archive-com.com » COM » N » NATIONALSPEECH.COM

Total: 50

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • National Speech/Language Therapy Center - Blog - National Speech/Language Therapy Center
    a general guideline we typically tell parents and caregivers to seek the help of an SLP when your child is frustrated at not being able to communicate effectively You are not seeing progress new skills developing Your child is having trouble following directions as would be expected at his or her age Same aged peers don t understand your child Your gut is telling you something isn t right What can I expect At the end of the day it never hurts to talk to a professional Oftentimes many of your questions are answered and you will feel relieved at having some guidance If you call to talk to an SLP he or she can help determine if it is necessary to meet with a therapist and will explain what will happen at your first visit You will be able to ask questions and will get recommendations on what to do next The earlier you call the sooner we can start making a difference and give you some peace of mind Start by searching speech language pathologists in your area asking your pediatrician for a referral or emailing calling our center 0 Comments June 14th 2013 6 14 2013 0

    Original URL path: http://www.nationalspeech.com/national-speech-blog/archives/06-2013 (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive


  • National Speech/Language Therapy Center - Blog - National Speech/Language Therapy Center
    clients seek therapy to try and reduce or eliminate stuttering and may be initially concerned with the premise of avoidance reduction therapy How long did it take for you to buy in to this approach Ben Great question For me I bought in pretty quickly No one before in my life had explained to me the cycle of avoiding stuttering the feelings and thoughts that I had and how those feelings and thoughts perpetuated and worsened my speech Once these ideas were laid out for me it was almost like a lightbulb went off in my head Yes finally what I ve experienced my entire life makes a little sense Can you explain what a typical therapy session would look like Ben A typical therapy session usually begins with the client talking a bit about how their week went The client might talk about a speaking related success they had the previous week talking about my successes helped me feel good about myself as a communicator a situation that is really bothering them these always helped me relieve some anxiety and develop a plan or a topic unrelated to speech altogether While the client is speaking the SLP is taking note of the client s speaking pattern and assessing how successfully they are hitting their target from the previous week After the client has spoken for a bit he or she usually receives feedback from the SLP This feedback can be related to the thoughts and feelings of the client dependent on what the client was saying and or his her motor pattern dependent on how the client was saying it Following feedback the client and SLP engage in some specific practice where the client has the opportunity to put the SLP s suggestions into action in a safe speaking environment This allows the client to play around with the new assignment whether motor based or cognitive based and allows the client to begin to reinforce the new behavior Following target practice the client and SLP finalize the client s assignment or plan for the week The client is told what the rationale behind the assignment is and how that target or goal fits into the client s longer term plan What aspects of avoidance reduction therapy do you think are most beneficial to you and to the individuals in your group Ben I can t speak for everyone in my group but to me the lessons I ve taken from avoidance reduction therapy are that it s OK to stutter it s OK to be vulnerable and it s OK to not be perfect everyday Contrary to what I used to think stuttering is not some giant evil monster that I need to run away from for the rest of my life It s a part of me and not a negative thing Perhaps most importantly my goals have changed since starting avoidance reduction therapy In the past my priority was to avoid stuttering at all costs regardless of how it affected the way I connected with others and how I felt about myself Today my goal is to be true to myself connect with other people say what I want to say and enjoy life as much as I can If stuttering wants to come along for the ride that s OK How do you think your stuttering has changed Does stuttering affect your life in the same way it did prior to receiving avoidance reduction therapy Ben A lot has changed since starting avoidance reduction therapy For one my stuttering pattern has definitely changed Now I keep eye contact during disfluencies The habit of tapping my knee is gone I no longer use interjections with the same degree of frequency I still contort my lips and mouth sometimes but hey it s my next goal to tackle In terms of life impact it s night and day Now I say most of what I want to say I show my personality I also have a completely different perspective of what constitutes a success for me at this point and time and what is a failure I recently gave a short talk in front of 600 people and stuttered a great deal Four years ago I wouldn t have even thought of doing it and if I had been forced to I would have viewed my immense amount of stuttering as a failure Today I recognize what an accomplishment it is for me to voluntarily speak in front of that many people I m slowly chipping away at avoidances and those are my successes Do you think that there are individuals who would not benefit from this approach Ben I think one really has to be motivated to change to undertake avoidance reduction therapy It s not easy work Doing things that petrify us is so counter intuitive If one has never talked in class before talking in class that first time is going to be really scary But talking the second time is going to be a little easier My experience of diving right into the therapy isn t the common one And my initial experiences with avoidance reduction therapy probably weren t as smooth as I m remembering them It takes time to truly change one s attitudes and beliefs This isn t an intensive short term kind of therapy But in my experience and the experience of many of my peers it s a therapy that leads to real meaningful long term change The motto short term pain long term gain really applies here I do think everyone is capable of receiving meaningful benefits from it but they ve got to put a lot in as well If you want to learn more about Avoidance Reduction therapy I highly suggest Vivian Sisskin s video Avoidance Reduction Therapy in a Group Setting available through the Stuttering Foundation of America Brooke Leiman MA CCC SLP is the fluency clinic supervisor at the National Speech Language Therapy Center

