archive-com.com » COM » N » NATIONALSPEECH.COM

Total: 50

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Technology and the Picky Eater - National Speech/Language Therapy Center
    app 1 99 on the app store It s a very colorful and animated app and tells the story of a kangaroo named Tiny who ventures out of her house for the first time During the story the user helps Tiny meet new friends and explore new places At the end of the story Tiny has worked up an appetite and asks the user to share some of their food with them This is where the fun begins The app allows you to take a picture of the child s food or drink and Tiny will eat the same thing right along with them The amount of time allotted is set with a timer and throughout the meal Tiny s food slowly disappears She also makes chewing noises and comments such as mmm and This is good At the end of the meal the adult can decide if the child ate enough to earn coins to go to the shop to purchase materials for mealtime or for the story Why is this a good app for a picky eater Tiny is a good example of a social story to use with children who have a fear of trying new things Social stories allow the user to not only see what Tiny sees but to become involved in the story A timer can be set to help with pacing of the meal or help the child sit at the table for a specified period of time Tiny s food and drink will disappear as she eats further engaging the child The child earns coins that can be immediately used to by utensils for mealtime or items for the story If you are looking for ways to extend mealtime or are hoping to have your child try new foods give Tiny Tastes

    Original URL path: http://www.nationalspeech.com/table-blues/-technology-and-the-picky-eater (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • More than a picky eater: How to really know?  - National Speech/Language Therapy Center
    transitioning to an age appropriate feeding pattern However children who are considered typically developing can also develop a fear of food Research shows that 25 percent of children suffer with some degree of a feeding disorder In children who suffer from a developmental neurological or genetic disorders that number rises to 80 percent Branan Ramsey 2010 A feeding disorder is characterized by any difficulties eating or drinking including chewing sucking or swallowing Children who have not developed age appropriate feeding skills and or have a genetic developmental or behavioral disorders can have difficulty during mealtime Some signs and symptoms of a problem feeder include Trouble breathing when eating or drinking Choking gagging or excessive crying during mealtimes Tantrums when presented with new foods Excessive drooling or spillage of foods liquids from the mouth Difficulty chewing or swallowing food Restricted variety of foods eaten usually less than 20 Refusal of categories of food based on texture or basic food group Refusal to eat meals with the family In order to better treat children with feeding problems it is important to understand those children who do not meet the criteria Children who are picky eaters present with the following signs and symptoms Toomey 2010 Arvedson 2008 Eat a limited variety of foods but have around 30 foods they will eat Intake enough calories a day for growth and nutrition Lose interest in a certain food for a period of time but accept it again after a few weeks Eat at least one food from all major food groups protein grains fruits etc Tolerate a new food on the plate even if they don t eat it Although mealtimes with either issue can be difficult for parents distinguishing between the two helps SLPs create the best individualized treatment approach Once a professional diagnoses

    Original URL path: http://www.nationalspeech.com/table-blues/more-than-a-picky-eater-how-to-really-know (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Blog Archives - National Speech/Language Therapy Center
    toddler requested more carrots at dinner This is where reward charts step in Using a chart is a easy way to track goals and get kids to develop new healthy eating habits Chore and behavior charts have long been in existence so here are some tips to incorporate healthy eating goals into them 1 Use a chart that the child understands Young children like to color and add stickers Older kids may earn points that they can trade in at the end of the week 2 Reference the chart during the day and have it somewhere that is visible during times other than dinner The key to this is to have your child look forward to meals 3 Start where the child can be successful Maybe he first needs to work on tolerating new items on his plate passing the bowl of peas at dinner or just taking one bite of a new food Starting slow will allow him to get excited and remain motivated when the tasks become more difficult 4 Make the rewards worth it Maybe your child is working for dessert an extra 10 minutes of TV before bed or to go to the pool at the end of the week Identifying larger rewards especially for older children will allow you to promote good behavior over an extended time 5 Have fun Let your child choose his own chart based on his favorite story book character or animal that week Get creative and add drawings pictures or stickers Make a larger than life chart on a poster board or chalk board for the whole family to see Continue to let your child know how proud you are of them and what a good job they are doing after tackling each goal They will continue to look forward

    Original URL path: http://www.nationalspeech.com/table-blues/archives/09-2015 (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Blog Archives - National Speech/Language Therapy Center
    and her family comes running Typically she will get the question Mom what s for dinner However getting kids interested in the preparing and cooking of dinner can help not only build their language skills but their motivation to try new foods Here are some tips to get kids involved in the kitchen Take kids to the grocery store I know you may want to stop right here However giving kids their own grocery list with words or pictures will help them to feel empowered and excited about whats to come Have kids unpack the groceries They can wash fruit and vegetables or help to put them away in the refrigerator Give kids a task while cooking dinner Maybe they will be the best tomato counter in the land as you have them count out 20 of each ingredient for the salad Or they can demonstrate their strength by mashing the potatoes in a bowl Don t be afraid to ask kids what they want to eat within set boundaries Instead of ordering out for pizza may individual ones at home Each family member can choose their own toppings This opens the door for many conversations as well as language tasks such as naming colors and counting Have kids be servers at dinner It could be their job to pass out the dinner rolls or to pass everyone the green beans Kids are more likely to be active participants during mealtime even the picky ones when they have a specific task to do The mealtime possibilities are endless Remember dinner is another opportunity to talk about food and where it comes from as well as spend precious time with your child Happy eating April Have a little one at home Attached are some fun pre dinner coloring sheets they will

    Original URL path: http://www.nationalspeech.com/table-blues/archives/07-2015 (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Blog Archives - National Speech/Language Therapy Center
    questions please feel free to email us directly Join in with me as we uncover a sweeter melody to mealtime Follow us on Facebook Follow all of Table Blues social media sites 6 12 2015 0 Comments Thank you for all of your support 0 Comments Edible Play Dough 6 11 2015 0 Comments A fun weekend craft the whole family can enjoy This serves as a great protein snack for our friends without a nut allergy What you will need 1 cup creamy peanut butter 3 tablespoons honey 3 4 cup of nonfat powdered milk or powdered sugar mixing bowl Directions Mix all ingredients into a bowl Add more peanut butter if it s too dry or more powdered milk sugar if it s too sticky Wash your hands again before you play with it so you can eat it later Fun Tips Use cookie cutters to make fun shapes Get creative with pretzel sticks raw vegetables or marshmallows to create fun objects and people Put into a zip closing plastic storage bag in the refrigerator until ready to eat Make multiple batches for multiple kids This recipe was adapted from coffeecupsandcrayons com 0 Comments April Anderson MA CCC

    Original URL path: http://www.nationalspeech.com/table-blues/archives/06-2015 (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Blog Archives - National Speech/Language Therapy Center
    mealtime Follow us on Facebook Skip the Take Out 5 1 2015 0 Comments Today we welcomed May with open arms warmer temperatures and thoughts of the weekend on our mind Weekend dinner planning can be difficult and it is often too easy to order take out This weekend I challenge you to try a better option that will even get the kids involved Cheesy Chicken Bagel Pizzas are a

    Original URL path: http://www.nationalspeech.com/table-blues/archives/05-2015 (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Blog Archives - National Speech/Language Therapy Center
    I discovered Tiny Tastes an amazing app 1 99 on the app store It s a very colorful and animated app and tells the story of a kangaroo named Tiny who ventures out of her house for the first time During the story the user helps Tiny meet new friends and explore new places At the end of the story Tiny has worked up an appetite and asks the user to share some of their food with them This is where the fun begins The app allows you to take a picture of the child s food or drink and Tiny will eat the same thing right along with them The amount of time allotted is set with a timer and throughout the meal Tiny s food slowly disappears She also makes chewing noises and comments such as mmm and This is good At the end of the meal the adult can decide if the child ate enough to earn coins to go to the shop to purchase materials for mealtime or for the story Why is this a good app for a picky eater Tiny is a good example of a social story to use with children who have a fear of trying new things Social stories allow the user to not only see what Tiny sees but to become involved in the story A timer can be set to help with pacing of the meal or help the child sit at the table for a specified period of time Tiny s food and drink will disappear as she eats further engaging the child The child earns coins that can be immediately used to by utensils for mealtime or items for the story If you are looking for ways to extend mealtime or are hoping to have your child

    Original URL path: http://www.nationalspeech.com/table-blues/archives/04-2015 (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Blog Archives - National Speech/Language Therapy Center
    feeding tube may also have difficulty transitioning to an age appropriate feeding pattern However children who are considered typically developing can also develop a fear of food Research shows that 25 percent of children suffer with some degree of a feeding disorder In children who suffer from a developmental neurological or genetic disorders that number rises to 80 percent Branan Ramsey 2010 A feeding disorder is characterized by any difficulties eating or drinking including chewing sucking or swallowing Children who have not developed age appropriate feeding skills and or have a genetic developmental or behavioral disorders can have difficulty during mealtime Some signs and symptoms of a problem feeder include Trouble breathing when eating or drinking Choking gagging or excessive crying during mealtimes Tantrums when presented with new foods Excessive drooling or spillage of foods liquids from the mouth Difficulty chewing or swallowing food Restricted variety of foods eaten usually less than 20 Refusal of categories of food based on texture or basic food group Refusal to eat meals with the family In order to better treat children with feeding problems it is important to understand those children who do not meet the criteria Children who are picky eaters present with the following signs and symptoms Toomey 2010 Arvedson 2008 Eat a limited variety of foods but have around 30 foods they will eat Intake enough calories a day for growth and nutrition Lose interest in a certain food for a period of time but accept it again after a few weeks Eat at least one food from all major food groups protein grains fruits etc Tolerate a new food on the plate even if they don t eat it Although mealtimes with either issue can be difficult for parents distinguishing between the two helps SLPs create the best individualized

    Original URL path: http://www.nationalspeech.com/table-blues/archives/02-2015 (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive