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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | Specifications - Nikon D3000
    pixels 10 75 million Nikon DX format Image size pixels 3 872 x 2 592 L 2 896 x 1 944 M 1 936 x 1 296 S Sensitivity ISO 100 to 1600 in steps of 1 EV Can also be set to approx 1 EV above ISO 1600 ISO 3200 equivalent ISO sensitivity auto control available Storage media SD memory cards SDHC compliant Monitor 3 0 in approx 230k dot TFT LCD and brightness adjustment Exposure metering 3D Color Matrix Metering II Center weighted and Spot Metering Exposure modes Auto modes auto auto flash off scene modes Portrait Landscape Child Sports Close up Night portrait programmed auto with flexible program P shutter priority auto S aperture priority auto A manual M Interface Hi Speed USB Power sources One Rechargeable Li ion Battery EN EL9a Dimensions W x H x D Approx 126 x 97 x 65 mm 5 0 x 3 8 x 2 6 in Weight Approx 485 g 1 lb 1 oz without battery memory card or body cap Specifications and equipment are subject to change without any notice or obligation on the part of the manufacturer July 2009 Digital SLR Cameras Line Up D4S D4 D3X

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/d3000/spec.htm (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | Lens Compatiblity - Nikon D3000
    teleconverter 5 6 6 2 Other AF NIKKOR except lenses for F3AF 7 2 AI P NIKKOR 8 2 Compatible Not Compatible Use AF S or AF I lenses to get the most from your camera Vibration Reduction VR supported with VR lenses Spot metering meters selected focus point Can not be used with shifting or tilting The camera s exposure metering and flash control systems may not function as expected when the lens is shifted and or tilted or an aperture other than the maximum aperture is used AF S or AF I lens required With maximum effective aperture of f 5 6 or faster When AF 80 200mm f 2 8 AF 35 70mm f 2 8 AF 28 85mm f 3 5 4 5 New or AF 28 85mm f 3 5 4 5 lenses are zoomed all the way in at the minimum focus distance the in focus indicator may be displayed when the image on the matte screen in the viewfinder is not in focus Focus manually until image in viewfinder is in focus With maximum aperture of f 5 6 or faster Compatible Non CPU lenses Non CPU lenses may only be used when the camera is in mode M Selecting another mode disables the shutter release Aperture must be adjusted manually via the lens aperture ring and the camera metering system i TTL flash control and other features requiring a CPU lens can not be used Lens Accessories Camera settings Focus Mode Metering AF MF with electronic rangefinder MF Auto and scene modes P S A M AI AI modified NIKKOR or Nikon Series E lenses 1 2 Medical NIKKOR 120mm f 4 2 3 Reflex NIKKOR 2 PC NIKKOR 4 2 AI type Teleconverter 5 2 Bellows Focusing Attachment PB 6 6

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/d3000/compatibility.htm (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | Sample Images - Nikon D3000
    Metering II Sensitivity ISO 200 White balance Auto Picture control Portrait Image quality JPEG Basic 8 bit Lens AF S DX VR Zoom Nikkor 55 200mm f 4 5 6G IF ED Sample Images 2 Photographer Carles Carabi Original data size JPG 1 23 MB Shutter speed 1 10 second Aperture f 4 Focal length 55mm Exposure mode Landscape Exposure metering 3D Color Matrix Metering II Sensitivity ISO 200 White balance Auto Picture control Landscape Image quality JPEG Basic 8 bit Lens AF S DX VR Zoom Nikkor 55 200mm f 4 5 6G IF ED Sample Images 3 Photographer Carles Carabi Original data size JPG 779 KB Shutter speed 1 200 second Aperture f 8 Focal length 72mm Exposure mode Close up Exposure metering 3D Color Matrix Metering II Sensitivity Auto ISO 100 White balance Auto Picture control Standard Image quality JPEG Basic 8 bit Lens AF S DX VR Zoom Nikkor 55 200mm f 4 5 6G IF ED Sample Images 4 Photographer Kenji Nanba Original data size JPG 431 KB Shutter speed 1 80 second Aperture f 8 Focal length 55mm Exposure mode Close up Exposure metering 3D Color Matrix Metering II Sensitivity Auto ISO 100 White

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/d3000/sample.htm (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | DSLR Camera Basics | DSLR Camera Construction
    lens The single lens in the name single lens reflex is a reference to this feature a single lens serves both for taking photographs and for the viewfinder The reflex portion refers to the reflection of light DSLR Cameras are equipped with mirrors that guide light from the lens into the viewfinder by reflecting it upward hence the term reflex The light that is reflected upward falls on the viewfinder focusing screen after passing through the screen it then proceeds through a pentaprism or pentamirror to the viewfinder eyepiece window This allows the photographer to view the image from the camera lens directly in the viewfinder When the shutter release button is pressed all the way down the mirror is raised and the light coming through the lens proceeds straight through to the shutter curtain The curtain simultaneously opens to allow the light to fall on the image sensor and a photograph is taken The shutter then closes and the mirror drops back into its original position By linking the action of the shutter with the movement of the mirror the light passing through the lens can be made to fall on either the viewfinder focusing screen or the image sensor Some newer DSLR Cameras can display the view through the lens in the monitor this is known as live view The mirror is raised during live view blocking the light that would otherwise reach the focusing screen and preventing photographs from being framed in the viewfinder The Optical Path from the Lens Through the Mirror to the Viewfinder To view this content JavaScript must be enabled and you need the latest version of the Adobe Flash Player The illustration is an artist s conception Before the shutter release button is pressed all the way down the mirror inside the

