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  • Metric clock - Minkukel
    and education spread across generations with at least 1 transition generation that starts with one system and goes to a second system Possibly as many as 3 or 4 transitional generations and probably close to a century of effort I believe that we are stuck with our base 60 time for the foreseeable long term future Not that this isn t a novel idea and would actually make programming time based processors easier as base 10 is easily translatable to binary with fewer computational cycles although in actual practicality with the speed of today s processors the gain in cycles wouldn t be worth it in terms of the cost of the conversion I believe that it will remain an interesting thought experiment and probably nothing more Reply Steven says September 23 2014 at 2 43 pm I ve always liked the idea of metric time but I didn t realise that someone had already built a clock for it For the naming I think it would be smoother to have the minute as the centre so we have a kilominute day hectominute hour and centiminute second Possibly even clearer to replace minute with another word say periode french for period This would give us kiloperiode 1000 periodes 1 day hectoperiode 100 periodes 1 decimal hour periode 1 decimal minute and centiperiode 1 100 periodes 1 decimal second Reply Linda says December 8 2012 at 12 30 am This is nice but what I REALLY need is a chart showing minutes converted to decimal time For instance 3 minutes of time I know that 15 minutes 25 30 minutes 50 45 minutes 75 but what about 10 minutes Reply Landi Coverman says October 7 2013 at 12 21 am hey this might help if u are saying 3 metric min into normal min 3 metric min 4 2 normal min 10 metric min 14 4 normal min Reply Andy says August 26 2014 at 1 13 pm You re still basing your decimalisation on a traditional base60 time Thus 10 minutes will count for 166667 of an hour In your case you simply divide the amount of minutes you want in decimals by 60 So that 15 seconds 15 60 is 25 30 seconds 30 60 is 5 and so on Reply Dan says December 23 2012 at 9 41 am The halfwit spoke and the brainless believed Taking a non metric time period like a day and converting the numbers is not true metric timekeeping Fun nonetheless Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 22 pm What s non metric about a day It s just as metric as a gram or a meter You just have to start with something and divide and multiply it by 10 Reply Austin says August 5 2014 at 2 31 am Ironic that you call him a halfwit Any system has to use some basic measurement as a frame of reference The kilometer uses the meter as the basic frame of reference the gram uses a gram etc Those units are metric but applying your logic you d say they are not No unit is intrinsically metric What makes something metric is a conversion factor of ten or a decimal system the presented format does exactly that Reply Ashraf Zainal says January 20 2013 at 9 41 pm How many days in metric week Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 20 pm The obvious answer would be 10 days in a week and then 10 weeks in a month That would be 100 days in a month Problem is that with a year being 365 25 days we would then have 3 6525 months in a year If we start the other way around a year should have 10 months Each month would have 36 525 days We would again have 10 weeks in a month so there would be 3 6525 days in a week Mmmm that doesn t sound very metric but I could live with it if we keep the 2 day weekend that leaves us just 1 6 days to work each week Will have to think a bit more about this Reply Chris Kennedy says May 5 2015 at 11 00 pm the metric system normalizes numbers The universe not so much If your higher power intended there to be a metric system then the earth would circumnavigate the sun on a power of 10 number of revolutions of the earth around it s axis Then a year could be 10 months and a month 10 days and a day 10 hours and an hour 10 minutes and a minute 10 seconds god likely has better things to do with his or her time In such a universe one year would be one kilohour Reply Mahendra Singh says December 5 2013 at 12 01 am 10 Days in Metric week i e called Deca Day mahendrasingh666 yahoo com Reply Mario says January 15 2016 at 3 28 pm The metric week have to come from the metric calendar not the metric clock We cant have a metric calendar because the number of days in year can not be change We can change the amount of months and the amount of days in each month but the total of days remains the same 365 or 366 Reply Skieagle says March 2 2013 at 2 47 am for yearly try 364 days 28 days per month 13 months in a year Reply Mahendra Singh says August 26 2013 at 11 53 pm This is a metric clock Metric calender system We want to prepare metric clock in time unit this is 10 seconds in a one metric menute 10 menutes in a one metric hour 10 metric hours in one metric day 10 m day in a decaday or week 10 m months in a 1 metric yeAR AND SO ON Reply Julio Bussone says September 19 2013 at 10 48 pm Suppose a Metric Clock

    Original URL path: http://minkukel.com/scripts/metric-clock/?replytocom=134601 (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Metric clock - Minkukel
    and education spread across generations with at least 1 transition generation that starts with one system and goes to a second system Possibly as many as 3 or 4 transitional generations and probably close to a century of effort I believe that we are stuck with our base 60 time for the foreseeable long term future Not that this isn t a novel idea and would actually make programming time based processors easier as base 10 is easily translatable to binary with fewer computational cycles although in actual practicality with the speed of today s processors the gain in cycles wouldn t be worth it in terms of the cost of the conversion I believe that it will remain an interesting thought experiment and probably nothing more Reply Steven says September 23 2014 at 2 43 pm I ve always liked the idea of metric time but I didn t realise that someone had already built a clock for it For the naming I think it would be smoother to have the minute as the centre so we have a kilominute day hectominute hour and centiminute second Possibly even clearer to replace minute with another word say periode french for period This would give us kiloperiode 1000 periodes 1 day hectoperiode 100 periodes 1 decimal hour periode 1 decimal minute and centiperiode 1 100 periodes 1 decimal second Reply Linda says December 8 2012 at 12 30 am This is nice but what I REALLY need is a chart showing minutes converted to decimal time For instance 3 minutes of time I know that 15 minutes 25 30 minutes 50 45 minutes 75 but what about 10 minutes Reply Landi Coverman says October 7 2013 at 12 21 am hey this might help if u are saying 3 metric min into normal min 3 metric min 4 2 normal min 10 metric min 14 4 normal min Reply Andy says August 26 2014 at 1 13 pm You re still basing your decimalisation on a traditional base60 time Thus 10 minutes will count for 166667 of an hour In your case you simply divide the amount of minutes you want in decimals by 60 So that 15 seconds 15 60 is 25 30 seconds 30 60 is 5 and so on Reply Dan says December 23 2012 at 9 41 am The halfwit spoke and the brainless believed Taking a non metric time period like a day and converting the numbers is not true metric timekeeping Fun nonetheless Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 22 pm What s non metric about a day It s just as metric as a gram or a meter You just have to start with something and divide and multiply it by 10 Reply Austin says August 5 2014 at 2 31 am Ironic that you call him a halfwit Any system has to use some basic measurement as a frame of reference The kilometer uses the meter as the basic frame of reference the gram uses a gram etc Those units are metric but applying your logic you d say they are not No unit is intrinsically metric What makes something metric is a conversion factor of ten or a decimal system the presented format does exactly that Reply Ashraf Zainal says January 20 2013 at 9 41 pm How many days in metric week Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 20 pm The obvious answer would be 10 days in a week and then 10 weeks in a month That would be 100 days in a month Problem is that with a year being 365 25 days we would then have 3 6525 months in a year If we start the other way around a year should have 10 months Each month would have 36 525 days We would again have 10 weeks in a month so there would be 3 6525 days in a week Mmmm that doesn t sound very metric but I could live with it if we keep the 2 day weekend that leaves us just 1 6 days to work each week Will have to think a bit more about this Reply Chris Kennedy says May 5 2015 at 11 00 pm the metric system normalizes numbers The universe not so much If your higher power intended there to be a metric system then the earth would circumnavigate the sun on a power of 10 number of revolutions of the earth around it s axis Then a year could be 10 months and a month 10 days and a day 10 hours and an hour 10 minutes and a minute 10 seconds god likely has better things to do with his or her time In such a universe one year would be one kilohour Reply Mahendra Singh says December 5 2013 at 12 01 am 10 Days in Metric week i e called Deca Day mahendrasingh666 yahoo com Reply Mario says January 15 2016 at 3 28 pm The metric week have to come from the metric calendar not the metric clock We cant have a metric calendar because the number of days in year can not be change We can change the amount of months and the amount of days in each month but the total of days remains the same 365 or 366 Reply Skieagle says March 2 2013 at 2 47 am for yearly try 364 days 28 days per month 13 months in a year Reply Mahendra Singh says August 26 2013 at 11 53 pm This is a metric clock Metric calender system We want to prepare metric clock in time unit this is 10 seconds in a one metric menute 10 menutes in a one metric hour 10 metric hours in one metric day 10 m day in a decaday or week 10 m months in a 1 metric yeAR AND SO ON Reply Julio Bussone says September 19 2013 at 10 48 pm Suppose a Metric Clock

    Original URL path: http://minkukel.com/scripts/metric-clock/?replytocom=142808 (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Metric clock - Minkukel
    and education spread across generations with at least 1 transition generation that starts with one system and goes to a second system Possibly as many as 3 or 4 transitional generations and probably close to a century of effort I believe that we are stuck with our base 60 time for the foreseeable long term future Not that this isn t a novel idea and would actually make programming time based processors easier as base 10 is easily translatable to binary with fewer computational cycles although in actual practicality with the speed of today s processors the gain in cycles wouldn t be worth it in terms of the cost of the conversion I believe that it will remain an interesting thought experiment and probably nothing more Reply Steven says September 23 2014 at 2 43 pm I ve always liked the idea of metric time but I didn t realise that someone had already built a clock for it For the naming I think it would be smoother to have the minute as the centre so we have a kilominute day hectominute hour and centiminute second Possibly even clearer to replace minute with another word say periode french for period This would give us kiloperiode 1000 periodes 1 day hectoperiode 100 periodes 1 decimal hour periode 1 decimal minute and centiperiode 1 100 periodes 1 decimal second Reply Linda says December 8 2012 at 12 30 am This is nice but what I REALLY need is a chart showing minutes converted to decimal time For instance 3 minutes of time I know that 15 minutes 25 30 minutes 50 45 minutes 75 but what about 10 minutes Reply Landi Coverman says October 7 2013 at 12 21 am hey this might help if u are saying 3 metric min into normal min 3 metric min 4 2 normal min 10 metric min 14 4 normal min Reply Andy says August 26 2014 at 1 13 pm You re still basing your decimalisation on a traditional base60 time Thus 10 minutes will count for 166667 of an hour In your case you simply divide the amount of minutes you want in decimals by 60 So that 15 seconds 15 60 is 25 30 seconds 30 60 is 5 and so on Reply Dan says December 23 2012 at 9 41 am The halfwit spoke and the brainless believed Taking a non metric time period like a day and converting the numbers is not true metric timekeeping Fun nonetheless Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 22 pm What s non metric about a day It s just as metric as a gram or a meter You just have to start with something and divide and multiply it by 10 Reply Austin says August 5 2014 at 2 31 am Ironic that you call him a halfwit Any system has to use some basic measurement as a frame of reference The kilometer uses the meter as the basic frame of reference the gram uses a gram etc Those units are metric but applying your logic you d say they are not No unit is intrinsically metric What makes something metric is a conversion factor of ten or a decimal system the presented format does exactly that Reply Ashraf Zainal says January 20 2013 at 9 41 pm How many days in metric week Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 20 pm The obvious answer would be 10 days in a week and then 10 weeks in a month That would be 100 days in a month Problem is that with a year being 365 25 days we would then have 3 6525 months in a year If we start the other way around a year should have 10 months Each month would have 36 525 days We would again have 10 weeks in a month so there would be 3 6525 days in a week Mmmm that doesn t sound very metric but I could live with it if we keep the 2 day weekend that leaves us just 1 6 days to work each week Will have to think a bit more about this Reply Chris Kennedy says May 5 2015 at 11 00 pm the metric system normalizes numbers The universe not so much If your higher power intended there to be a metric system then the earth would circumnavigate the sun on a power of 10 number of revolutions of the earth around it s axis Then a year could be 10 months and a month 10 days and a day 10 hours and an hour 10 minutes and a minute 10 seconds god likely has better things to do with his or her time In such a universe one year would be one kilohour Reply Mahendra Singh says December 5 2013 at 12 01 am 10 Days in Metric week i e called Deca Day mahendrasingh666 yahoo com Reply Mario says January 15 2016 at 3 28 pm The metric week have to come from the metric calendar not the metric clock We cant have a metric calendar because the number of days in year can not be change We can change the amount of months and the amount of days in each month but the total of days remains the same 365 or 366 Reply Skieagle says March 2 2013 at 2 47 am for yearly try 364 days 28 days per month 13 months in a year Reply Mahendra Singh says August 26 2013 at 11 53 pm This is a metric clock Metric calender system We want to prepare metric clock in time unit this is 10 seconds in a one metric menute 10 menutes in a one metric hour 10 metric hours in one metric day 10 m day in a decaday or week 10 m months in a 1 metric yeAR AND SO ON Reply Julio Bussone says September 19 2013 at 10 48 pm Suppose a Metric Clock

    Original URL path: http://minkukel.com/scripts/metric-clock/?replytocom=134591 (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Metric clock - Minkukel
    and education spread across generations with at least 1 transition generation that starts with one system and goes to a second system Possibly as many as 3 or 4 transitional generations and probably close to a century of effort I believe that we are stuck with our base 60 time for the foreseeable long term future Not that this isn t a novel idea and would actually make programming time based processors easier as base 10 is easily translatable to binary with fewer computational cycles although in actual practicality with the speed of today s processors the gain in cycles wouldn t be worth it in terms of the cost of the conversion I believe that it will remain an interesting thought experiment and probably nothing more Reply Steven says September 23 2014 at 2 43 pm I ve always liked the idea of metric time but I didn t realise that someone had already built a clock for it For the naming I think it would be smoother to have the minute as the centre so we have a kilominute day hectominute hour and centiminute second Possibly even clearer to replace minute with another word say periode french for period This would give us kiloperiode 1000 periodes 1 day hectoperiode 100 periodes 1 decimal hour periode 1 decimal minute and centiperiode 1 100 periodes 1 decimal second Reply Linda says December 8 2012 at 12 30 am This is nice but what I REALLY need is a chart showing minutes converted to decimal time For instance 3 minutes of time I know that 15 minutes 25 30 minutes 50 45 minutes 75 but what about 10 minutes Reply Landi Coverman says October 7 2013 at 12 21 am hey this might help if u are saying 3 metric min into normal min 3 metric min 4 2 normal min 10 metric min 14 4 normal min Reply Andy says August 26 2014 at 1 13 pm You re still basing your decimalisation on a traditional base60 time Thus 10 minutes will count for 166667 of an hour In your case you simply divide the amount of minutes you want in decimals by 60 So that 15 seconds 15 60 is 25 30 