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  • MEDIchair - The Home Medical Equipment Specialists - New Brunswick
    ALS Aging Arthritis Broken Hip Cystic Fibrosis Diabetes Incontinence Multiple Sclerosis Osteoporosis Parkinson s Disease Spina Bifida Spinal Cord Spinal Muscular Atrophy Stroke Learning Centre CPAP Therapy Daily Living Aids Healthy Feet and Legs Home Accessibility House Calls Beds Incontinence Lift Chairs Long Term Care Manual Wheelchairs Mobility Scooter Patient Handling Devices Power Wheelchair Stairlifts Van Conversions Bathroom Safety Healthy Back Walking Aids Funding Assistance National Agencies British Columbia Agencies Alberta Agencies Saskatchewan Agencies Manitoba Agencies Ontario Agencies Locations All Locations Alberta British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick Northern Territories Ontario Saskatchewan About Us About Us Privacy Security Policy Careers Contact MEDIchair Shop Online Rental Products In Home Assesments In Home Trials Home Delivery Set up In House Service New Brunswick MONCTON 331 Elmwood Moncton NB E1A 7Y1 Phone 506 855 8842 Fax 506 855 8843 Toll Free 1 877 854 8842 Contact Form get directions 331 Elmwood u00a0Moncton NB E1A 7Y1 Phone 506 855 8842 Fax 506 855 8843 Toll Free 1 877 854 8842 mainIcon red dot style default width 200 height 200 mapTypeId roadmap zoom 17 mapCtrl 1 typeCtrl 0 directions 0 unitSystem 0 clusterMarker 0 styler invert lightness 0 styler hue styler saturation 0 styler lightness 0

    Original URL path: http://www.medichair.com/index.php/new-brunswick (2016-02-11)
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  • MEDIchair - The Home Medical Equipment Specialists - British Columbia
    Accessibility House Calls Beds Incontinence Lift Chairs Long Term Care Manual Wheelchairs Mobility Scooter Patient Handling Devices Power Wheelchair Stairlifts Van Conversions Bathroom Safety Healthy Back Walking Aids Funding Assistance National Agencies British Columbia Agencies Alberta Agencies Saskatchewan Agencies Manitoba Agencies Ontario Agencies Locations All Locations Alberta British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick Northern Territories Ontario Saskatchewan About Us About Us Privacy Security Policy Careers Contact MEDIchair Shop Online Rental Products In Home Assesments In Home Trials Home Delivery Set up In House Service BRITISH COLUMBIA Vancouver 7460 Edmonds Street Burnaby BC V3N 1B2 Phone 604 524 4000 Fax 604 524 6111 Toll Free 1 800 661 1416 Contact Form Get Directions Vancouver 7460 Edmonds Street Burnaby BC V3N 1B2 Phone 604 524 4000 Fax 604 524 6111 Toll Free u00a01 800 661 1416 mainIcon red dot style default width 200 height 200 mapTypeId roadmap zoom 17 mapCtrl 1 typeCtrl 0 directions 0 unitSystem 0 clusterMarker 0 styler invert lightness 0 styler hue styler saturation 0 styler lightness 0 styler gamma 0 adresses Store Hours Sunday Closed Monday 9am 5pm Tuesday 9am 5pm Wednesday 9am 5pm Thursday 9am 5pm Friday 9am 5pm Saturday 10 am 3pm Closed STAT holidays Northern British

    Original URL path: http://www.medichair.com/index.php/british-columbia (2016-02-11)
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  • MEDIchair - The Home Medical Equipment Specialists - Northern Territories
    Osteoporosis Parkinson s Disease Spina Bifida Spinal Cord Spinal Muscular Atrophy Stroke Learning Centre CPAP Therapy Daily Living Aids Healthy Feet and Legs Home Accessibility House Calls Beds Incontinence Lift Chairs Long Term Care Manual Wheelchairs Mobility Scooter Patient Handling Devices Power Wheelchair Stairlifts Van Conversions Bathroom Safety Healthy Back Walking Aids Funding Assistance National Agencies British Columbia Agencies Alberta Agencies Saskatchewan Agencies Manitoba Agencies Ontario Agencies Locations All Locations Alberta British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick Northern Territories Ontario Saskatchewan About Us About Us Privacy Security Policy Careers Contact MEDIchair Shop Online Rental Products In Home Assesments In Home Trials Home Delivery Set up In House Service Northern Territories YUKON Inside Horwood s Mall 122 1116 Front Street Whitehorse YT Y1A 1A3 Phone 867 393 4967 Fax 867 393 4870 Contact Form get directions Whitehorse r n 122 1116 u00a0 Front Street Whitehorse Yukon Y1A 1A3 r n ph 867 393 4967 u00a0 fx 867 393 4870 tf 1 800 667 5545 mainIcon red dot style default width 200 height 200 mapTypeId roadmap zoom 17 mapCtrl 1 typeCtrl 0 directions 0 unitSystem 0 clusterMarker 0 styler invert lightness 0 styler hue styler saturation 0 styler lightness 0 styler gamma 0

    Original URL path: http://www.medichair.com/index.php/northern-territories (2016-02-11)
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  • MEDIchair - The Home Medical Equipment Specialists - Saskatchewan
    Legs Home Accessibility House Calls Beds Incontinence Lift Chairs Long Term Care Manual Wheelchairs Mobility Scooter Patient Handling Devices Power Wheelchair Stairlifts Van Conversions Bathroom Safety Healthy Back Walking Aids Funding Assistance National Agencies British Columbia Agencies Alberta Agencies Saskatchewan Agencies Manitoba Agencies Ontario Agencies Locations All Locations Alberta British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick Northern Territories Ontario Saskatchewan About Us About Us Privacy Security Policy Careers Contact MEDIchair Shop Online Rental Products In Home Assesments In Home Trials Home Delivery Set up In House Service SASKATCHEWAN SASKATOON 616 Duchess St Saskatoon SK S7K 0R1 Phone 306 242 2804 Fax 306 242 4022 Toll Free 1 888 327 6495 Contact Form get directions Saskatoon r n 616 Duchess St Saskatoon SK S7K 0R1 ph 306 242 2804 fx 306 242 4022 tf 1 888 327 6495 mainIcon red dot style default width 200 height 200 mapTypeId roadmap zoom 17 mapCtrl 1 typeCtrl 0 directions 0 unitSystem 0 clusterMarker 0 styler invert lightness 0 styler hue styler saturation 0 styler lightness 0 styler gamma 0 adresses Store Hours Mon 9 AM 5 PM Tues 9 AM 5 PM Wed 9 AM 5 PM Thurs 9 AM 5 PM Fri 9 AM 5

    Original URL path: http://www.medichair.com/index.php/saskatchewan (2016-02-11)
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  • MEDIchair - The Home Medical Equipment Specialists - ALS
    having Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis ALS He died at the age of 38 What Causes ALS The cause is not yet known although several theories are now being researched At present neither a cure for ALS nor a means of prevention is known In 1993 scientists announced in a paper published in the British journal Nature that they had isolated the gene associated with about 20 of the cases of the inherited form of the disease While only 10 of ALS patients have this genetic predisposition there is no evidence of a clinical difference between the familial and the sporadic forms of the illness Does ALS Cause Pain The onset is insidious and without pain As the disease progresses muscle cramping can occur In its final stages the wasting of the body may cause severe pain Extreme mental anguish is often caused by a lively unimpaired mind trapped in a totally immobilized body What Parts of the Body Does ALS Affect ALS does not affect the mind because it attacks only motor neurons The person with ALS remains mentally sharp and in full possession of the senses of sight hearing taste smell and touch Are There Different Types of ALS Sporadic which is the most common form of ALS Familial a small number of cases suggest genetic inheritance of ALS Guamanian a high number of cases of ALS occur in Guam and the Trust Territories of the Pacific What are the Early Symptoms of ALS ALS usually becomes apparent either in the throat or upper chest area or in the arms and legs Some people begin to trip and fall some lose the use of their hands and arms some find it hard to swallow and some slur their speech Can You Catch ALS ALS cannot be caught It is not

    Original URL path: http://www.medichair.com/index.php/als (2016-02-11)
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  • MEDIchair - The Home Medical Equipment Specialists - Arthritis
    In many cases the joint involvement in the limbs becomes relatively symmetrical Further the cervical spine usually the superior aspect becomes affected and patients must be watched carefully for disruption of the atlantoaxial joint In advanced cases of the disease subluxation at the atlantoaxial joint can occur Early in the course of the disease several changes on joint structures occur Joint effusion and inflammation of the synovium occur producing a soft tissue swelling that is easily detected during evaluation of the patient Additionally changes osteoporosis in the ends of the bones forming the joint may be present early in the disease process The attack on a joint by the disease usually begins with the synovium Early in the disease edema begins to be seen in cells in the synovium and multiplication of synovial lining cells occurs As the disease progresses the synovium may grow considerably larger eventually forming tissue called pannus Pannus can be considered the most destructive element affecting joints in the patient with rheumatoid arthritis Pannus can attack articular cartilage and destroy it Further pannus can destroy the soft subchondral bone once the protective articular cartilage is gone The synovial fluid secreted by the synovium is thought to serve two main purposes lubrication of the joint and provision of nutrients to the avascular articular cartilage In this disease process interaction between antibodies and antigens occurs causing alterations in the composition of the synovial fluid Ultimately digestants are formed in the fluid which attack the surrounding tissue Once the composition of this fluid is altered it is less able to perform the normal functions noted above and more likely to become destructive The changes in the synovium and synovial fluid briefly described above are responsible for a large amount of joint and soft tissue destruction The destruction of bone eventually leads to laxity in tendons and ligaments Under the strain of daily activities and other forces these alterations in bone and joint structure result in the deformities frequently seen with rheumatoid arthritis Considerable destruction of the joint can occur with pannus invading the subchondral bone Bone destruction occurs at areas where the hyaline cartilage and the synovial lining do not adequately cover the bone If the disease progresses to a more advanced stage the articular cartilage may lose its structure and density resulting in an inability to withstand the normal forces placed on the joint In these advanced cases muscle activity causes the involved ends of the bones to be compressed together causing further bone destruction Further the disease can irreversibly change the structure and function of a joint to the degree that other degenerative changes may occur especially in the weight bearing joints of the body Joint destruction can progress to the degree that joint motion is significantly limited and joints can become markedly unstable Prevention of Disability and Preservation of Function Another major element in the treatment of patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis is to prevent disability and preserve bodily function One way to achieve this goal is

    Original URL path: http://www.medichair.com/index.php/arthritis (2016-02-11)
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  • MEDIchair - The Home Medical Equipment Specialists - Aging
    Territories Ontario Saskatchewan About Us About Us Privacy Security Policy Careers Contact MEDIchair Shop Online Aging is a natural process that is the future of all living creatures The number of people over 65 increases annually Since aging is an inevitable fact it must be discussed in the sense of the coherent problems Medical care has provided longer life but is no guarantee of a trouble free physical or mental existence To a varying extent the following conditions of aging appear and often progress in later years Muscles fatigue easily and there is less endurance With decreased body movement joints can become stiff There is a tendency toward hardening of the arteries Muscle reaction to stimuli slows and concentration becomes more difficult Many of the senses may experience partial or complete loss Body resistance declines increasing susceptibility to infection Decreased circulation and absorption of calcium from the bones may result in osteoporosis shown by skeletal shrinkage and an increased tendency to bone fractures more prevalent in women Incontinence concerns Although aging is neither a disease nor an accident it requires consideration and understanding to satisfy the needs of the geriatric client who may require assistive devices Concerns Associated with Aging Chronic Pain Many seniors endure a variety of aches and pains Chronic pain can have a serious impact on physical and emotional well being Common sources of chronic pain include migraine headaches and arthritis The most common forms of arthritis in the aging population are Osteoarthritis Fibromyalgia and Rheumatoid Arthritis Falls and In Home Injuries Falls are very common among the elderly and can be caused by intrinsic and extrinsic factors Intrinsic factors are related causes which are external to the person such as the physical environment Some examples associated with falls are unkept sidewalks poor or wet walking surfaces

    Original URL path: http://www.medichair.com/index.php/aging (2016-02-11)
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  • MEDIchair - The Home Medical Equipment Specialists - Broken Hip
    Medications weakness or dizziness due to adverse side effects of medication Why Do Broken Hips Occur The upper femur in young people is one of the strongest bones in the body With aging and disease the upper femur weakens and becomes vulnerable to a fracture Why Do Bones Weaken Bone is a living tissue composed mainly of calcium and protein Bones with high calcium content are strong Healthy bone is always being re modeled That is small amounts are being replaced If more bone calcium is absorbed than is replaced the density or the mass of the bone is reduced This bone becomes progressively weaker increasing the risk that it may break Loss of bone tends to occur mostly in the spine lower forearm above the wrist and upper femur the site of hip fractures Spine fractures wrist fractures and hip fractures are common injuries in older people A gradual loss of bone mass generally beginning about age 35 is a fact of life for everyone After growth is complete women ultimately lose 30 to 50 of their bone density and men lose 20 to 30 Women lose bone calcium at an accelerated pace once they go through menopause Menstrual periods cease because a woman s body produces less estrogen hormone Estrogen in women is important for the maintenance of bone mass or bone strength A measurement of bone density when menopause begins may help women decide whether to use estrogen replacement therapy to retard bone loss How to Prevent Broken Hips Orthopedic surgeons experts in the care and treatment of patients with fractured hips are concerned about the epidemic of hip fractures and the impact these severe injuries have on patients their families and on society Orthopaedists know that prevention of hip fractures is far better and far less costly than treatment after the bone is broken Here s what can be done Ensure that diet contains the necessary calcium and vitamin D during childhood adolescence and adulthood Vitamin D plays a major role in calcium absorption and its incorporation in bone A doctor may recommend an increase in intake of vitamin D after menopause Elderly people may consume less vitamin D and absorb calcium poorly A doctor should be consulted concerning increasing daily intake of vitamin D Exercise to minimize bone lose Weight bearing exercise such a walking considered one of the best methods of maintaining bone strength jogging hiking climbing stairs dancing aquatic exercises treadmill exercises and weight training are very important Consult a doctor before beginning any vigorous exercise program Doctors will evaluate physical condition and help decide which activities are best The National Institute of Aging recommends beginning an exercise program slowly especially if one has been inactive Starting with short periods of about 5 to10 minutes twice a week and building up slowly adding a few minutes each week It is possible to build up to exercise periods of 15 to 30 minutes three to four times a week Proper diagnosis and early treatment

    Original URL path: http://www.medichair.com/index.php/broken-hip (2016-02-11)
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