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  • Agile Open Southwest - Integrum
    Agile Conference Step up to the mic Cancel reply Your email address will not be published Comment Name Email Website Recent revolutions Take the first step towards greatness and hire a coach today Send us your questions comments hopes and

    Original URL path: http://integrumtech.com/2012/10/agile-conference-open-southwest/screen_shot_2012-10-02_at_1-56-28_pm/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Episode #81 - Spike Stories, Estimating Before Planning and Blocked Stories - Integrum
    to develop some feature and there s a library that Mike did 90 percent of it for us We re afraid to commit to it because it could take two days or it could take one hour depending on the availability of that library or not I could see that as being a really good case for We re just going to commit to because we know at most it s going to take two days It s probably only going to take an hour because a library exists or it probably exists or whatever But at least you can commit to it Now do you leave that extra do you commit to the maximum amount of time it would take so you could potentially be leaving almost two days worth of work on the table that you re not committing to Clayton If you change the scenario up a bit and we say that you are doing a planning poker game and you have this stack of stories that are loosely defined You re not talking about the details of the stories to the acceptance criteria and anything like that but some stories come up and they sound really scary How often do you just spike them versus maybe giving them a larger estimate What do you do Jade I ve been faced with that I ve worked with a team that had to deal with that What we ended up doing was breaking that unknown down into some still large but smaller pieces We have this huge thing that we just can t estimate We have no idea how to do it Well could we talk about things that we could estimate and could understand and simplify the equation We ended up with some pretty large loose estimates on the things that were pretty big unknowns but it wasn t that we could not estimate it at all Clayton How do you know when you are spending too much time estimating and breaking things down just for the sake of getting that estimate versus just trying to take the work in or Roy Are you suggesting taking the work in without estimating at all Clayton I m saying is it worth it if you have some story that everyone on the team says or maybe there s one really outspoken person and they want to spike this because they ve never I ll go back to the API example they ve never worked with a third party API so there is no way they can size it because it could be the most complex thing in the world so they want to spike it Is it worth the time to go through and break the story down so that it can be sized better or it to have a whole separate spike story to research the API Are you wasting your time giving an estimate at that point Roy It depends on how quickly you need to get it done If you need to get it done this iteration then the only way to reasonably do that is to break it down into estimatable chunks that you can be as a team confident that you can complete if before the sprint is done If the product owner determines that this needs to get done this week or as soon as possible it s a top priority story even if it takes three weeks I still need it done as soon as possible then you re going to have to break it down and apply some estimates to it Clayton If research stories and spikes are smells how often should a team be using them Roy I don t know In the teams it s something like it will come up only like once every other month or so In my experience it s not that common for a spike to pop up Clayton If it does come more frequently what does that signal What could you learn from that Roy That s probably because you re not breaking stories down far enough to begin with for pulling it into the sprint Jade Yeah they re either way too large or your team is incredibly inexperienced that could happen Roy Or your team is just really worried that they re going to be held responsible for their stories They ve been burnt in the past by product owners that really pressure them into pulling stories in or pressure them and yell at them afterwards if they don t crosstalk Clayton They re fearful for some reason Roy I could see that yeah Clayton OK Roy It s like I don t want to commit to anything because I don t want to be kept to this or I don t trust the rest of my team to actually do it Jade Another thing I could be signaling is that you re missing a skill on your team Maybe there s a team member that you need to have that has the necessary experience or qualifications There might be something that really they just don t know how to do If for a bunch of developers and we need to illustrate something Maybe we just can t do it That would be another indication that we re missing it a critical person on our team Clayton We talked a little bit about estimates but there are a lot of things out there that are doing story point estimating basically that s part of the planning process Does that seem like a reasonable thing to do What are some downsides to that maybe Roy I don t know I ve been guilty of being on a team where we do that It feels reasonable at the time but I can t really name any benefits we get out of it I don t know Maybe it s like double ledger bookkeeping that we are confident that our tasking matches up to

