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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | DSLR Camera Basics | Maximum Aperture (Minimum f-number)
    lens model name AF S NIKKOR 50 mm f 1 4G AF S NIKKOR 24 70mm F2 8G ED AF S DX NIKKOR 18 55mm F3 5 5 6G VR Examples Lens name Maximum aperture Lettering on lens AF S NIKKOR 50mm F1 4G F1 4 1 1 4 AF S NIKKOR 24 70mm F2 8G ED Fixed at f 2 8 regardless of focal length selected with lens 1 2 8 AF S DX NIKKOR 18 55mm F3 5 5 6G VR Varies with lens focal length progressing from f 3 5 to f 5 6 as lens is zoomed in from 18 mm to 55 mm 1 3 5 5 6 Lens with small maximum aperture AF S DX NIKKOR 18 55mm F3 5 5 6G VR Lens with wide maximum aperture AF S NIKKOR 24 70mm F2 8G ED The maximum aperture indicates the brightness of the image that the lens creates on the image sensor lenses with wider maximum apertures lower minimum f numbers create a brighter image on the image sensor than lenses with small maximum apertures higher minimum f numbers Lenses with wide maximum apertures are referred to as fast lenses because they create a brighter image on the image sensor allowing faster shutter speeds In some cases a lens with a wide maximum aperture can be used for blur free photography of subjects that might be blurred when photographed using a lens with a small maximum aperture In addition wider maximum apertures allow smaller depths of field that soften backgrounds meaning the wider the maximum aperture the greater the softening effect and the more the subject appears to be separated from the background Maximum aperture and depth of field Lens with small maximum aperture Click image to enlarge Lens with wide maximum aperture

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/basics/19/02.htm (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | DSLR Camera Basics | Minimum Focus Distance
    The illustration is an artist s conception The lens can not focus at distances shorter than the minimum focus distance It is useful to know how close your lens can be to the subject and still focus AF S DX NIKKOR 18 55mm F3 5 5 6G VR Different lenses have different minimum focus distances The minimum focus distance of an AF S DX NIKKOR 18 55 mm f 3 5 5 6G VR lens is 0 28 m or 0 92 ft a little over 11 inches this information appears on the lens as 0 28 m 0 92 ft AF S NIKKOR 50mm F1 4G The minimum focus distance of an AF S NIKKOR 50 mm f 1 4G is 0 45 m about 1 5 feet or 18 inches the minimum focus distance is shown in the lens focus distance display Reproduction Ratio Reproduction ratio or photographic magnification is the ratio of the size of the image on the image sensor to the actual size of the subject For example if the length of a 5 cm object on the image sensor is 1 cm the reproduction ratio is 1 5 0 2 The higher the reproduction

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/basics/19/04.htm (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | DSLR Camera Basics | Depth of Field
    Field Depth of Field Depth of field is the distance that appears to be in focus in front of and behind the point on which the lens is actually focused Depth of field is determined by aperture lens focal length and the distance to the subject Aperture Wider apertures lower f numbers reduce depth of field smaller apertures higher f numbers increase depth of field Lens focal length Longer focal lengths reduce depth of field shorter focal lengths increase depth of field Distance to the subject Shorter distances reduce depth of field greater distances increase depth of field Short depth of field Long depth of field Aperture Wide low f number Small high f number Focal length Long telephoto lens Short wide angle lens Distance to subject Short Long Depth of field Depth of field short Wide aperture Long focal length Short distance to subject Depth of field long Small aperture Short focal length Long distance to subject Although the above photographs were taken in the same location background details are much more blurred in one than in the other As you can see you can change the impression the photograph creates by changing the aperture focal length and distance

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/basics/19/05.htm (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | DSLR Camera Basics | Flash Mode
    a Flash If a flash is not used when lighting is poor shutter speeds will slow and photographs may be blurred If the subject is back lit details in shadow areas may be lost The flash can be used to prevent blur or to illuminate details in backlit subjects Photo taken without flash Photo taken with flash These photographs of a backlit subject were taken indoors Using the flash makes the portrait subject brighter Different flash modes are available to control the effect produced by the flash These flash modes include fill flash slow sync and rear curtain sync Fill Flash Shutter speed is automatically set to around 1 60 s and the flash fires with each shot brightening poorly lit portrait subjects Because the intensity of the light from the flash diminishes with distance objects behind the main subject will appear dark Slow Sync The flash is used to light the main subject and slow shutter speeds are used to ensure that objects in the background that are not fully lit by the flash are correctly exposed Portrait subjects will be brightly lit and the shutter will remain open after the flash has fired to ensure that night scenery or dark interiors behind the portrait subject are correctly exposed To view this content JavaScript must be enabled and you need the latest version of the Adobe Flash Player The illustration is an artist s conception Fill flash and slow sync Fill flash Slow sync These portraits were taken against a night backdrop using a flash The portrait subject in the photograph taken using fill flash is correctly exposed but the background is dark This is due to the fact that fill flash is intended only to light the main subject In contrast both the portrait subject and the background

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/basics/24/01.htm (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | DSLR Camera Basics | Flash Level (Guide Number)
    aperture f number Using the guide number it is easy to calculate the how close the subject should be at a given aperture or the aperture required to photograph a subject at a given distance If the flash unit has a guide number of 12 at ISO 100 and aperture is set to f 4 the subject can be up to 3 m away If the subject is more than 3 m distant the flash will not be bright enough to light the subject and the photograph will be underexposed Increasing ISO sensitivity increases the guide number consequently raising ISO sensitivity makes it possible to achieve optimal exposure at greater distances DSLR Cameras can also be used with optional flash units with higher guide numbers Using an optional flash unit such as the Nikon SB 400 or SB 900 makes it possible to achieve optimal exposure at greater distances than with the built in flash We recommend using an optional flash unit when taking photographs at weddings and in other situations in which you may frequently be taking photographs at a distance from the subject Subject photographed at short range with a low power low guide number flash Subject photographed at long range with a low power low guide number flash Subject photographed at long range with a high power high guide number flash Illustrations are an artist s conception Photographs taken at different distances with a built in flash Subject close to camera Subject far from camera These photographs were taken using a built in flash with the subject at different distances At fairly close distances the light from the flash is sufficient for optimal exposure but the farther the subject is from the camera the darker the photographs become Photographs taken at different ISO sensitivities ISO 200 ISO

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/basics/24/02.htm (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | DSLR Camera Basics | Movie Options
    Frame Size Frame Rate Movie Quality Movie Options The Movie settings option in the shooting menu controls movie quality expressed as a combination of frame size frame rate and image quality bit rate Choose an option according to the scene and how the movie will be used To view this content JavaScript must be enabled and you need the latest version of the Adobe Flash Player Related item Frame Size

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/basics/25/01.htm (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | DSLR Camera Basics | Frame Size
    the size the higher the resolution of the movie when viewed on a TV and the larger the image when displayed on a computer monitor Note however that larger frame sizes produce larger files reducing the footage that can be recorded to the memory card To view this content JavaScript must be enabled and you need the latest version of the Adobe Flash Player Movies recorded at frame sizes of

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/basics/25/02.htm (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | DSLR Camera Basics | Frame Rate
    fps when NTSC the video standard in use in North America the Caribbean and the Philippines is selected for Video mode in the setup menu and rates of 50 25 and 24 when PAL the video standard in use in much of the rest of the English speaking world is se lected To view this content JavaScript must be enabled and you need the latest version of the Adobe Flash

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/basics/25/03.htm (2016-02-17)
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