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  • Twelve Stories: How Democracy Works Now | Participants
    5th 2010 PARTICIPANTS Doug Rivlin Doug took the job as Director of Communications at the National Immigration Forum shortly before we began filming the series in the summer of 2001 He had a unique perspective on the issues at hand probably both from his Masters Degree training at the Annenberg School for Communications at the Universoty of Pennsylvania and from his constant contact with reporters And he was always cracking us up which isn t such a great thing when you are trying to hold a camera steady but which often helped his colleagues through ups and downs â â During his nine years at the Forum Doug was responsible for helping reporters and the public understand the immigration issue and what is at stake in the comprehensive immigration reform debate Before taking on the immigration issue he had worked as a Senior Advisor to the Director of the Voice of America and was the Washington Director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania He began his career in advocacy and communications at the Children s Defense Fund and the Advocacy Institute Since leaving the Forum in October of 2009 spent time as a blogger and

    Original URL path: http://www.howdemocracyworksnow.com/participants/doug-rivlin (2016-04-27)
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  • Twelve Stories: How Democracy Works Now | Participants
    day of this series Over those six years we watched Frank and his gang evolve into a real force in the national debate The story of the 2007 bill and why it failed is still a sore subject for many in his field Frank and the old Forum have been at the center of that debate ever since These days Frank has founded a new organization of his own It s called America s Voice and he created it in 2008 to focus on communications and media as part of a renewed effort to win comprehensive immigration reform It seems that people aren t always sure what to make of Frank he is as he likes to say himself the white guy in the suit He looks every bit the Washington spin doctor and has a politician s social adaptability but then you see him talk about the issue in English or in Spanish and a glint of his idealistic rabble rousing heart always shines through When we began filming in 2001 we intended to do our very best to get this story as completely as possible We were extremely eager to film with Frank s opposition especially the formidable Dan Stein the director of F A I R Dan and Frank were constantly on TV together in those days paired by lucky news producers who could count on a great entertaining argument from two polished performers Our conversations began with Dan and we were pretty hopeful that we d at least be able to start with him We met a couple of times and finally went to lunch together But something was wrong Dan may have wanted to let go to let us in to tell his story too but in our guts we knew it wasn t going

    Original URL path: http://www.howdemocracyworksnow.com/participants/frank-sharry (2016-04-27)
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  • Twelve Stories: How Democracy Works Now | Participants
    colleagues joined him they supported President Bush s proposal to â œmatch willing workers with willing employers Just a few years later Rep Tancredo was running for President and many of his fellow Republican candidates had for the most part adopted his immigration platform It was a stunning transition from the afternoon in 2002 when he and his staff were joking around handicapping a vote on the Border Security Bill They said it was a long shot but if 100 Congressmen voted with them it would be considered a major coup for his Caucus In the end 137 Representatives voted with him in retrospect it stands out as a real turning point Congressman Tancredo was born in Denver he was elected to the Colorado House of Representatives in 1976 He was appointed by President Reagan to the Department of Education and elected to the US House of Representatives in 1998 Rep Tancredo was one of the first in the House to focus on the human rights crisis in Sudan and in a moment of Hill synergy cosponsored the Sudan Peace Act with Sen Sam Brownback He and Sen Brownback are polar opposites on immigration but for Rep Tancredo s first

    Original URL path: http://www.howdemocracyworksnow.com/participants/tom-tancredo (2016-04-27)
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  • Twelve Stories: How Democracy Works Now | Participants
    of a referendum on New Iowans Max is a bit of a gadfly with a strong anti authoritarian streak but he has been on the City Council before In 2001 he was hoping Mason City would give him a second chance While it didn t work out for Max that time he won a City Council seat in the next election and has been reelected ever since As an At

    Original URL path: http://www.howdemocracyworksnow.com/participants/max-weaver (2016-04-27)
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  • Twelve Stories: How Democracy Works Now | Story | Mountains and Clouds
    now the focus Their Border Security Bill must come before immigration reform but Senate action is halted by Appropriations Chairman Robert Byrd Kennedy s longest serving and most feared colleague When the White House proposes a small immigrant friendly provision be added to the stalled bill it complicates the delay and becomes the catalyst for the birth of a permanent powerful and organized national opposition to immigration reform Credits Shari

    Original URL path: http://www.howdemocracyworksnow.com/story/mountains-and-clouds (2016-04-27)
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  • Twelve Stories: How Democracy Works Now | About
    lobbyists from business and labor and advocates of all stripes just as President Bush was preparing to host President Vicente Fox of Mexico at the White House It looked as though a huge immigration overhaul would happen before the year was out and we d have a movie of a beautiful process where a good idea becomes law in less than a year But we d only been shooting a couple of weeks when the terrorist attacks of September 11th took place On that day our story like so many things changed forever We decided to keep filming if we could The tale we ended up finding took us into pretty unexpected places For the next six years we did our best just to follow the idea of the comprehensive immigration reform wherever it seemed to be happening Iowa Kansas California and Arizona as well as Capitol Hill And in following that trail the journey taught us more about how democracy does in fact work than we ever imagined there was to know So that s what we believe this series turned out to be twelve discrete films about several dozen fascinating people in all kinds of places each connected

    Original URL path: http://www.howdemocracyworksnow.com/about/2 (2016-04-27)
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  • Twelve Stories: How Democracy Works Now | About
    that big a hit anywhere else We needed something that would help audiences see that the films are about immigration policy sure that s the thread that keeps things focused But just as much or more the films are about the ways that people do have a voice in governing the country the ways that social change can be made to happen whatever the angle whatever the issue That was

    Original URL path: http://www.howdemocracyworksnow.com/about/3 (2016-04-27)
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  • Twelve Stories: How Democracy Works Now | Participants
    donors and anyone who walked in off the street to give the Senator a piece of their mind Of the hundreds of calls a Senate office receives in a given day a good number are from people just calling to tell the Senator how they feel about a certain issue More often than not those callers were upset about something an issue like immigration perhaps and a young staffer like Susie would listen to their point of view and pass the message on to the Senator That was the real shocker at first Senators really get all those messages It was like lifting a veil to realize that Senators and Congressmen really do listen It s just that the voices they hear are those of the people who are motivated enough to follow an issue and call them up We were finishing up our work with the Brownback office around mid 2003 After handling all of those callers and visitors with unflappable charm first as staff assistant and then as office manager Susie left Sen Brownback s office about the same time but Susie joined his family when she married the Senator s cousin and left Washington DC These days

    Original URL path: http://www.howdemocracyworksnow.com/participants/susie-powell-brownback (2016-04-27)
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