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/basics/01/01.htm (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | DSLR Camera Basics | Shutter and Aperture Construction
    looking through the viewfinder can see the subject Live view in contrast uses a monitor on the rear of the camera to display the light passing through the lens In live view pictures are framed in the monitor rather than in the viewfinder Live View Photography The first step in live view photography is to press the live view button to activate live view mode The reflex mirror inside the camera clicks up and the subject is displayed in the monitor The photographer frames the subject in the monitor focuses and presses the shutter release button to take pictures To view this content JavaScript must be enabled and you need the latest version of the Adobe Flash Player Note Artist s conception The live view switch is used to select between the viewfinder and live view Light does not enter the viewfinder during live view and consequently no image appears in the viewfinder Movie Live View The ability to record movies is another feature of DSLR Cameras starting with the D90 To record movies the camera must be in live view mode Pressing the movie record button in live view mode starts movie recording Press the button a second time

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/basics/01/03.htm (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | DSLR Camera Basics | Shutter and Aperture Construction
    is raised and the shutter opens allowing light to fall on the image sensor Changing the shutter speed changes the length of time the shutter is open The lens has an aperture or opening consisting of a diaphragm composed of overlapping blades Changing the aperture value f number changes the size of this opening in turn changing the amount of light it allows through The higher the f number e g f 16 the smaller the size of the opening the lower the f number e g f 2 8 the larger the size of the opening The camera controls the amount of light that falls on the image sensor by adjusting the length of time the shutter is open and the size of the aperture The Shutter To view this content JavaScript must be enabled and you need the latest version of the Adobe Flash Player When the shutter is open light falls on the image sensor Increasing the time the shutter is open increases the amount of light that falls on the sensor while reducing the time reduces the amount of light The Aperture To view this content JavaScript must be enabled and you need the latest version

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/basics/01/02.htm (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | DSLR Camera Basics | Exposure
    or a shot of a dark interior look bright DSLR Cameras have auto exposure systems that automatically produce photographs of optimal brightness You can use this system for optimal results with both brightly lit and poorly lit subjects This is referred to as optimal exposure Photograph taken using auto exposure The camera meters the brightness and color of the subject and automatically adjusts exposure for optimal results In concrete terms leaving the camera in charge of exposure produces optimal results with a variety of scenes Photographers however may feel that brighter results would be better for some photographs and that darker results would be better for others meaning that they may not necessarily find that the optimal exposure selected by the auto exposure system is suitable for all photographs The Same Scene Photographed at Different Exposures Reducing exposure emphasizes shadows and makes the sky a darker blue In this photograph the camera auto exposure system has adjusted exposure for optimal results Increasing exposure brings out details in shadows including the road and cars Here are some samples of the same scene photographed at different exposures You may want to reduce exposure to bring out the color of the sky or

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/basics/04/01.htm (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | DSLR Camera Basics | Setting Exposure: Shutter Speed and Aperture
    is open and the shorter the time the image sensor is exposed to light The shorter the time the image sensor is exposed to light the darker the resulting photograph On the other hand the slower the shutter speed the longer the time the image sensor is exposed to light and the brighter the resulting photograph Aperture expressed as an f number controls the brightness of the image that passes through the lens and falls on the image sensor The higher the f number the darker the image projected on the image sensor and the darker the resulting photograph On the other hand the lower the f number the brighter the image projected on the image sensor and the brighter the resulting photograph Exposure is determined by the combination of shutter speed and aperture f number If you increase the f number you can still achieve optimal exposure by choosing a slower shutter speed To put it another way if you lower the f number you can still produce a photograph of the same brightness by choosing a faster shutter speed Shutter speed slowed in proportion to the increase in f number To view this content JavaScript must be enabled and you need the latest version of the Adobe Flash Player The illustration is an artist s conception Shutter speed increased in proportion to the reduction in f number To view this content JavaScript must be enabled and you need the latest version of the Adobe Flash Player The illustration is an artist s conception High f number slow shutter speed Low f number fast shutter speed Different combinations of shutter speed and aperture used to achieve the same exposure Sample Camera Displays camera information display Shutter speed Speeds faster than one second are shown as fractions e g 1

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/basics/04/02.htm (2016-02-17)
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