    Original URL path: http://integrumtech.com/2012/09/episode-81-spike-stories-estimating-before-planning-and-blocked-stories/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Episode #82 - Implementing Agile with Peg Haustetter - Integrum
    allow They don t really understand the documentation They still require tons of documentation tons of certain types of testing depending on what the product is and then what sector that you re working in I was working in the medical indecipherable 06 11 sector Obviously there s a lot of regulations a lot of paperwork a lot of checklists You still have to do a lot of those types of documentation while your development team is developing in the Agile methodology but you still have to support all of the traditional indecipherable 06 35 In some of those cases in my case specifically the PM had to produce more documentation than my team probably wrote in code in some of those projects I think it depends on the organization and its will to let go of some of that The regulations that drive why we do things indecipherable 07 02 piece of software I think it s learning and I think it s learning all the way around It s not just for the companies but if they re regulated it s for the regulators They have to understand They need to look back and read all those documents again and see if there is a more streamlined approach Clayton Do you have any opinions on starting Agile at the team level and then growing it from the team level up to the organization level Or do you feel that starting at the organization level and trying to get the higher ups thinking in more Agile mindset is better Do you have any opinion on that or maybe you re still trying those things Peg I ve had more indecipherable 07 57 both the opposite ways The medical device company I worked at we were doing it at an organizational level It came from the top down and we happened to be the first project but they were pushing it across the organization I think it was six indecipherable 08 20 everybody was on board There was lots of training People went to all of the training the displays they went to indecipherable 08 36 reviews and things like that so they got engaged Currently I m at a client that first they were trying it more on a project by project basis doing an evaluation to see if that project fit into that mold That was a slow burn Just a few people would try to do it Now they indecipherable 09 05 organization I think that s more successful because when the management is on board with it then everybody gets the right communications and training so that they can move forward with it Clayton One thing that we ve found is that the organizational culture seems to play a very big role I was curious if you ve also noticed that or if you have any techniques or ways that you ve tried to guide the organization culturally Maybe they re used to this waterfall or

    Original URL path: http://integrumtech.com/2012/10/episode-82-implementing-agile-with-peg-haustetter/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Episode #136 - Simple - Integrum
    too We have to show them Why What if we just showed X What if X is enough That is all that feature needs why do we need the Because those other things exist so we have to show them There s very much this because we can we should mentality Derek Another thing we see in our work is that people have an aversion or misunderstanding of iterative development It s like if we don t do this now we re Jade You mean incremental development Derek Yeah If we don t do this now we re never going to do it If you guys don t plan every single thing that we think we know then we re totally screwed You guys are going to forget it To be fair I bet you there s a lot of product people out there who have teams that maybe aren t the most reliable and don t deliver what they say they re going to deliver and all those things When someone were to come in and say Hey we re going to do some really simple thing and ship it real soon it s like Yeah I don t believe you Like I m not going to take that risk Clayton To me it sounds like there s a little bit of the 85 15 rule where you can deliver 85 percent of the value with 15 percent of the effort Then you spend the other 85 percent of your time delivering the last 15 percent of the value I have worked with different product people designers and architects in the past where they want to get all 100 percent because they know that if you spend 15 percent of the effort now to deliver 85 percent of the value you re never going to spend the other 85 percent to deliver the last 15 percent Which may be a really awesome business decision but you ll never be 100 percent as good as it could be Roy Some of it is building off Clayton s response there is there are a lot of teams where if you say OK fine let s just do X You say OK let s do Y OK let s do Z Then you say OK let s do A Then they re like We re going to have to re evaluate the whole thing If you would have told us up front that we had to do A we would have totally built this in a different way Now that you want A we just have to throw away the last six months worth of work and start all over and if only you would ve told us Once they get trained for that it becomes if I know anything I must disclose it now and tell you that you have to build it into the app because if I disclose it later you may come back and tell me Oh man we have to throw everything out and start again Clayton By disclosing everything up front and insisting that it all gets done the product owner is really trying to maximize his choice later on down the road His ability to choose later on Roy They re trying to mitigate their risk I believe If they disclose all that and say we need to do all of that then they think they re mitigating the risk of somebody coming back later and saying Oh we can t do that because you didn t tell us In reality what they do is increase their risk exponentially because they make it so it becomes almost impossible to deliver what they re asking for Jade The cognitive load becomes much more to deal with and grok all of those additional features when they re not needed Derek It sounds to me like then you re going to try to build a system that s overly architected just in case you have to build any of the number of features you re told you have to support Roy One thing recently that clarified this a bit more for me was that we had a situation where we wanted to deliver some features that would have been nice to have a database Having a database was a non trivial thing so we used the file system We had a table with a row and a column in it That s all there was Derek A folder with files in it Roy Yeah We had a folder with files That was sufficiently complex for what we wanted to do I think some people hear that and they think What are you f ing crazy You can t use the file system laughter Roy Use a database that s crazy What we understood was right now for what we re trying to do for this little slice that s what we need right now We acknowledged that that is not a long term solution but it s going to be as long term as it needs to be for what we want to do with it Jade It was very simple to replace Roy Exactly Derek I think where this started to come and play for me was when we started to cross the chasm so to speak in doing a lot more mobile development So things that we thought were pretty trick and pretty sleek and pretty simple and pretty small started to fall down really quick when a customer would say hey by the way I need an android version or an iPhone version of this and I was like oh shit like dude like how in the man And so when it got to the point like OK let s make everything like API and we ll have the front end consumed of the web version consume that API and hey now we can have the iPhone version Jade Anything can use this API Derek

    Original URL path: http://integrumtech.com/2014/05/episode-136-simple/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Gangplank Chandler - Integrum
    up to the mic Cancel reply Your email address will not be published Comment Name Email Website Recent revolutions Take the first step towards greatness and hire a coach today Send us your questions comments hopes and dreams using this

    Original URL path: http://integrumtech.com/gangplank/gangplank-interior-dark/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Episode #07 - Everything You Wanted to Know About Pairing On a SCRUM Team - Integrum
    do I m a really good developer I don t want to pair with people that aren t very good because it slows me down One thing that you can do to improve those people on your team that may be more junior or don t have your level of expertise which you probably don t have any but you think you do But those people to train them or to help them out would be to do the distant passenger A lot of times I see that when people are in that situation pairing the person that s the more senior person will be micromanaging and driving and basically telling them dictating what to type You should write this method You should return it this way You should use the turner in blah blah blah If you talk at a higher level and say Well we want this model to be able to we want this instance of this object to build or respond to this method I want it to return a hash of these things When you speak at a high level like that and then you let the person go do the implementation Whether or not you re doing TDD even but let the person do the implementation and then maybe set aside some time at the end to do some kind of code review of like OK see how you did that You solved the problem Here s how I would have done it Have that discussion I think that s really helpful when you have a mix of skill levels Derek One of the things we see obviously operating on the Gangplank because it s pretty noisy in here We ve got a lot of people pairing in close proximity One of the things that a lot of people ask me is How can your guys be developing in such louder chaotic environment Maybe if you could explain a little bit about what it s like to Pair Program in an environment where you ve got lots of people Pair Programming in fairly close proximity and whether that positively or negatively affects productivity Clayton I ll give an example recently one of the guys on the team got everyone little Nerf guns that shoot darts For the past two weeks it s been like every day it s people shooting darts You could be sitting there trying to solve some complex problem and darts whizzing over your head That s the nature of the environment I found that a litmus test for me is if I feel like I m distracted or I hear people talking about I can t get anything done today I feel like that s not good pairing Or there s a problem with their pairing because I notice that when I feel like I m doing a good job and have an engaged pair and we re really hammering things out it s almost like all that stuff just doesn t matter anymore It s really easy to block it out probably more than people would think You ll notice that when people aren t pairing a lot of times people will put on headphones and try and get into the more traditional coder mentality of I m going to go into my own little world so I can t hear or see anything Don t bother me kind of thing When you re pairing you obviously can t do that When you re pairing you don t really need to do that as much in my opinion Derek What you re saying is you like to look deeply into the eyes of your pair and have some tantric pairing going on and nothing else in the world exists except for your pair Clayton No it helps if you have a little mirror so you can glance at each other s eyes every now and again You put that above the monitor and you re good to go Derek I think that s something interesting One of the things that I ve seen people talk about are some different pairing techniques in the way of physically setting up how you are pairing whether that be some face to face pairing some potentially pairing without even a laptop or a machine in front of you to solve the problem Then to go to actually pair to implement the problem Have you tried any of those things and if so what are some of your thoughts on those Clayton I tried the face to face pairing at one point in time That was quite a while ago I would say before I was I was trying things out I don t know I hadn t made my mind up really on pairing yet I found that to be distracting It seems like the face to face stuff would be good and maybe it just was the person I was pairing with but I found like it was more convenient to be looking up and away from what we were doing and doing a lot more conversational talking That was probably the down side to that Other than that as far as different pairing configurations one technique that I had to do working with someone this is easy to do when you re pairing People have a certain different degrees of personal space and that kind of thing I had noticed that every time we sat down at the desk this person would always sit in the middle and so it s like I found that towards the end of the day I would be pushed over to the side We got to a point where we drew some lines on the desk with some tape and we said OK here s our zone where we need to be and if we drift out of this zone then one of us is going to be uncomfortable because we can t see the

    Original URL path: http://integrumtech.com/2011/03/scrumcast-7-everything-you-wanted-to-know-about-pairing-on-a-scrum-team/ (2016-04-26)
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  • An Agile Teams Lessons Learned from Startup Weekend - Integrum
    Sunday and to go with the Craigslist Car Scraper At this point it was about 8pm and we found a room and got started We started out by doing a quick Agile Lift Off This process took us about 30 minutes Vision Allow vehicle buyers with less than 5 000 an efficient way to locate a new vehicle Values Fun experience Less BS Less time on Craigslist Best deals right away Working Agreements rotate pairs every hour ok to checkout hourly checkins deploy every hour no stories greater than 1 hour We then did a quick story workshop in about 30 minutes to generate a backlog of stories After creating the backlog we sorted it and started planning It quickly became apparent that at no stories larger than 1 hour that 1 hour sprints probably made sense When breaking down tasks we made our smallest time box 6 minutes or 0 1 hours Most tasks were either 1 or 2 We setup two clocks one to measure iteration time 1 hour and one to notify of time box 6 minute At the end of every sprint we would do a Core Protocol Checkin and then do a quick retrospective After the retrospective we would take a break and play some NFL Blitz Then right back into another planning generally about 10 minutes We worked from 8pm Midnight 4 hours on Friday and 8am 8pm on Saturday 12 hours for a total of 16 hours including time for breaks meals etc We had 3 sprints on Friday night and I believe 6 sprints on Saturday for a total of 9 hours of keyboard time This is what we produced http hooptie co What we learned we can still practice what we preach working agreements are important breaks and having fun increase

    Original URL path: http://integrumtech.com/2012/08/an-agile-teams-lessons-learned-startup-weekend/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Episode #74 - Lean Startup with Aaron Eden - Integrum
    that those small experiments you can leave your corporate branding off of them In our case at Intuit the legal team has actually been doing really great things They ve sort of given us rough guidelines that say hey if you re playing within this space as long as you re testing on less than a thousand customers or whatever it is I don t remember the exact number They basically say as long as you re within these guidelines go ahead and test away When you get beyond a certain scale then that s the point where you need to start getting legal approvals and that kind of stuff I think there s definitely some really positive ways to put some solid boundaries in place and support the teams in moving quickly while still keeping the corporate polish on things Derek I think you bring up a great point that I ve seen a number of really large companies do when they bring in lean startup One of the things they tend to do is they start to create innovation laps These laps are really targeted at a thousand pers Exactly what you said right there they re very boxed to be experiments not necessarily be shippable product with the brand flagship name on it everything else What I see is a problem with a lot of these teams when the experiments actually go right That the really struggle with how do they transition to turning them into real products Meaning they kind of use this lean startup piece to get rolling get moving but then they get a thousand people and everybody overwhelmingly says Yeah we want to see this Then it becomes How do I turn this over to a development team that s never seen it and they have to pick up the code base and the support staff has to support it and legal has to get involved and marketing has to approve all of these things It just gets pulled right back into that quagmire of it never hits the market because the corporate monster stops it in it s tracks Drew Sounds like in that case like you were talking about passing it off to a new development team and getting whole new people involved It sounds like that might be the wrong approach to take from the stand point that the guys who built it and are passionate about it and have seen what success it can bring they understand the vision It kind of sounds like those people are the ones that need to see it through Now I realize that this may add a disincentive or a reason to try to sabotage your own projects so that you can continue being on the fun innovation labs rather than being the old legacy guys but I guess I don t really know the right answer for it But it sounds like passing it off to completely new people doesn t sound

    Original URL path: http://integrumtech.com/2012/08/episode-74-lean-startup-with-aaron-eden/ (2016-04-26)
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