seconds 30 60 is 5 and so on Reply Dan says December 23 2012 at 9 41 am The halfwit spoke and the brainless believed Taking a non metric time period like a day and converting the numbers is not true metric timekeeping Fun nonetheless Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 22 pm What s non metric about a day It s just as metric as a gram or a meter You just have to start with something and divide and multiply it by 10 Reply Austin says August 5 2014 at 2 31 am Ironic that you call him a halfwit Any system has to use some basic measurement as a frame of reference The kilometer uses the meter as the basic frame of reference the gram uses a gram etc Those units are metric but applying your logic you d say they are not No unit is intrinsically metric What makes something metric is a conversion factor of ten or a decimal system the presented format does exactly that Reply Ashraf Zainal says January 20 2013 at 9 41 pm How many days in metric week Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 20 pm The obvious answer would be 10 days in a week and then 10 weeks in a month That would be 100 days in a month Problem is that with a year being 365 25 days we would then have 3 6525 months in a year If we start the other way around a year should have 10 months Each month would have 36 525 days We would again have 10 weeks in a month so there would be 3 6525 days in a week Mmmm that doesn t sound very metric but I could live with it if we keep the 2 day weekend that leaves us just 1 6 days to work each week Will have to think a bit more about this Reply Chris Kennedy says May 5 2015 at 11 00 pm the metric system normalizes numbers The universe not so much If your higher power intended there to be a metric system then the earth would circumnavigate the sun on a power of 10 number of revolutions of the earth around it s axis Then a year could be 10 months and a month 10 days and a day 10 hours and an hour 10 minutes and a minute 10 seconds god likely has better things to do with his or her time In such a universe one year would be one kilohour Reply Mahendra Singh says December 5 2013 at 12 01 am 10 Days in Metric week i e called Deca Day mahendrasingh666 yahoo com Reply Mario says January 15 2016 at 3 28 pm The metric week have to come from the metric calendar not the metric clock We cant have a metric calendar because the number of days in year can not be change We can change the amount of months and the amount of days in each month but the total of days remains the same 365 or 366 Reply Skieagle says March 2 2013 at 2 47 am for yearly try 364 days 28 days per month 13 months in a year Reply Mahendra Singh says August 26 2013 at 11 53 pm This is a metric clock Metric calender system We want to prepare metric clock in time unit this is 10 seconds in a one metric menute 10 menutes in a one metric hour 10 metric hours in one metric day 10 m day in a decaday or week 10 m months in a 1 metric yeAR AND SO ON Reply Julio Bussone says September 19 2013 at 10 48 pm Suppose a Metric Clock

    Original URL path: http://minkukel.com/scripts/metric-clock/?replytocom=142579 (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Metric clock - Minkukel
    and education spread across generations with at least 1 transition generation that starts with one system and goes to a second system Possibly as many as 3 or 4 transitional generations and probably close to a century of effort I believe that we are stuck with our base 60 time for the foreseeable long term future Not that this isn t a novel idea and would actually make programming time based processors easier as base 10 is easily translatable to binary with fewer computational cycles although in actual practicality with the speed of today s processors the gain in cycles wouldn t be worth it in terms of the cost of the conversion I believe that it will remain an interesting thought experiment and probably nothing more Reply Steven says September 23 2014 at 2 43 pm I ve always liked the idea of metric time but I didn t realise that someone had already built a clock for it For the naming I think it would be smoother to have the minute as the centre so we have a kilominute day hectominute hour and centiminute second Possibly even clearer to replace minute with another word say periode french for period This would give us kiloperiode 1000 periodes 1 day hectoperiode 100 periodes 1 decimal hour periode 1 decimal minute and centiperiode 1 100 periodes 1 decimal second Reply Linda says December 8 2012 at 12 30 am This is nice but what I REALLY need is a chart showing minutes converted to decimal time For instance 3 minutes of time I know that 15 minutes 25 30 minutes 50 45 minutes 75 but what about 10 minutes Reply Landi Coverman says October 7 2013 at 12 21 am hey this might help if u are saying 3 metric min into normal min 3 metric min 4 2 normal min 10 metric min 14 4 normal min Reply Andy says August 26 2014 at 1 13 pm You re still basing your decimalisation on a traditional base60 time Thus 10 minutes will count for 166667 of an hour In your case you simply divide the amount of minutes you want in decimals by 60 So that 15 seconds 15 60 is 25 30 seconds 30 60 is 5 and so on Reply Dan says December 23 2012 at 9 41 am The halfwit spoke and the brainless believed Taking a non metric time period like a day and converting the numbers is not true metric timekeeping Fun nonetheless Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 22 pm What s non metric about a day It s just as metric as a gram or a meter You just have to start with something and divide and multiply it by 10 Reply Austin says August 5 2014 at 2 31 am Ironic that you call him a halfwit Any system has to use some basic measurement as a frame of reference The kilometer uses the meter as the basic frame of reference the gram uses a gram etc Those units are metric but applying your logic you d say they are not No unit is intrinsically metric What makes something metric is a conversion factor of ten or a decimal system the presented format does exactly that Reply Ashraf Zainal says January 20 2013 at 9 41 pm How many days in metric week Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 20 pm The obvious answer would be 10 days in a week and then 10 weeks in a month That would be 100 days in a month Problem is that with a year being 365 25 days we would then have 3 6525 months in a year If we start the other way around a year should have 10 months Each month would have 36 525 days We would again have 10 weeks in a month so there would be 3 6525 days in a week Mmmm that doesn t sound very metric but I could live with it if we keep the 2 day weekend that leaves us just 1 6 days to work each week Will have to think a bit more about this Reply Chris Kennedy says May 5 2015 at 11 00 pm the metric system normalizes numbers The universe not so much If your higher power intended there to be a metric system then the earth would circumnavigate the sun on a power of 10 number of revolutions of the earth around it s axis Then a year could be 10 months and a month 10 days and a day 10 hours and an hour 10 minutes and a minute 10 seconds god likely has better things to do with his or her time In such a universe one year would be one kilohour Reply Mahendra Singh says December 5 2013 at 12 01 am 10 Days in Metric week i e called Deca Day mahendrasingh666 yahoo com Reply Mario says January 15 2016 at 3 28 pm The metric week have to come from the metric calendar not the metric clock We cant have a metric calendar because the number of days in year can not be change We can change the amount of months and the amount of days in each month but the total of days remains the same 365 or 366 Reply Skieagle says March 2 2013 at 2 47 am for yearly try 364 days 28 days per month 13 months in a year Reply Mahendra Singh says August 26 2013 at 11 53 pm This is a metric clock Metric calender system We want to prepare metric clock in time unit this is 10 seconds in a one metric menute 10 menutes in a one metric hour 10 metric hours in one metric day 10 m day in a decaday or week 10 m months in a 1 metric yeAR AND SO ON Reply Julio Bussone says September 19 2013 at 10 48 pm Suppose a Metric Clock

    Original URL path: http://minkukel.com/scripts/metric-clock/?replytocom=142783 (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Metric clock - Minkukel
    and education spread across generations with at least 1 transition generation that starts with one system and goes to a second system Possibly as many as 3 or 4 transitional generations and probably close to a century of effort I believe that we are stuck with our base 60 time for the foreseeable long term future Not that this isn t a novel idea and would actually make programming time based processors easier as base 10 is easily translatable to binary with fewer computational cycles although in actual practicality with the speed of today s processors the gain in cycles wouldn t be worth it in terms of the cost of the conversion I believe that it will remain an interesting thought experiment and probably nothing more Reply Steven says September 23 2014 at 2 43 pm I ve always liked the idea of metric time but I didn t realise that someone had already built a clock for it For the naming I think it would be smoother to have the minute as the centre so we have a kilominute day hectominute hour and centiminute second Possibly even clearer to replace minute with another word say periode french for period This would give us kiloperiode 1000 periodes 1 day hectoperiode 100 periodes 1 decimal hour periode 1 decimal minute and centiperiode 1 100 periodes 1 decimal second Reply Linda says December 8 2012 at 12 30 am This is nice but what I REALLY need is a chart showing minutes converted to decimal time For instance 3 minutes of time I know that 15 minutes 25 30 minutes 50 45 minutes 75 but what about 10 minutes Reply Landi Coverman says October 7 2013 at 12 21 am hey this might help if u are saying 3 metric min into normal min 3 metric min 4 2 normal min 10 metric min 14 4 normal min Reply Andy says August 26 2014 at 1 13 pm You re still basing your decimalisation on a traditional base60 time Thus 10 minutes will count for 166667 of an hour In your case you simply divide the amount of minutes you want in decimals by 60 So that 15 seconds 15 60 is 25 30 seconds 30 60 is 5 and so on Reply Dan says December 23 2012 at 9 41 am The halfwit spoke and the brainless believed Taking a non metric time period like a day and converting the numbers is not true metric timekeeping Fun nonetheless Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 22 pm What s non metric about a day It s just as metric as a gram or a meter You just have to start with something and divide and multiply it by 10 Reply Austin says August 5 2014 at 2 31 am Ironic that you call him a halfwit Any system has to use some basic measurement as a frame of reference The kilometer uses the meter as the basic frame of reference the gram uses a gram etc Those units are metric but applying your logic you d say they are not No unit is intrinsically metric What makes something metric is a conversion factor of ten or a decimal system the presented format does exactly that Reply Ashraf Zainal says January 20 2013 at 9 41 pm How many days in metric week Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 20 pm The obvious answer would be 10 days in a week and then 10 weeks in a month That would be 100 days in a month Problem is that with a year being 365 25 days we would then have 3 6525 months in a year If we start the other way around a year should have 10 months Each month would have 36 525 days We would again have 10 weeks in a month so there would be 3 6525 days in a week Mmmm that doesn t sound very metric but I could live with it if we keep the 2 day weekend that leaves us just 1 6 days to work each week Will have to think a bit more about this Reply Chris Kennedy says May 5 2015 at 11 00 pm the metric system normalizes numbers The universe not so much If your higher power intended there to be a metric system then the earth would circumnavigate the sun on a power of 10 number of revolutions of the earth around it s axis Then a year could be 10 months and a month 10 days and a day 10 hours and an hour 10 minutes and a minute 10 seconds god likely has better things to do with his or her time In such a universe one year would be one kilohour Reply Mahendra Singh says December 5 2013 at 12 01 am 10 Days in Metric week i e called Deca Day mahendrasingh666 yahoo com Reply Mario says January 15 2016 at 3 28 pm The metric week have to come from the metric calendar not the metric clock We cant have a metric calendar because the number of days in year can not be change We can change the amount of months and the amount of days in each month but the total of days remains the same 365 or 366 Reply Skieagle says March 2 2013 at 2 47 am for yearly try 364 days 28 days per month 13 months in a year Reply Mahendra Singh says August 26 2013 at 11 53 pm This is a metric clock Metric calender system We want to prepare metric clock in time unit this is 10 seconds in a one metric menute 10 menutes in a one metric hour 10 metric hours in one metric day 10 m day in a decaday or week 10 m months in a 1 metric yeAR AND SO ON Reply Julio Bussone says September 19 2013 at 10 48 pm Suppose a Metric Clock

    Original URL path: http://minkukel.com/scripts/metric-clock/?replytocom=142785 (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive


  • 224 Grey 05 D8D8D8 216 216 216 Grey 06 D0D0D0 208 208 208 Grey 07 C8C8C8 200 200 200 Grey 08 C0C0C0 192 192 192 Grey 09 B8B8B8 184 184 184 Grey 10 B0B0B0 176 176 176 Grey 11 A8A8A8 168 168 168 Grey 12 A0A0A0 160 160 160 Grey 13 989898 152 152 152 Grey 14 909090 144 144 144 Grey 15 888888 136 136 136 Grey 16 808080 128 128 128 Grey 17 787878 120 120 120 Grey 18 707070 112 112 112 Grey 19 686868 104 104 104 Grey 20 606060 96 96 96 Grey 21 585858 88 88 88 Grey 22 505050 80 80 80 Grey 23 484848 72 72 72 Grey 24 404040 64 64 64 Grey 25 383838 56 56 56 Grey 26 303030 48 48 48 Grey 27 282828 40 40 40 Grey 28 202020 32 32 32 Grey 29 181818 24 24 24 Grey 30 101010 16 16 16 Grey 31 080808 8 8 8 Grey 32 black 000000 0 0 0 Honeydew F0FFF0 240 255 240 Hot Pink FF69B4 255 105 180 Hunter Green 215E21 33 94 33 Indian Red 1 4E2F2F 78 47 47 Indian Red 2 CD5C5C 205 92 92 Indigo 4B0082 75 0 130 Ivory FFFFF0 255 255 240 Khaki 1 9F9F5F 159 159 95 Khaki 2 F0E68C 240 230 140 Lavender E6E6FA 230 230 250 Lavender Blush FFF0F5 255 240 245 Lawn Green 7CFC00 124 252 0 Lemon Chiffon FFFACD 255 250 205 Light Blue 1 C0D9D9 192 217 217 Light Blue 2 ADD8E6 173 216 230 Light Coral F08080 240 128 128 Light Cyan E0FFFF 224 255 255 Light Goldenrod Yellow FAFAD2 250 250 210 Light Green 90EE90 144 238 144 Light Grey 1 A8A8A8 168 168 168 Light Grey 2 D3D3D3 211 211 211 Light Pink FFB6C1 255 182 193 Light Salmon FFA07A 255 160 122 Light Sea Green 20B2AA 32 178 170 Light Sky Blue 87CEFA 135 206 250 Light Slate Blue 8470FF 132 112 255 Light Slate Grey 778899 119 136 153 Light Steel Blue 1 8F8FBD 143 143 189 Light Steel Blue 2 B0C4DE 176 196 222 Light Wood E9C2A6 233 194 166 Light Yellow FFFFE0 255 255 224 Lime 00FF00 0 255 0 Lime Green 32CD32 50 205 50 Linen FAF0E6 250 240 230 Magenta FF00FF 255 0 255 Mandarian Orange E47833 228 120 51 Maroon 800000 128 0 0 Medium Aquamarine 1 32CD99 50 205 153 Medium Aquamarine 2 66CDAA 102 205 170 Medium Blue 1 3232CD 50 50 205 Medium Blue 2 0000CD 0 0 205 Medium Forest Green 6B8E23 107 142 35 Medium Goldenrod EAEAAE 234 234 174 Medium Orchid 1 9370DB 147 112 219 Medium Orchid 2 BA55D3 186 85 211 Medium Purple 9370DB 147 112 219 Medium Sea Green 1 426F42 66 111 66 Medium Sea Green 2 3CB371 60 179 113 Medium Slate Blue 1 7F00FF 127 0 255 Medium Slate Blue 2 7B68EE 123 104 238 Medium Spring Green 1 7FFF00 127 255 0

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  • Simulate tennis matches - Minkukel
    a singles game I lose 0 6 I might win a few points on my serve but I can never win enough points on my serve consistently At best I might get to deuce but the chances of me winning two points in a row are slim In doubles I am a good net poacher and win more than my fair share of matches Reply Justin McGuirk says June 19 2015 at 3 52 pm If Player A and Player B both have a strength rating of 0 5 in a best of 3 then matches won are 479 521 well if I run the same simulation a further ten times what is going to change If you do design a simulator that takes into consideration serve return of serve break points etc etc I am more than happy to pay you for it mate Many many thanks Reply Minkukel says June 19 2015 at 11 44 pm Mmmmm how much would you pay mate Definition of mate each of a pair of birds or other animals Reply Justin McGuirk says June 21 2015 at 1 48 am 500 if you designed tournament outright prices if these compared close to what bookmakers offer then that would be deemed a success also if you could put an accurate figure on a players chance of holding serve against his opponent and vice versa Again if the projected hold was close to accurate I would deem that as success Reply Minkukel says June 21 2015 at 6 31 pm I will think about it Reply Justin McGuirk says June 22 2015 at 3 16 pm Ok mate Justin McGuirk says June 24 2015 at 8 53 pm Minkukel you are obviously very good at Maths I was wondering if you had the following

    Original URL path: http://minkukel.com/scripts/simulate-tennis-matches/?replytocom=10526 (2016-04-29)
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  •