archive-com.com » COM » M » MINKUKEL.COM

Total: 175

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Metric clock - Minkukel
    and education spread across generations with at least 1 transition generation that starts with one system and goes to a second system Possibly as many as 3 or 4 transitional generations and probably close to a century of effort I believe that we are stuck with our base 60 time for the foreseeable long term future Not that this isn t a novel idea and would actually make programming time based processors easier as base 10 is easily translatable to binary with fewer computational cycles although in actual practicality with the speed of today s processors the gain in cycles wouldn t be worth it in terms of the cost of the conversion I believe that it will remain an interesting thought experiment and probably nothing more Reply Steven says September 23 2014 at 2 43 pm I ve always liked the idea of metric time but I didn t realise that someone had already built a clock for it For the naming I think it would be smoother to have the minute as the centre so we have a kilominute day hectominute hour and centiminute second Possibly even clearer to replace minute with another word say periode french for period This would give us kiloperiode 1000 periodes 1 day hectoperiode 100 periodes 1 decimal hour periode 1 decimal minute and centiperiode 1 100 periodes 1 decimal second Reply Linda says December 8 2012 at 12 30 am This is nice but what I REALLY need is a chart showing minutes converted to decimal time For instance 3 minutes of time I know that 15 minutes 25 30 minutes 50 45 minutes 75 but what about 10 minutes Reply Landi Coverman says October 7 2013 at 12 21 am hey this might help if u are saying 3 metric min into normal min 3 metric min 4 2 normal min 10 metric min 14 4 normal min Reply Andy says August 26 2014 at 1 13 pm You re still basing your decimalisation on a traditional base60 time Thus 10 minutes will count for 166667 of an hour In your case you simply divide the amount of minutes you want in decimals by 60 So that 15 seconds 15 60 is 25 30 seconds 30 60 is 5 and so on Reply Dan says December 23 2012 at 9 41 am The halfwit spoke and the brainless believed Taking a non metric time period like a day and converting the numbers is not true metric timekeeping Fun nonetheless Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 22 pm What s non metric about a day It s just as metric as a gram or a meter You just have to start with something and divide and multiply it by 10 Reply Austin says August 5 2014 at 2 31 am Ironic that you call him a halfwit Any system has to use some basic measurement as a frame of reference The kilometer uses the meter as the basic frame of reference the gram uses a gram etc Those units are metric but applying your logic you d say they are not No unit is intrinsically metric What makes something metric is a conversion factor of ten or a decimal system the presented format does exactly that Reply Ashraf Zainal says January 20 2013 at 9 41 pm How many days in metric week Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 20 pm The obvious answer would be 10 days in a week and then 10 weeks in a month That would be 100 days in a month Problem is that with a year being 365 25 days we would then have 3 6525 months in a year If we start the other way around a year should have 10 months Each month would have 36 525 days We would again have 10 weeks in a month so there would be 3 6525 days in a week Mmmm that doesn t sound very metric but I could live with it if we keep the 2 day weekend that leaves us just 1 6 days to work each week Will have to think a bit more about this Reply Chris Kennedy says May 5 2015 at 11 00 pm the metric system normalizes numbers The universe not so much If your higher power intended there to be a metric system then the earth would circumnavigate the sun on a power of 10 number of revolutions of the earth around it s axis Then a year could be 10 months and a month 10 days and a day 10 hours and an hour 10 minutes and a minute 10 seconds god likely has better things to do with his or her time In such a universe one year would be one kilohour Reply Mahendra Singh says December 5 2013 at 12 01 am 10 Days in Metric week i e called Deca Day mahendrasingh666 yahoo com Reply Mario says January 15 2016 at 3 28 pm The metric week have to come from the metric calendar not the metric clock We cant have a metric calendar because the number of days in year can not be change We can change the amount of months and the amount of days in each month but the total of days remains the same 365 or 366 Reply Skieagle says March 2 2013 at 2 47 am for yearly try 364 days 28 days per month 13 months in a year Reply Mahendra Singh says August 26 2013 at 11 53 pm This is a metric clock Metric calender system We want to prepare metric clock in time unit this is 10 seconds in a one metric menute 10 menutes in a one metric hour 10 metric hours in one metric day 10 m day in a decaday or week 10 m months in a 1 metric yeAR AND SO ON Reply Julio Bussone says September 19 2013 at 10 48 pm Suppose a Metric Clock

    Original URL path: http://minkukel.com/scripts/metric-clock/?replytocom=4993 (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Metric clock - Minkukel
    and education spread across generations with at least 1 transition generation that starts with one system and goes to a second system Possibly as many as 3 or 4 transitional generations and probably close to a century of effort I believe that we are stuck with our base 60 time for the foreseeable long term future Not that this isn t a novel idea and would actually make programming time based processors easier as base 10 is easily translatable to binary with fewer computational cycles although in actual practicality with the speed of today s processors the gain in cycles wouldn t be worth it in terms of the cost of the conversion I believe that it will remain an interesting thought experiment and probably nothing more Reply Steven says September 23 2014 at 2 43 pm I ve always liked the idea of metric time but I didn t realise that someone had already built a clock for it For the naming I think it would be smoother to have the minute as the centre so we have a kilominute day hectominute hour and centiminute second Possibly even clearer to replace minute with another word say periode french for period This would give us kiloperiode 1000 periodes 1 day hectoperiode 100 periodes 1 decimal hour periode 1 decimal minute and centiperiode 1 100 periodes 1 decimal second Reply Linda says December 8 2012 at 12 30 am This is nice but what I REALLY need is a chart showing minutes converted to decimal time For instance 3 minutes of time I know that 15 minutes 25 30 minutes 50 45 minutes 75 but what about 10 minutes Reply Landi Coverman says October 7 2013 at 12 21 am hey this might help if u are saying 3 metric min into normal min 3 metric min 4 2 normal min 10 metric min 14 4 normal min Reply Andy says August 26 2014 at 1 13 pm You re still basing your decimalisation on a traditional base60 time Thus 10 minutes will count for 166667 of an hour In your case you simply divide the amount of minutes you want in decimals by 60 So that 15 seconds 15 60 is 25 30 seconds 30 60 is 5 and so on Reply Dan says December 23 2012 at 9 41 am The halfwit spoke and the brainless believed Taking a non metric time period like a day and converting the numbers is not true metric timekeeping Fun nonetheless Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 22 pm What s non metric about a day It s just as metric as a gram or a meter You just have to start with something and divide and multiply it by 10 Reply Austin says August 5 2014 at 2 31 am Ironic that you call him a halfwit Any system has to use some basic measurement as a frame of reference The kilometer uses the meter as the basic frame of reference the gram uses a gram etc Those units are metric but applying your logic you d say they are not No unit is intrinsically metric What makes something metric is a conversion factor of ten or a decimal system the presented format does exactly that Reply Ashraf Zainal says January 20 2013 at 9 41 pm How many days in metric week Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 20 pm The obvious answer would be 10 days in a week and then 10 weeks in a month That would be 100 days in a month Problem is that with a year being 365 25 days we would then have 3 6525 months in a year If we start the other way around a year should have 10 months Each month would have 36 525 days We would again have 10 weeks in a month so there would be 3 6525 days in a week Mmmm that doesn t sound very metric but I could live with it if we keep the 2 day weekend that leaves us just 1 6 days to work each week Will have to think a bit more about this Reply Chris Kennedy says May 5 2015 at 11 00 pm the metric system normalizes numbers The universe not so much If your higher power intended there to be a metric system then the earth would circumnavigate the sun on a power of 10 number of revolutions of the earth around it s axis Then a year could be 10 months and a month 10 days and a day 10 hours and an hour 10 minutes and a minute 10 seconds god likely has better things to do with his or her time In such a universe one year would be one kilohour Reply Mahendra Singh says December 5 2013 at 12 01 am 10 Days in Metric week i e called Deca Day mahendrasingh666 yahoo com Reply Mario says January 15 2016 at 3 28 pm The metric week have to come from the metric calendar not the metric clock We cant have a metric calendar because the number of days in year can not be change We can change the amount of months and the amount of days in each month but the total of days remains the same 365 or 366 Reply Skieagle says March 2 2013 at 2 47 am for yearly try 364 days 28 days per month 13 months in a year Reply Mahendra Singh says August 26 2013 at 11 53 pm This is a metric clock Metric calender system We want to prepare metric clock in time unit this is 10 seconds in a one metric menute 10 menutes in a one metric hour 10 metric hours in one metric day 10 m day in a decaday or week 10 m months in a 1 metric yeAR AND SO ON Reply Julio Bussone says September 19 2013 at 10 48 pm Suppose a Metric Clock

    Original URL path: http://minkukel.com/scripts/metric-clock/?replytocom=60055 (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Metric clock - Minkukel
    and education spread across generations with at least 1 transition generation that starts with one system and goes to a second system Possibly as many as 3 or 4 transitional generations and probably close to a century of effort I believe that we are stuck with our base 60 time for the foreseeable long term future Not that this isn t a novel idea and would actually make programming time based processors easier as base 10 is easily translatable to binary with fewer computational cycles although in actual practicality with the speed of today s processors the gain in cycles wouldn t be worth it in terms of the cost of the conversion I believe that it will remain an interesting thought experiment and probably nothing more Reply Steven says September 23 2014 at 2 43 pm I ve always liked the idea of metric time but I didn t realise that someone had already built a clock for it For the naming I think it would be smoother to have the minute as the centre so we have a kilominute day hectominute hour and centiminute second Possibly even clearer to replace minute with another word say periode french for period This would give us kiloperiode 1000 periodes 1 day hectoperiode 100 periodes 1 decimal hour periode 1 decimal minute and centiperiode 1 100 periodes 1 decimal second Reply Linda says December 8 2012 at 12 30 am This is nice but what I REALLY need is a chart showing minutes converted to decimal time For instance 3 minutes of time I know that 15 minutes 25 30 minutes 50 45 minutes 75 but what about 10 minutes Reply Landi Coverman says October 7 2013 at 12 21 am hey this might help if u are saying 3 metric min into normal min 3 metric min 4 2 normal min 10 metric min 14 4 normal min Reply Andy says August 26 2014 at 1 13 pm You re still basing your decimalisation on a traditional base60 time Thus 10 minutes will count for 166667 of an hour In your case you simply divide the amount of minutes you want in decimals by 60 So that 15 seconds 15 60 is 25 30 seconds 30 60 is 5 and so on Reply Dan says December 23 2012 at 9 41 am The halfwit spoke and the brainless believed Taking a non metric time period like a day and converting the numbers is not true metric timekeeping Fun nonetheless Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 22 pm What s non metric about a day It s just as metric as a gram or a meter You just have to start with something and divide and multiply it by 10 Reply Austin says August 5 2014 at 2 31 am Ironic that you call him a halfwit Any system has to use some basic measurement as a frame of reference The kilometer uses the meter as the basic frame of reference the gram uses a gram etc Those units are metric but applying your logic you d say they are not No unit is intrinsically metric What makes something metric is a conversion factor of ten or a decimal system the presented format does exactly that Reply Ashraf Zainal says January 20 2013 at 9 41 pm How many days in metric week Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 20 pm The obvious answer would be 10 days in a week and then 10 weeks in a month That would be 100 days in a month Problem is that with a year being 365 25 days we would then have 3 6525 months in a year If we start the other way around a year should have 10 months Each month would have 36 525 days We would again have 10 weeks in a month so there would be 3 6525 days in a week Mmmm that doesn t sound very metric but I could live with it if we keep the 2 day weekend that leaves us just 1 6 days to work each week Will have to think a bit more about this Reply Chris Kennedy says May 5 2015 at 11 00 pm the metric system normalizes numbers The universe not so much If your higher power intended there to be a metric system then the earth would circumnavigate the sun on a power of 10 number of revolutions of the earth around it s axis Then a year could be 10 months and a month 10 days and a day 10 hours and an hour 10 minutes and a minute 10 seconds god likely has better things to do with his or her time In such a universe one year would be one kilohour Reply Mahendra Singh says December 5 2013 at 12 01 am 10 Days in Metric week i e called Deca Day mahendrasingh666 yahoo com Reply Mario says January 15 2016 at 3 28 pm The metric week have to come from the metric calendar not the metric clock We cant have a metric calendar because the number of days in year can not be change We can change the amount of months and the amount of days in each month but the total of days remains the same 365 or 366 Reply Skieagle says March 2 2013 at 2 47 am for yearly try 364 days 28 days per month 13 months in a year Reply Mahendra Singh says August 26 2013 at 11 53 pm This is a metric clock Metric calender system We want to prepare metric clock in time unit this is 10 seconds in a one metric menute 10 menutes in a one metric hour 10 metric hours in one metric day 10 m day in a decaday or week 10 m months in a 1 metric yeAR AND SO ON Reply Julio Bussone says September 19 2013 at 10 48 pm Suppose a Metric Clock

    Original URL path: http://minkukel.com/scripts/metric-clock/?replytocom=5096 (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Metric clock - Minkukel
    education spread across generations with at least 1 transition generation that starts with one system and goes to a second system Possibly as many as 3 or 4 transitional generations and probably close to a century of effort I believe that we are stuck with our base 60 time for the foreseeable long term future Not that this isn t a novel idea and would actually make programming time based processors easier as base 10 is easily translatable to binary with fewer computational cycles although in actual practicality with the speed of today s processors the gain in cycles wouldn t be worth it in terms of the cost of the conversion I believe that it will remain an interesting thought experiment and probably nothing more Reply Steven says September 23 2014 at 2 43 pm I ve always liked the idea of metric time but I didn t realise that someone had already built a clock for it For the naming I think it would be smoother to have the minute as the centre so we have a kilominute day hectominute hour and centiminute second Possibly even clearer to replace minute with another word say periode french for period This would give us kiloperiode 1000 periodes 1 day hectoperiode 100 periodes 1 decimal hour periode 1 decimal minute and centiperiode 1 100 periodes 1 decimal second Reply Linda says December 8 2012 at 12 30 am This is nice but what I REALLY need is a chart showing minutes converted to decimal time For instance 3 minutes of time I know that 15 minutes 25 30 minutes 50 45 minutes 75 but what about 10 minutes Reply Landi Coverman says October 7 2013 at 12 21 am hey this might help if u are saying 3 metric min into normal min 3 metric min 4 2 normal min 10 metric min 14 4 normal min Reply Andy says August 26 2014 at 1 13 pm You re still basing your decimalisation on a traditional base60 time Thus 10 minutes will count for 166667 of an hour In your case you simply divide the amount of minutes you want in decimals by 60 So that 15 seconds 15 60 is 25 30 seconds 30 60 is 5 and so on Reply Dan says December 23 2012 at 9 41 am The halfwit spoke and the brainless believed Taking a non metric time period like a day and converting the numbers is not true metric timekeeping Fun nonetheless Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 22 pm What s non metric about a day It s just as metric as a gram or a meter You just have to start with something and divide and multiply it by 10 Reply Austin says August 5 2014 at 2 31 am Ironic that you call him a halfwit Any system has to use some basic measurement as a frame of reference The kilometer uses the meter as the basic frame of reference the gram uses a gram etc Those units are metric but applying your logic you d say they are not No unit is intrinsically metric What makes something metric is a conversion factor of ten or a decimal system the presented format does exactly that Reply Ashraf Zainal says January 20 2013 at 9 41 pm How many days in metric week Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 20 pm The obvious answer would be 10 days in a week and then 10 weeks in a month That would be 100 days in a month Problem is that with a year being 365 25 days we would then have 3 6525 months in a year If we start the other way around a year should have 10 months Each month would have 36 525 days We would again have 10 weeks in a month so there would be 3 6525 days in a week Mmmm that doesn t sound very metric but I could live with it if we keep the 2 day weekend that leaves us just 1 6 days to work each week Will have to think a bit more about this Reply Chris Kennedy says May 5 2015 at 11 00 pm the metric system normalizes numbers The universe not so much If your higher power intended there to be a metric system then the earth would circumnavigate the sun on a power of 10 number of revolutions of the earth around it s axis Then a year could be 10 months and a month 10 days and a day 10 hours and an hour 10 minutes and a minute 10 seconds god likely has better things to do with his or her time In such a universe one year would be one kilohour Reply Mahendra Singh says December 5 2013 at 12 01 am 10 Days in Metric week i e called Deca Day mahendrasingh666 yahoo com Reply Mario says January 15 2016 at 3 28 pm The metric week have to come from the metric calendar not the metric clock We cant have a metric calendar because the number of days in year can not be change We can change the amount of months and the amount of days in each month but the total of days remains the same 365 or 366 Reply Skieagle says March 2 2013 at 2 47 am for yearly try 364 days 28 days per month 13 months in a year Reply Mahendra Singh says August 26 2013 at 11 53 pm This is a metric clock Metric calender system We want to prepare metric clock in time unit this is 10 seconds in a one metric menute 10 menutes in a one metric hour 10 metric hours in one metric day 10 m day in a decaday or week 10 m months in a 1 metric yeAR AND SO ON Reply Julio Bussone says September 19 2013 at 10 48 pm Suppose a Metric Clock uses

    Original URL path: http://minkukel.com/scripts/metric-clock/?replytocom=17043 (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Metric clock - Minkukel
    and education spread across generations with at least 1 transition generation that starts with one system and goes to a second system Possibly as many as 3 or 4 transitional generations and probably close to a century of effort I believe that we are stuck with our base 60 time for the foreseeable long term future Not that this isn t a novel idea and would actually make programming time based processors easier as base 10 is easily translatable to binary with fewer computational cycles although in actual practicality with the speed of today s processors the gain in cycles wouldn t be worth it in terms of the cost of the conversion I believe that it will remain an interesting thought experiment and probably nothing more Reply Steven says September 23 2014 at 2 43 pm I ve always liked the idea of metric time but I didn t realise that someone had already built a clock for it For the naming I think it would be smoother to have the minute as the centre so we have a kilominute day hectominute hour and centiminute second Possibly even clearer to replace minute with another word say periode french for period This would give us kiloperiode 1000 periodes 1 day hectoperiode 100 periodes 1 decimal hour periode 1 decimal minute and centiperiode 1 100 periodes 1 decimal second Reply Linda says December 8 2012 at 12 30 am This is nice but what I REALLY need is a chart showing minutes converted to decimal time For instance 3 minutes of time I know that 15 minutes 25 30 minutes 50 45 minutes 75 but what about 10 minutes Reply Landi Coverman says October 7 2013 at 12 21 am hey this might help if u are saying 3 metric min into normal min 3 metric min 4 2 normal min 10 metric min 14 4 normal min Reply Andy says August 26 2014 at 1 13 pm You re still basing your decimalisation on a traditional base60 time Thus 10 minutes will count for 166667 of an hour In your case you simply divide the amount of minutes you want in decimals by 60 So that 15 seconds 15 60 is 25 30 seconds 30 60 is 5 and so on Reply Dan says December 23 2012 at 9 41 am The halfwit spoke and the brainless believed Taking a non metric time period like a day and converting the numbers is not true metric timekeeping Fun nonetheless Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 22 pm What s non metric about a day It s just as metric as a gram or a meter You just have to start with something and divide and multiply it by 10 Reply Austin says August 5 2014 at 2 31 am Ironic that you call him a halfwit Any system has to use some basic measurement as a frame of reference The kilometer uses the meter as the basic frame of reference the gram uses a gram etc Those units are metric but applying your logic you d say they are not No unit is intrinsically metric What makes something metric is a conversion factor of ten or a decimal system the presented format does exactly that Reply Ashraf Zainal says January 20 2013 at 9 41 pm How many days in metric week Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 20 pm The obvious answer would be 10 days in a week and then 10 weeks in a month That would be 100 days in a month Problem is that with a year being 365 25 days we would then have 3 6525 months in a year If we start the other way around a year should have 10 months Each month would have 36 525 days We would again have 10 weeks in a month so there would be 3 6525 days in a week Mmmm that doesn t sound very metric but I could live with it if we keep the 2 day weekend that leaves us just 1 6 days to work each week Will have to think a bit more about this Reply Chris Kennedy says May 5 2015 at 11 00 pm the metric system normalizes numbers The universe not so much If your higher power intended there to be a metric system then the earth would circumnavigate the sun on a power of 10 number of revolutions of the earth around it s axis Then a year could be 10 months and a month 10 days and a day 10 hours and an hour 10 minutes and a minute 10 seconds god likely has better things to do with his or her time In such a universe one year would be one kilohour Reply Mahendra Singh says December 5 2013 at 12 01 am 10 Days in Metric week i e called Deca Day mahendrasingh666 yahoo com Reply Mario says January 15 2016 at 3 28 pm The metric week have to come from the metric calendar not the metric clock We cant have a metric calendar because the number of days in year can not be change We can change the amount of months and the amount of days in each month but the total of days remains the same 365 or 366 Reply Skieagle says March 2 2013 at 2 47 am for yearly try 364 days 28 days per month 13 months in a year Reply Mahendra Singh says August 26 2013 at 11 53 pm This is a metric clock Metric calender system We want to prepare metric clock in time unit this is 10 seconds in a one metric menute 10 menutes in a one metric hour 10 metric hours in one metric day 10 m day in a decaday or week 10 m months in a 1 metric yeAR AND SO ON Reply Julio Bussone says September 19 2013 at 10 48 pm Suppose a Metric Clock

    Original URL path: http://minkukel.com/scripts/metric-clock/?replytocom=52073 (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Metric clock - Minkukel
    and education spread across generations with at least 1 transition generation that starts with one system and goes to a second system Possibly as many as 3 or 4 transitional generations and probably close to a century of effort I believe that we are stuck with our base 60 time for the foreseeable long term future Not that this isn t a novel idea and would actually make programming time based processors easier as base 10 is easily translatable to binary with fewer computational cycles although in actual practicality with the speed of today s processors the gain in cycles wouldn t be worth it in terms of the cost of the conversion I believe that it will remain an interesting thought experiment and probably nothing more Reply Steven says September 23 2014 at 2 43 pm I ve always liked the idea of metric time but I didn t realise that someone had already built a clock for it For the naming I think it would be smoother to have the minute as the centre so we have a kilominute day hectominute hour and centiminute second Possibly even clearer to replace minute with another word say periode french for period This would give us kiloperiode 1000 periodes 1 day hectoperiode 100 periodes 1 decimal hour periode 1 decimal minute and centiperiode 1 100 periodes 1 decimal second Reply Linda says December 8 2012 at 12 30 am This is nice but what I REALLY need is a chart showing minutes converted to decimal time For instance 3 minutes of time I know that 15 minutes 25 30 minutes 50 45 minutes 75 but what about 10 minutes Reply Landi Coverman says October 7 2013 at 12 21 am hey this might help if u are saying 3 metric min into normal min 3 metric min 4 2 normal min 10 metric min 14 4 normal min Reply Andy says August 26 2014 at 1 13 pm You re still basing your decimalisation on a traditional base60 time Thus 10 minutes will count for 166667 of an hour In your case you simply divide the amount of minutes you want in decimals by 60 So that 15 seconds 15 60 is 25 30 seconds 30 60 is 5 and so on Reply Dan says December 23 2012 at 9 41 am The halfwit spoke and the brainless believed Taking a non metric time period like a day and converting the numbers is not true metric timekeeping Fun nonetheless Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 22 pm What s non metric about a day It s just as metric as a gram or a meter You just have to start with something and divide and multiply it by 10 Reply Austin says August 5 2014 at 2 31 am Ironic that you call him a halfwit Any system has to use some basic measurement as a frame of reference The kilometer uses the meter as the basic frame of reference the gram uses a gram etc Those units are metric but applying your logic you d say they are not No unit is intrinsically metric What makes something metric is a conversion factor of ten or a decimal system the presented format does exactly that Reply Ashraf Zainal says January 20 2013 at 9 41 pm How many days in metric week Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 20 pm The obvious answer would be 10 days in a week and then 10 weeks in a month That would be 100 days in a month Problem is that with a year being 365 25 days we would then have 3 6525 months in a year If we start the other way around a year should have 10 months Each month would have 36 525 days We would again have 10 weeks in a month so there would be 3 6525 days in a week Mmmm that doesn t sound very metric but I could live with it if we keep the 2 day weekend that leaves us just 1 6 days to work each week Will have to think a bit more about this Reply Chris Kennedy says May 5 2015 at 11 00 pm the metric system normalizes numbers The universe not so much If your higher power intended there to be a metric system then the earth would circumnavigate the sun on a power of 10 number of revolutions of the earth around it s axis Then a year could be 10 months and a month 10 days and a day 10 hours and an hour 10 minutes and a minute 10 seconds god likely has better things to do with his or her time In such a universe one year would be one kilohour Reply Mahendra Singh says December 5 2013 at 12 01 am 10 Days in Metric week i e called Deca Day mahendrasingh666 yahoo com Reply Mario says January 15 2016 at 3 28 pm The metric week have to come from the metric calendar not the metric clock We cant have a metric calendar because the number of days in year can not be change We can change the amount of months and the amount of days in each month but the total of days remains the same 365 or 366 Reply Skieagle says March 2 2013 at 2 47 am for yearly try 364 days 28 days per month 13 months in a year Reply Mahendra Singh says August 26 2013 at 11 53 pm This is a metric clock Metric calender system We want to prepare metric clock in time unit this is 10 seconds in a one metric menute 10 menutes in a one metric hour 10 metric hours in one metric day 10 m day in a decaday or week 10 m months in a 1 metric yeAR AND SO ON Reply Julio Bussone says September 19 2013 at 10 48 pm Suppose a Metric Clock

    Original URL path: http://minkukel.com/scripts/metric-clock/?replytocom=6416 (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Metric clock - Minkukel
    and education spread across generations with at least 1 transition generation that starts with one system and goes to a second system Possibly as many as 3 or 4 transitional generations and probably close to a century of effort I believe that we are stuck with our base 60 time for the foreseeable long term future Not that this isn t a novel idea and would actually make programming time based processors easier as base 10 is easily translatable to binary with fewer computational cycles although in actual practicality with the speed of today s processors the gain in cycles wouldn t be worth it in terms of the cost of the conversion I believe that it will remain an interesting thought experiment and probably nothing more Reply Steven says September 23 2014 at 2 43 pm I ve always liked the idea of metric time but I didn t realise that someone had already built a clock for it For the naming I think it would be smoother to have the minute as the centre so we have a kilominute day hectominute hour and centiminute second Possibly even clearer to replace minute with another word say periode french for period This would give us kiloperiode 1000 periodes 1 day hectoperiode 100 periodes 1 decimal hour periode 1 decimal minute and centiperiode 1 100 periodes 1 decimal second Reply Linda says December 8 2012 at 12 30 am This is nice but what I REALLY need is a chart showing minutes converted to decimal time For instance 3 minutes of time I know that 15 minutes 25 30 minutes 50 45 minutes 75 but what about 10 minutes Reply Landi Coverman says October 7 2013 at 12 21 am hey this might help if u are saying 3 metric min into normal min 3 metric min 4 2 normal min 10 metric min 14 4 normal min Reply Andy says August 26 2014 at 1 13 pm You re still basing your decimalisation on a traditional base60 time Thus 10 minutes will count for 166667 of an hour In your case you simply divide the amount of minutes you want in decimals by 60 So that 15 seconds 15 60 is 25 30 seconds 30 60 is 5 and so on Reply Dan says December 23 2012 at 9 41 am The halfwit spoke and the brainless believed Taking a non metric time period like a day and converting the numbers is not true metric timekeeping Fun nonetheless Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 22 pm What s non metric about a day It s just as metric as a gram or a meter You just have to start with something and divide and multiply it by 10 Reply Austin says August 5 2014 at 2 31 am Ironic that you call him a halfwit Any system has to use some basic measurement as a frame of reference The kilometer uses the meter as the basic frame of reference the gram uses a gram etc Those units are metric but applying your logic you d say they are not No unit is intrinsically metric What makes something metric is a conversion factor of ten or a decimal system the presented format does exactly that Reply Ashraf Zainal says January 20 2013 at 9 41 pm How many days in metric week Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 20 pm The obvious answer would be 10 days in a week and then 10 weeks in a month That would be 100 days in a month Problem is that with a year being 365 25 days we would then have 3 6525 months in a year If we start the other way around a year should have 10 months Each month would have 36 525 days We would again have 10 weeks in a month so there would be 3 6525 days in a week Mmmm that doesn t sound very metric but I could live with it if we keep the 2 day weekend that leaves us just 1 6 days to work each week Will have to think a bit more about this Reply Chris Kennedy says May 5 2015 at 11 00 pm the metric system normalizes numbers The universe not so much If your higher power intended there to be a metric system then the earth would circumnavigate the sun on a power of 10 number of revolutions of the earth around it s axis Then a year could be 10 months and a month 10 days and a day 10 hours and an hour 10 minutes and a minute 10 seconds god likely has better things to do with his or her time In such a universe one year would be one kilohour Reply Mahendra Singh says December 5 2013 at 12 01 am 10 Days in Metric week i e called Deca Day mahendrasingh666 yahoo com Reply Mario says January 15 2016 at 3 28 pm The metric week have to come from the metric calendar not the metric clock We cant have a metric calendar because the number of days in year can not be change We can change the amount of months and the amount of days in each month but the total of days remains the same 365 or 366 Reply Skieagle says March 2 2013 at 2 47 am for yearly try 364 days 28 days per month 13 months in a year Reply Mahendra Singh says August 26 2013 at 11 53 pm This is a metric clock Metric calender system We want to prepare metric clock in time unit this is 10 seconds in a one metric menute 10 menutes in a one metric hour 10 metric hours in one metric day 10 m day in a decaday or week 10 m months in a 1 metric yeAR AND SO ON Reply Julio Bussone says September 19 2013 at 10 48 pm Suppose a Metric Clock

    Original URL path: http://minkukel.com/scripts/metric-clock/?replytocom=9078 (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Metric clock - Minkukel
    and education spread across generations with at least 1 transition generation that starts with one system and goes to a second system Possibly as many as 3 or 4 transitional generations and probably close to a century of effort I believe that we are stuck with our base 60 time for the foreseeable long term future Not that this isn t a novel idea and would actually make programming time based processors easier as base 10 is easily translatable to binary with fewer computational cycles although in actual practicality with the speed of today s processors the gain in cycles wouldn t be worth it in terms of the cost of the conversion I believe that it will remain an interesting thought experiment and probably nothing more Reply Steven says September 23 2014 at 2 43 pm I ve always liked the idea of metric time but I didn t realise that someone had already built a clock for it For the naming I think it would be smoother to have the minute as the centre so we have a kilominute day hectominute hour and centiminute second Possibly even clearer to replace minute with another word say periode french for period This would give us kiloperiode 1000 periodes 1 day hectoperiode 100 periodes 1 decimal hour periode 1 decimal minute and centiperiode 1 100 periodes 1 decimal second Reply Linda says December 8 2012 at 12 30 am This is nice but what I REALLY need is a chart showing minutes converted to decimal time For instance 3 minutes of time I know that 15 minutes 25 30 minutes 50 45 minutes 75 but what about 10 minutes Reply Landi Coverman says October 7 2013 at 12 21 am hey this might help if u are saying 3 metric min into normal min 3 metric min 4 2 normal min 10 metric min 14 4 normal min Reply Andy says August 26 2014 at 1 13 pm You re still basing your decimalisation on a traditional base60 time Thus 10 minutes will count for 166667 of an hour In your case you simply divide the amount of minutes you want in decimals by 60 So that 15 seconds 15 60 is 25 30 seconds 30 60 is 5 and so on Reply Dan says December 23 2012 at 9 41 am The halfwit spoke and the brainless believed Taking a non metric time period like a day and converting the numbers is not true metric timekeeping Fun nonetheless Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 22 pm What s non metric about a day It s just as metric as a gram or a meter You just have to start with something and divide and multiply it by 10 Reply Austin says August 5 2014 at 2 31 am Ironic that you call him a halfwit Any system has to use some basic measurement as a frame of reference The kilometer uses the meter as the basic frame of reference the gram uses a gram etc Those units are metric but applying your logic you d say they are not No unit is intrinsically metric What makes something metric is a conversion factor of ten or a decimal system the presented format does exactly that Reply Ashraf Zainal says January 20 2013 at 9 41 pm How many days in metric week Reply Minkukel says January 20 2013 at 10 20 pm The obvious answer would be 10 days in a week and then 10 weeks in a month That would be 100 days in a month Problem is that with a year being 365 25 days we would then have 3 6525 months in a year If we start the other way around a year should have 10 months Each month would have 36 525 days We would again have 10 weeks in a month so there would be 3 6525 days in a week Mmmm that doesn t sound very metric but I could live with it if we keep the 2 day weekend that leaves us just 1 6 days to work each week Will have to think a bit more about this Reply Chris Kennedy says May 5 2015 at 11 00 pm the metric system normalizes numbers The universe not so much If your higher power intended there to be a metric system then the earth would circumnavigate the sun on a power of 10 number of revolutions of the earth around it s axis Then a year could be 10 months and a month 10 days and a day 10 hours and an hour 10 minutes and a minute 10 seconds god likely has better things to do with his or her time In such a universe one year would be one kilohour Reply Mahendra Singh says December 5 2013 at 12 01 am 10 Days in Metric week i e called Deca Day mahendrasingh666 yahoo com Reply Mario says January 15 2016 at 3 28 pm The metric week have to come from the metric calendar not the metric clock We cant have a metric calendar because the number of days in year can not be change We can change the amount of months and the amount of days in each month but the total of days remains the same 365 or 366 Reply Skieagle says March 2 2013 at 2 47 am for yearly try 364 days 28 days per month 13 months in a year Reply Mahendra Singh says August 26 2013 at 11 53 pm This is a metric clock Metric calender system We want to prepare metric clock in time unit this is 10 seconds in a one metric menute 10 menutes in a one metric hour 10 metric hours in one metric day 10 m day in a decaday or week 10 m months in a 1 metric yeAR AND SO ON Reply Julio Bussone says September 19 2013 at 10 48 pm Suppose a Metric Clock

    Original URL path: http://minkukel.com/scripts/metric-clock/?replytocom=41036 (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive



  •