    Original URL path: http://www.nationalspeech.com/national-speech-blog/category/all (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive


  • he or she usually receives feedback from the SLP This feedback can be related to the thoughts and feelings of the client dependent on what the client was saying and or his her motor pattern dependent on how the client was saying it Following feedback the client and SLP engage in some specific practice where the client has the opportunity to put the SLP s suggestions into action in a safe speaking environment This allows the client to play around with the new assignment whether motor based or cognitive based and allows the client to begin to reinforce the new behavior Following target practice the client and SLP finalize the client s assignment or plan for the week The client is told what the rationale behind the assignment is and how that target or goal fits into the client s longer term plan What aspects of avoidance reduction therapy do you think are most beneficial to you and to the individuals in your group Ben I can t speak for everyone in my group but to me the lessons I ve taken from avoidance reduction therapy are that it s OK to stutter it s OK to be vulnerable and it s OK to not be perfect everyday Contrary to what I used to think stuttering is not some giant evil monster that I need to run away from for the rest of my life It s a part of me and not a negative thing Perhaps most importantly my goals have changed since starting avoidance reduction therapy In the past my priority was to avoid stuttering at all costs regardless of how it affected the way I connected with others and how I felt about myself Today my goal is to be true to myself connect with other people say what I want to say and enjoy life as much as I can If stuttering wants to come along for the ride that s OK How do you think your stuttering has changed Does stuttering affect your life in the same way it did prior to receiving avoidance reduction therapy Ben A lot has changed since starting avoidance reduction therapy For one my stuttering pattern has definitely changed Now I keep eye contact during disfluencies The habit of tapping my knee is gone I no longer use interjections with the same degree of frequency I still contort my lips and mouth sometimes but hey it s my next goal to tackle In terms of life impact it s night and day Now I say most of what I want to say I show my personality I also have a completely different perspective of what constitutes a success for me at this point and time and what is a failure I recently gave a short talk in front of 600 people and stuttered a great deal Four years ago I wouldn t have even thought of doing it and if I had been forced to I would have viewed my

    Original URL path: http://www.nationalspeech.com/1/feed (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Using reward charts to promote healthy eating - National Speech/Language Therapy Center
    This is where reward charts step in Using a chart is a easy way to track goals and get kids to develop new healthy eating habits Chore and behavior charts have long been in existence so here are some tips to incorporate healthy eating goals into them 1 Use a chart that the child understands Young children like to color and add stickers Older kids may earn points that they can trade in at the end of the week 2 Reference the chart during the day and have it somewhere that is visible during times other than dinner The key to this is to have your child look forward to meals 3 Start where the child can be successful Maybe he first needs to work on tolerating new items on his plate passing the bowl of peas at dinner or just taking one bite of a new food Starting slow will allow him to get excited and remain motivated when the tasks become more difficult 4 Make the rewards worth it Maybe your child is working for dessert an extra 10 minutes of TV before bed or to go to the pool at the end of the week Identifying larger rewards especially for older children will allow you to promote good behavior over an extended time 5 Have fun Let your child choose his own chart based on his favorite story book character or animal that week Get creative and add drawings pictures or stickers Make a larger than life chart on a poster board or chalk board for the whole family to see Continue to let your child know how proud you are of them and what a good job they are doing after tackling each goal They will continue to look forward to high fives and hugs as

    Original URL path: http://www.nationalspeech.com/table-blues/using-reward-charts-to-promote-healthy-eating (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Getting Kids Involved in Mealtime - National Speech/Language Therapy Center
    she will get the question Mom what s for dinner However getting kids interested in the preparing and cooking of dinner can help not only build their language skills but their motivation to try new foods Here are some tips to get kids involved in the kitchen Take kids to the grocery store I know you may want to stop right here However giving kids their own grocery list with words or pictures will help them to feel empowered and excited about whats to come Have kids unpack the groceries They can wash fruit and vegetables or help to put them away in the refrigerator Give kids a task while cooking dinner Maybe they will be the best tomato counter in the land as you have them count out 20 of each ingredient for the salad Or they can demonstrate their strength by mashing the potatoes in a bowl Don t be afraid to ask kids what they want to eat within set boundaries Instead of ordering out for pizza may individual ones at home Each family member can choose their own toppings This opens the door for many conversations as well as language tasks such as naming colors and counting Have kids be servers at dinner It could be their job to pass out the dinner rolls or to pass everyone the green beans Kids are more likely to be active participants during mealtime even the picky ones when they have a specific task to do The mealtime possibilities are endless Remember dinner is another opportunity to talk about food and where it comes from as well as spend precious time with your child Happy eating April Have a little one at home Attached are some fun pre dinner coloring sheets they will love courtesy of Nourishinteractive com cooking

    Original URL path: http://www.nationalspeech.com/table-blues/getting-kids-involved-in-mealtime (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Follow all of Table Blues' social media sites! - National Speech/Language Therapy Center
    you have any specific questions please feel free to email us directly Join in with me as we uncover a sweeter melody to mealtime Follow us on Facebook Follow all of Table Blues social media sites 6 12 2015 0 Comments Thank you for all of your support 0 Comments Your comment will be posted after it is approved Leave a Reply April Anderson MA CCC SLP Speech Language Pathologist

    Original URL path: http://www.nationalspeech.com/table-blues/follow-all-of-table-blues-social-media-sites (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Edible Play Dough - National Speech/Language Therapy Center
    If you have any specific questions please feel free to email us directly Join in with me as we uncover a sweeter melody to mealtime Follow us on Facebook Edible Play Dough 6 11 2015 0 Comments A fun weekend craft the whole family can enjoy This serves as a great protein snack for our friends without a nut allergy What you will need 1 cup creamy peanut butter 3 tablespoons honey 3 4 cup of nonfat powdered milk or powdered sugar mixing bowl Directions Mix all ingredients into a bowl Add more peanut butter if it s too dry or more powdered milk sugar if it s too sticky Wash your hands again before you play with it so you can eat it later Fun Tips Use cookie cutters to make fun shapes Get creative with pretzel sticks raw vegetables or marshmallows to create fun objects and people Put into a zip closing plastic storage bag in the refrigerator until ready to eat Make multiple batches for multiple kids This recipe was adapted from coffeecupsandcrayons com 0 Comments Your comment will be posted after it is approved Leave a Reply April Anderson MA CCC SLP Speech Language Pathologist Louisiana

    Original URL path: http://www.nationalspeech.com/table-blues/edible-play-dough (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Skip the Take Out  - National Speech/Language Therapy Center
    Staff Welcome to Table Blues Welcome to the Feeding Clinic at National Speech This site will provide advice resources and materials for parents caregivers and professionals who are working with children experiencing a feeding disorder If you have any specific questions please feel free to email us directly Join in with me as we uncover a sweeter melody to mealtime Follow us on Facebook Skip the Take Out 5 1 2015 0 Comments Today we welcomed May with open arms warmer temperatures and thoughts of the weekend on our mind Weekend dinner planning can be difficult and it is often too easy to order take out This weekend I challenge you to try a better option that will even get the kids involved Cheesy Chicken Bagel Pizzas are a great way to kick off the weekend and a healthier alternative to delivery 0 Comments Your comment will be posted after it is approved Leave a Reply April Anderson MA CCC SLP Speech Language Pathologist Louisiana State University M A Archives September 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 February 2015 Categories All RSS Feed National Speech Language Therapy Center Bethesda Office Billing and Correspondence Address 5606 Shields Drive

    Original URL path: http://www.nationalspeech.com/table-blues/skip-the-take-out (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive