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  • Episode #134 - Cross Functional? - Integrum
    conversation on Facebook Subscribe to the podcast Make your mark Get involved with the Agile Weekly Podcast by volunteering to be a guest recommending a speaker submitting a question or suggesting a topic Step up to the mic Build up your toolkit Learn new tips and tricks for empowering your team and transforming your business See the blog Hungy for More Info Agile Weekly is a quick way to stay

    Original URL path: http://integrumtech.com/2014/03/episode-134-cross-functional/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Integrum Team To Speak at Desert Code Camp - Integrum
    Swedler AJAX Javascript Javascript 101 Drew LeSueur CoffeeScript Drew LeSueur Introduction to Node JS Drew LeSueur with Chris Matthieu of Tropo Mobile Making Android Development Less Painful Kyle Stewart Intro to Windows Phone 7 Development Chris Coneybeer Building the Desert Code Camp Windows Phone 7 App Chris Coneybeer Playing nice with other Android Apps Roy van de Water Agile Everyday Extreme Programming XP Clayton Lengel Zigich How to Manage Self Organizing Teams Jade Meskill Software Development Git Intro to Version Control Roy van de Water Ruby on Rails 101 Clayton Lengel Zigich Business Sales for Non Salespeople Chris Conrey Using LinkedIn for Personal and Business Gain Chris Conrey Managing Client Expectations Chris Conrey with Matt Brooks of DevFu Big Shop vs Small Shop Chris Conrey with Matt Brooks of Dev Fu PREVIOUS Episode 08 Done is Done NEXT Episode 09 Design in Agile Software Development One thought on Integrum Team To Speak at Desert Code Camp Pingback Desert Code Camp Grows Integrum Rocks It Integrum Step up to the mic Cancel reply Your email address will not be published Comment Name Email Website About the author Jade Meskill Chief Revolutionary Officer The new normal presents us with many extraordinary opportunities

    Original URL path: http://integrumtech.com/2011/03/integrum-team-to-speak-at-desert-code-camp/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Episode #71 - Managing Traditional Culture with Tom Mellor - Integrum
    into a company that was high performing market leader totally kicking ass going You know I really think we need some culture or some process changes around here Are we doing a disservice by companies that are seeking help by short selling them that Hey improve your teams and start there and that s a really great place to start Drew That might still be a great way to start though Tom This is a generalization and may be not supported actually by observation but I think there can be a tendency to go in naively If you come in and consult these companies companies inaudible 07 27 to feel that you have an answer Why would you be there To your point if I m doing well and taking inaudible 07 34 at the market and putting out inaudible 07 36 products I m probably not bringing people inaudible 07 40 improvement anyway But if I m trying to resurrect a company that at one time maybe didn t perform well or maybe got bit by complacency any number of those really bad things that can happen at companies then there is a propensity to reach out for a silver bullet Yet there is a hesitation on those companies to invest into thorough changes that will be required if they re actually going to recover or progress It s interesting because Jerry Weinberg has written for years that you can t manage change in the same way that companies think that they can manage products and manage people and do all that There s even a model called the ADKAR model that supposedly systematically and mechanistically structure your organization to manage change He and Virginia Satir work very closely together for years and the dynamics of the change are much more aligned to Virginia Satir s change model which there s some kind of foreign element that s introduced into a company that creates chaos over some period of time That s where support for change whether you introduce the agile practices or you re introducing different engineering practices however you want to characterize it there s got to be support in those organizations The organizations have to want to have that support and they got to reach out and bring that support in in the form of coaching or in the form of really good guidance Otherwise it s a waste of everyone s time if you re just going to give a lip service and you re not really going to invest in the change Clayton I m sure that you guys see a lot of people at your classes that have this problem Maybe they are coming for refreshers CSM or whatever They re wondering how they can either change or just manage traditional culture and facilitate agile What have you seen have been effective for those people To someone listening that s maybe in that same boat how would you recommend that they manage that

    Original URL path: http://integrumtech.com/2012/07/episode-71-managing-traditional-culture-with-tom-mellor/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Episode #76 - Managers and Developers Growing Apart with Gil Zilberfeld - Integrum
    time when we tried to implement a new practice Management needs to take the first step and give enough room to the developers to decide what s good for them In terms of practices XP practices are great code reviews pair programming any testing everything there is great but we need to first as managers to make the team the developer team feel they re empowered enough I don t like the empowered word really but they are empowered enough to pick practices not for short term long term and to keep practicing and make themselves better Without it the developers will just think that the managers have the new flavor of the week working for it They will wait for the winter changes to come about They won t really go into stuff They know it s going to last Clayton I know you ve got a lot of history and experience with testing unit testing specifically CV kind of stuff but in terms of maybe the bigger picture a lot of sprint teams or Scrum teams they will have a QA person maybe have an embedded QA sprint tester whatever they call it How does that person fit into that structure Most Scrum teams that I ve worked with that have developers and QAs as separate roles they do these mini Waterfall things where the developers do all the work and then the QA people do their work I m just curious what your take is on that How do you think those two roles can be cross functional How can the testers someone that has more of a QA background how do they fit into the Scrum team that s maybe doing TDD that has a very good testing culture on the development side but maybe not so much on the QA side Gil It s funny because I was something 10 years ago the product manager in another company Without knowing about Agile and roles within the Agile team I attached testers to develop in an organisation that there was separation before that I did that because it made sense The inaudible 10 03 as developers were doing a unit testing but it was automated We were doing some kind of manual unit testing Of course manual testing by the testers but putting them together actually they did talk a lot of things First they started talking to each other instead of just blaming each other for you found my bug or something like that They actually sat together testers and the developers on the developer s machine So instead of waiting for integration which obviously was painful without automation instead of that as the developers developed the screens and some logic behind it testers sat with them They saw what they re developing and they could redirect them if there was a need Now beforehand before we did that there was some notion that there shouldn t be any discussion between the testers and the

    Original URL path: http://integrumtech.com/2012/08/episode-76-managers-developers-growing-apart-gil-zilberfeld/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Episode #115 - Commitment Considered Harmful? - Integrum
    is truly committed and committed in everything they do they say Hey we re going to have we re going to write tests first We re going to make sure that our product owner is happy with the work that we re doing We re going to commit to all these things and we re going to commit to do what we say we re going to do You can t say We finished everything but it doesn t meet the product owner s requirements and it s not tested and it s not because at that point you don t have a commitment either Jade But technically it s done Derek I know Jade The way you said the phrase Do what you say you re going to do I think that was a big shift that we had an sp integrim of the concept It sounds so simple right Do you what you say you re going to do I think that s really to me is what commitment means I m going to say I m going to do something and then I m going to do it but that s not easy Derek No It s not easy and I think commitment isn t easy Like committed to do something is difficult right But it doesn t have to be this you know abusive tool Jade I think to me the thing that I really love about Agile when it s done really really well is it becomes the truth killer So if you can go around and say My team is so awesome I m so awesome and all this stuff and make all these promises and never ever fulfill them like you re just a lying piece of crap Who can trust you Whereas if you say Hey I can only do this really really small thing but I think a lot of developers have problems with this because when they say Oh yeah I can do this I do this and somebody says OK so you re committing to that and I m going to kind of hold you to that Let s talk about it at the end and then you can t do it The developer doesn t say Man maybe I think I m way full of myself and I should not commit to nearly as much less time next time I should commit to half of that because I didn t even get close Instead they say Well the problem was this and the problem was that Everybody else in the world was the problem and it wasn t me I think that s just if you re honest with yourself about wanting to improve and you really want feedback the only way you can do that is to measure yourself So if you re not saying I think I can do X and then going out and doing it and measuring can you do it how the hell can you improve Derek So we can go from the standpoint of commitment adds at least some level of stress to the Jade True it does Derek to the developer right Because now they are kind of freaking out about this promise that they made and trying to keep it But what positive benefit does a commitment actually get If I m a developer making a commitment what benefit do I get by other than stressing out about it Is that stressing out is that the benefit that I get That I get more accurate at estimating sounds I get more accurate at committing sounds great But getting better at committing if committing itself doesn t give me any value am I just getting better at something that doesn t matter Jade I think you can build some trust Or if you say you re going to do something and you do it and you repeat that multiple times you can build some trust that when you say you ll do something you ll do it I think it also is a discipline thing Having a commitment I think helps you be disciplined Discipline I think is a very difficult thing to have in software development A lot of teams lack that and I think that s just another mechanism that helps reinforce that Derek I think the other thing is commitment is a two way street It s not just the developer who s committed The idea is that I m saying I will do this if you don t bring in anything else to me to do during this period Jade Like the sp Schrum Derek Yeah I mean I think it s part of the whole contract So when people say Like we do Schrum but we don t do this and we don t do any of this stuff It s like Well how can you even live up to the basic premise of Schrum which was we re going to agree to do X Y Z you agree to leave us alone One of the things I ll add is any developer out there that thinks that estimates commitments everything else are horse crap come work for me and let s talk about how we pay you Is every week I ll decide what we pay you I m not going to tell you what you get paid until after you ve done the work and it s entirely negotiable up to me whether I think you deserve the money or not You may get money You many not get money and you re going to be happy about it That s what you do to every damn product owner you work with when you have no ability to say This is what you re getting They re spending money on you They are giving money to you to do a job If you don t do what you say you can do and you

    Original URL path: http://integrumtech.com/2013/07/episode-115/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Episode #107 - Is Agile Faster? - Integrum
    is still a very neglected part and most organizations are focused on output make sure the programmers are shipping and sending stuff But eventually you have to address that other end that says Are we working on the right thing How do you help the product owner and the infrastructure around that whole management of portfolio and feature ideas to pick the right ones that ll have the most impact Jade I ve met a lot of organizations who have an amazing tolerance for wasting everybody s time It just blows me away every time Derek There are some organizations that I ve been in they introduced me when I started there by saying Oh yes this project is really cool It only took three months of discovery I said OK so what did that produce They said Well here s this document I said Well where s the back log Well we don t have one yet That s going to take another month Roy Well wait until you see the product It s going to be sarcastically so cool and awesome in five years If I m trying to justify it to a superior I m trying to sell somebody on it what I m hearing is I can t really go We ve got to use Agile because it will make us faster and it will make us more efficient I m hearing Derek jokingly Use ComBomb for that Roy We need to use Agile so that our teams will tell us No when we want stupid things It totally makes sense but I feel like that s going to be difficult to sell Derek If I were to try to sell an executive who was on the fence on Agile I would start with a couple of things How engaged are your employees in your teams towards the work that they re doing If their answer is unenthusiastically Yeah I got a bunch of eight to five people They don t really care You re probably going to do a better job solving that problem if you really start to become Agile than you are going to solve the going faster problem You can come in and you can do Agile wrong and implement Agile As part of that you might get teams to go way faster but they might completely disengage and I like to call it iterating to nowhere Your velocity is just climbing like a beast but you re not shipping any software Or You re shipping software but nobody likes it Everybody thinks it s horrible It s not selling better You re not The big thing is I can tell what an executive is looking for by how they want to measure Agile If they want to measure Agile like I m doing Agile this year and I want 100 percent of my teams to be using Rally and have increased velocity That s how I ll know I m successful It s like You don t really care about agility right If it s My problem is we re only shipping our software every six months and I want to be able to give features to customers every week and get feedback I want to be able to have really high net promoter scores and have my customers love our product To me it s What are you trying to do by being Agile I think the thing that we ve done in this community that has been a travesty is we have sold Agile as more quality faster and better The problem is we did that because everybody wants that That is good to the bottom line Roy It s easy to sell Derek in some ways It s easy to sell and we can produce that fairly quick with XP and Scrum and ComBomb and these things We can see those things pretty quick The problem is that going faster without meaning without purpose and without collaborating with the customer doesn t mean crap Roy That s perhaps another good benefit too the using it to entice people If you believe in the principles that are in the Agile manifesto and you want to attract people then that might be like trying to create a culture that attracts more of it so you can get the people that you want on board Derek This would be a great witness test for me Those of you that are sitting in the audience if you think you re Agile and it takes you more than two minutes to deploy your software and more than two minutes to undeploy your software you are not Agile It s all about responding to change I don t know how many teams I talk to that say Oh yeah we re doing ComBomb We re doing Scrum We re doing whatever and we are totally Agile They have a slowly and dramatically 64 hour deployment process Jade You mean deployment sprint Derek Right I mean how on earth can you respond to change Jade Deployment epic Derek when it takes you 64 man hours to get something Can you imagine going to Walmart to buy a block of cheese and them going We ll check you out in 64 hours if you can just stand in line and wait there we ll gladly ring you up in 64 hours Jade They ve got to grow that cheese Alan Well 64 hours Jade Cheese tree Alan in some environments is very very fast by the way Jade Not Agile ones Alan Not Agile ones no The other part of this that we touched on earlier that I think we could address is the talk about collaboration and communication right Over time an Agile team I think does lose a significant amount of the overhead that it takes to collaborate and communicate and that can help make them work faster If you re spending less time

    Original URL path: http://integrumtech.com/2013/04/episode-107-is-agile-faster/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Episode #133 - Changing too fast or too slow - Integrum
    OK you want to do something that sounds totally radical I ll try that for a while because to them it s not the end state Jade What happens if we turn this scenario around and say we change as fast as the most aggressive person What happens then Roy All right now we re talking laughter Clayton I don t know Why does that appeal to you Roy Roy It goes fast Clayton For the sake of going fast Roy Well you get there faster Jade Do you Roy I don t know maybe you don t I got a feeling that that would make the majority of people extremely uncomfortable probably beyond whatever their limits are Jade Would they be completely dysfunctional at that point Roy I don t know They d either be completely dysfunctional or maybe just totally leave or even mentally check out and just not be able to cope Jade Just reject the reality that s happening around them Roy That s what s interesting If you took an individual that worked for some backwards organization and threw them into a completely different organization even if he didn t choose that I feel like that individual would adapt very quickly There would be some uncomfortableness but it would be relatively minor Now if you were to do the opposite case where you have one person going to an organization and radically changing that organization everybody has to change That is way more painful if you try to do that at speed Clayton I think going as fast as the most aggressive person I would say there s probably a good chance that you re going to throw the baby out with the bath water Jade It feels reckless to me Clayton Yeah exactly If I m doing it just for the thrill of speed I want to get to whatever the next state is in my opinion as fast as possible I think you probably risk losing people insights or whatever that would be beneficial to the whole group because you re trying to go so fast I would also say it s a two way street The person that wants to go super slow and be comfortable the Agile community is very good at trying to analyze that problem of why is this person wanting to go slow what are they afraid of Blah blah blah Then the people who want to go as fast as possible there s fears on that side too that we don t address I would say the people that want to go as fast as possible are probably not very common Roy They re probably afraid too They re afraid that the change that they want will never happen so if they don t go fast enough Clayton There s some reason that they want to go so fast Roy It would be like Speed where if they drop below 50 miles per hour the bus explodes Clayton I haven t seen that yet Roy laughter Jade We ll save you the trouble Clayton I m trying to go through Sandra Bullock s entire catalog laughter Clayton I think we probably ignore the fact that there are a lot of reasons why people want to go super fast I ve seen that in organizations where people get the bug to change something and they say Oh cool This is an opportunity to change everything For whatever reason they re unhappy with what the status quo is and they want to change everything I agree It seems reckless I m not sure where we re going but we re not here anymore Jade We re not stopping to find out Clayton Yeah exactly We re going as fast as we can Roy Doesn t that sound fun Jade Sometimes maybe Roy You don t know where you re going to end up that sounds like a great time Clayton Yeah I guess it depends where you end up Roy No it doesn t It s not about the destination It s about how you get there Clayton I would have a lot of fun going on some adventure but then if we ended up in the middle of nowhere I d be like Hmm The honeymoon s over I don t want to be in the middle of nowhere any more Jade Yeah I m the same Roy That makes you lame laughter Jade We have an interesting mix on our little group Derek s not here with us tonight but Roy and Derek are much more on the aggressive side I m definitely on the more conservative side I think you re there with me too Clayton Clayton I would say I m more concerned about I want to go somewhere I d go on an adventure as long as it s the one I want to go on Roy I m the exact opposite Your thing of I don t know where I m going to end up but if I end up in the middle of nowhere I m going to be upset that s every weekend for me and I m not upset Clayton Right that is true Jade Then we ve had some good experience in our past of changing rapidly trying new things doing things Why does it work for us Clayton There is something about the fact that we really actually believe in iterative approach to things beyond building software You had started out by saying we re OK with changing because we know that s not the end state It s just the next thing and it will help us change faster I think that s a big part of it Also the fact that we re willing to call a duck a duck and say Hey look we tried this thing and it failed That doesn t mean we re failures Maybe the actions we took or the outcome

    Original URL path: http://integrumtech.com/2014/02/episode-133-changing-fast-slow/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Episode #41 - Working with Proxy Users with Alan Dayley - Integrum
    wasn t able to meet with us and would have a subordinate meet with us I think it s Pretty much in all cases it ended up rather poorly where we either had a problem where the person that got delegated to be our proxy product owner either didn t know enough about the product to make his decisions or every time we bring something up in the planning meeting he d say Oh I don t know the answer to that I got to go back to the product owner and we get a response a week later which for us is a whole sprint or we d have the other example that Derek gave where they d go ahead and make a decision and then we find out three weeks or four weeks down the road when the actual product owner gets a chance to look at it that none of it is the way that he intended Roy van de Water I think following the money is a important lesson to learn here Who s really signing the check and making sure that they re involved in some way Especially that there is some feedback mechanism for that person to be able to let you know that if they have created a proxy or delegated some of that but that person is actually making correct informed decisions and if they re not there needs to be a retrospective or some time for reflection to help the real product owner understand that that person is telling the team to do the wrong things and that issue has to be has to be dealt with That s not the teams fault They don t know They are being told that this person fully represents me and is your product owner listen to them but if that person s not doing the right thing there needs to be some feedback mechanism between that proxy and the real product owner to address a lot of those concerns Derek Even when you have the real product owner being your product owner and you are not going through a proxy I ve been on multiple projects where the real product owner made bad decisions because they didn t get the product out the door fast enough and into users hands They made all these assumptions about what the requirements were based off what they thought users would like whereas if they had released early like within a month rather than six months they may have saved themselves five months of development time realizing that the user had no interest in the product or had a significant amount of interest in one feature but none of the others or didn t care about certain defects or whatever the case was I think even if you have the actual product owner at the development team you should push the product owner to release his product as early as possible I don t know who said it but I really like to quote that you should be embarrassed about your first release of whatever product that you are working on Jade laughs How does that contrast with you only have one chance to make a first impression Derek That s a good question I don t know I think that in the past that was probably more true than it is today You are seeing with I ve seen multiple times now where there are products that are coming out where they are almost offering data access to users They get to use it for free or at a discounted rate You see that with Google with Gmail when that first came out You see it with games every once in a while too like Minecraft is a really good example of this Where users today and especially in my generation are OK with having an incomplete product they d rather have an incomplete product for less or even for the same price but earlier on Alan You little kids Derek than have a fully developed product that s perfect Alan The expectation is being set that you are an early access user That this is not the final product right That s a clear thing You are not just releasing the first release crosstalk Derek Sure Alan Well that s that was crappy so let s try again Derek Absolutely That should follow with whoever is releasing that product should do that I totally agree with that expectation is to be set You can t just release and say This is awesome it s totally finished We had this exact example with Migo here right Where they released this product and they re like We ve got this totally awesome finished product Everybody was all excited go home and play with it and found out that it was still completely in development stage Which most of the people here would have been completely fine with but it was presented as a finished product and that s what totally killed it for everybody I think I don t want to divert too much here but I think that one of the things we see is that A fundamental shift that has happened is we don t do box software anymore The concept of version here is gone The best example of this right now today is Facebook I mean Facebook is probably different every single time you log in to it It s got new functionalities shipping nearly every single day When features come on they re not fully baked They re not fully where they need to be but people s expectations are It s OK because it s going to continue to improve or continue to change It s not the world where you walked into egghead or best buy or 2999 and you got version 1 0 and it was going to be another year before you get the next version People are

    Original URL path: http://integrumtech.com/2012/01/scrumcast-41-working-with-proxy-users-with-alan-daley/ (2016-04-26)
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