Llysworney Right on the Porthcawl road The mileposts around Bridgend are of cast iron construction with 3 facets Three show distances at the top to the nearest railway station The Tyn y Garn one reads Railway Station 2¼ miles Maesteg 7 miles Bridgend 2 miles On the right the milepost on the A 4106 to Porthcawl just south of the A48 exhibits an unusual distance 4 miles 1 F or furlong Bryn Milestone near Bryn This is the only milestone we have come across in Glamorgan which is not on a tarmac road It is situated on a trackway classified as a byway open to all traffic between Bryn and Pontrhydyfen just to the west of a place called Penhydd Fawr and at SS 80572 93031 As far as can be seen from the fading inscription it reads To Bridgend X11 miles Clearly although now passed mainly by walkers this would once have been an important route between Neath and Bridgend Gower Milestone just West of Upper Killay The Gower Peninsular has some surviving milestones the one to the West of Upper Killay showing the Latin Numeral V indicating Swansea 5 miles Old Toll House in the Welsh National History Museum On the side are displayed the different tolls charged For a general introduction to the subject try Milestones by Mervyn Benford Shire publications ISBN 0 7478 0526 1 which includes suggestions for further reading Boundary Markers Typical boundary stone from Anglesey showing the parishes of Llanfaes to the left of the vertical line and Beaumaris to the right On right a similar stone in Weston Bigwood near Portishead the CB referring to City of Bristol Boundary markers were used to indicate where the boundary of a particular geographical area lay and this might be a parish or similar administrative unit or a private estate The parish can mean either a religious administrative area or

    Original URL path: http://www.glamorganwalks.com/milestones_and_boundary_markers.htm (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive