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  • Matthew Shipp                
    of the main reasons people haven t taken an interest in the avant garde Shipp is doing more than just riding the next wave in jazz The 37 year old pianist is one of those musicians causing earthquakes that create the tidal wave He was part of the revolution that invaded rock record labels in the mid 90s His name began to surface as he frequently appeared as a sideman on various records on the Homestead label Shipp also issued a record on the Austin Texas punk and hardcore label Rise Records and had three albums on Henry Rollins s label 2 13 CD and saw his trio s debut released on the Rollins and Rick Rubin project Infinite Zero Records Over the past 10 years Shipp has stepped out to be the most important and creative pianist playing today His contributions to records by heavyweight saxophonists Roscoe Mitchell David S Ware and guitarist Joe Morris are the reason such albums have received such heralded critical review Shipp s peerless style is influenced by Cecil Taylor Bill Evans and Thelonious Monk but never stuck into mimicking other players His percussive style is reminiscent of Taylor s eighty eight drums theory but is still melodic and decorative like Monk or Evans The result is an iconoclastic mode that complements the many musicians and situations Shipp plays in Various recording dates have allowed Shipp to showcase his ability to create with different groups His duo records with saxophone bass or guitar accompaniment are among his finest Shipp has also had the opportunity to release a pair of solo albums Shipp s main group started as a trio with drummer Whit Dickey and bassist of the century William Parker The group then expanded to a quartet including Mat Manieri on violin The departure

    Original URL path: http://www.matthewshipp.com/press/2-diamond/diamondback.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Matthew Shipp                
    So in a sense you re almost a token They know you re supposed to be important in a certain way and they need some value of coolness up there It s a very strange thing The major benefit is that you can get the album anywhere you can walk into the mall and find the album But it s definitely a very tricky game With the independent label you have a lot more basic care for the artist and the music in general It s an uphill battle you re dealing with limited distribution limited promotional budgets but the overall feel of how the thing s done usually rings a little more true Thirsty Ear and I happen to be friends and they like me a lot and have really created a good environment for me to do that album and for it to get out there and it s felt like home That s an important thing to make the recording artist feel comfortable They ve cared about the music and they ve cared about me It s been a good experience for all of us It just feels a lot better than being a number at a major label or just caught in the machine Somehow it gets transmitted to people that there s care that there s not just a corporate number crunching thing WOOVE How do you feel about performing live compared to performing in the studio Shipp They re different things and I just approach them each differently They both are their own space time continuums and they both have to be approached for what they are I don t put one above the other I mean records are very important for musicians to have as documents Then live performances are very important things to get across who you are So I approach them both separately and try to tap into the integrity of what both of the processes are WOOVE What are some more memorable experiences you ve had playing live Shipp Memorable WOOVE Yeah Shipp Like in a good or bad way WOOVE Either One I guess I d rather hear about the good but the bad is always there Shipp Well I think the thing about live performances is that after you re out there long enough any performer who s been on the road for like a decade or more has a whole university of experiences you tend talk about There s all kinds of characters you meet and all kinds of situations you deal with You definitely see a whole slice of what humans are capable of good or bad This is a really funny experience Once with the David S Ware Quartet we were playing in Italy and we had a day off and we got booked for this disco We thought we had somehow really got across what we were about but it was seriously a gig in a disco it was a bunch of teenagers there And the whole time we were playing we had these teenagers just sitting in the corners making out And here we are just doing what we do on stage It was really funny I mean they were really polite and applauded at the end of the number It was kind of like we were background music for these teenagers making out You know it s just tough That was a very unusual situation for a band of that sort to be in WOOVE That would be pretty wild Definitely Shipp Right WOOVE I know last time I talked to you were talking about the big fight Shipp Oh right Oscar De LaHoya and Felix Trinidad I talked to you about a week before the fight WOOVE A couple days or so Shipp Right WOOVE Well I m also reading Miles Davis biography and just got to a part where he talks about his discipline and a big part of his being able to kick his heroin habit through boxing and through its discipline I was wondering maybe if there was some sort of parallel where he took his style from a fighter like Sugar Ray and if you see that same sort of thing Shipp Yeah I definitely feel that I like the whole idea of quick jabs and a lot of foot movement So I think the point that you actually just made is that playing jazz instrumental music can be like a dance And you can look at a very graceful boxer whether it be a Sugar Ray Robinson or Muhamad Ali or Roy Jones Jr you can look at a really graceful boxer as a dancer I mean a lot of the music that touches me the most is something that really does have a dance quality to it or a graceful dancing is kept in mind So if you look at a boxing performer as a dancer which I do and I think that s what he Miles Davis was getting at you can look at it as one boxer shadow boxing or two boxers together dancing being involved with the dance You know Clark Terry the trumpet player was actually a boxer I mean there are a lot of jazz musicians that had been boxers or are big boxing fans and there are a lot of boxers especially in the old days that were big jazz fans Archie Moore was a big jazz fan He was actually a jazz pianist and to me there is definitely a corelation in how rhythm is dealt with in trying not to be predictable In a boxers case if he s predictable he s going to get knocked out because the opponent s going to know his moves and be able to time and measure him And that s not a good thing to have oxygen knocked out of your brain Certainly a jazz musician doesn t want to be predictable and to me there are just a lot

    Original URL path: http://www.matthewshipp.com/press/1-woove2000/woove.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Matthew Shipp                
    response patterns because Taylor exhausted them I m more interested in creating an expanded jazz language Shipp s percussive style is fraught with lyricism which demands attention for its rich contrasts On his new Silkheart release Points The Matthew Shipp Quartet SH CD 129 Shipp pays tribute to the work of two great jazzmen the orchestral suites of Duke Ellington and the African polyrhythms of Coltrane s music I wanted to expand the basic relationships of a jazz quartet into a fuller orchestral sound like Duke Ellington comments Shipp I start with a core idea and shuffle the individual players through a series of events that always refer back to the core idea On his recent release Circular Temple The Matthew Shipp Trio Quinton Records OTN I Shipp creates four movements beginning with Ellington s 20s jungle music and stretching out on a neo bop segment dedicated to Thelonicus Monk The third section highlights bassist William Parker s sparse phrasing and the piece concludes with allusions to Africa as a unifying principle Apart from his work as a leader Shipp regularly performs in the David S Ware Quartet Tenor saxist Ware s new efforts The Great Bliss Project Vols I and 2 Silkheart SH CD 127 128 feature Shipp as does percussionist Marc Edwards Black Queen Alpha Phonics APCDI Shipp also appears on Ware s masterful Flight of i DIW DIW856 which includes two jazz standards There Will Never Be Another You and Yesterdays Shipp recently toured the South with prominent jazz saxist Roscoe Mitchell who co founded the Art Ensemble of Chicago I m a young blood pianist remarks Shipp and I m really excited about exploring new post Coltrane ideas with Mitchell He s a great innovator who has given me the opportunity to express some of my

    Original URL path: http://www.matthewshipp.com/press/1-1_gallery/gallery.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Matthew Shipp                
    be approached without walls that is opened to fresh interpretations that can provide an expanded harmonic space i e allow for the non classical What makes him different from the other musicians who take this approach Cecil Taylor for example Mr Shipp says is that while they are both rhythmical stylistically he himself employs a more delicate touch a more nodal approach While there are jazz elements in his playing he is not concerned with playing jazz as such his concerns are more with the metaphysics of the language of music as a whole of total rhythmic tonal hypothesis His thought is pure line the coming together of very separate linear fnigments His compositions while improvisational are not confined an eight bar idea with thirty two bar solos accompanied by a rhythm section but address more the questions posed by the logical resolution of a phrase in a group setting The diatonic does not interest him as do clusters of notes He would avoid the cliches imposed by a classical jazz tradition Born in Wiliragton Delaware in 1960 Mr Shipp began playing piano at the age of five encouraged by an organist uncle not long after attracted the attention of Robert Boysie Lowery a teacher of jazz great Clifford Brown Contintung his studies there through high school he left Delaware at the age of twenty two heading for New England where he attended both Berklee the New England Conservatory of Music where he studied with Dennis Sandole teacher among others of John Coltrane James Moody Art Farmer though he more often than not forwent classes for his own practice Coming to the East Village in 84 because he couldn t make it playing new music in Boston he worked with alto saxophonist Rob Brown with whom he d attended the

    Original URL path: http://www.matthewshipp.com/press/1-2_lesnews_1990/lesnews.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Nu Bop -- Matthew Shipp Quintet
    The secret weapon though is a bank of electronics manned by Chris Flam Flam doesn t mess around with the basic jazz tracks this isn t another version of Masses last year s Spring Heel Jack project Instead the electronics mesh and occasionally do battle with Shipp s piano But not on every track there are piano solos here too Shipp s playing has simplified in the last few years

    Original URL path: http://www.matthewshipp.com/alt_press.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Nu Bop -- Matthew Shipp Quintet
    What is surprising is how his turn towards DJ culture is so unforced and spontaneous William Parker s use of the plucked bass as a vast resonant drum provides the backbone of the rhythms to which FLAM adds puttering synth beats and Guillermo E Brown s turbulent Mardi Gras drums FLAM s samples lipsmacking female orgasmic squeaks keep the feel wet arid live Daniel Carter plays saxophone and flute The five guys are working together on a new groove there s an amusing moment of studio banter where the musicians jive about needing to get their brains to go dead to play the jagged rhythms Shipp requires and so there isn t much space for Carter to play the expressive melodic lines he s celebrated for He floats the melody Ornette Coleman style over the beat on Nu Bop and on X Ray he plays some haunting flute underpinned by Parker s mighty plucked bass Buoyed by Shipp s cunning harmonies the effect is hallucinatory Shipp screws with the piano sound by shifting his mic placement On Select Mode 1 his sprinkled high notes are raw and ringing over bowed groans from Parker and interference swirls from FLAM You are

    Original URL path: http://www.matthewshipp.com/wire.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Nu Bop -- Matthew Shipp Quintet
    spend a winter on an abandoned chicken farm in Duluth Minnesota this is what I would want with me to keep my sanity Artist Release Track title Label Kirk Degiorgio presents 21st Century Soul Ubiquity DNTEL Life Is Full Of Plug Research Tweak Hybrid Organics Straight Ahead Matthew Shipp Nu Bop Thirsty Ear Sigur Ros Hilmar Angels Of The Universe Fat Cat Kaidi Tatham Is Agent K Laws Of Motion

    Original URL path: http://www.matthewshipp.com/xlr8r.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Nu Bop -- Matthew Shipp Quintet
    sonic effects with a bebop environmental intensity at times that make the title track Nu Bop feel really cerebral But then the saxophone riffs from Daniel Carter and Guillermo E Brown s drumming temper its head music aspect with some unexpected emotional twists I thought that was a real nice touch MATT SHIPP I guess I can t help but be heady That s kind of my nature I think it s a specific type of thought and it s going to follow anything I do around I did kind of want a situation where people in some parts of it could just feel with their body without the usual thing I carry around Which is great for what it is There s other ways to feel music without having to delve deep down into your soul all of the time SOTJ Introspection is the focus on ZX 1 with your low key yet precise intensity What was the inspiration for this piece MATT SHIPP That s a very interesting question because A I was just trying to break up the CD as far as what is being presented I just wanted something that would set up the rest of the CD but would be a second to take a breath B I wanted to kind of have a piece that has some continuation of the feel of my last CD NEW ORBIT in that it was spacious and had kind of a meditative introspective sound I definitely wanted a piece that somehow made reference to NEW ORBIT without the theme C I wanted to have something that had some type of slow linear motion that even though I never resorted to the aspects of Thelonious Monk that are an influence on me never overtly like playing a Monk riff or line I wanted a slow moving linear piece that kind of had some type of abstraction on how Monk actually influenced me and would be apparent through the note choices So those things 3 things working together all added up to creating that piece SOTJ Space Shipp Rocket Shipp are really cool uses of metaphor for self expression The key word here is that you take flight with some awesome piano chops that lift on your solos and glimmer with raw greatness Flam is unabashed and William Parker is holding down some great bass logic Did you lay this down in the studio together or was it mixed later MATT SHIPP Laughs A lot of stuff happened on this CD Let s just say I came into the studio with a huge outline I wanted things to go a very specific way and we pretty much went by the outline I had some rhythm tracks that Flam had generated and brought into the studio on the computer and those were played in the studio We played over them but I had very specific ideas of what I wanted people s parts to be even though they were given a

    Original URL path: http://www.matthewshipp.com/soundsotjazz.html (2016-02-12)
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